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Old 12-29-2012, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I know I have heard of Wal-Mart Supercenters being built on outskirts of town. I have never heard of malls built in rural areas. I think of the traditional sense that malls are in suburban neighborhoods or alone freeways in commercial districts.

I think of the mall as one symbol of suburbia. But I know malls are in urban areas as well. Are they in rural areas too?
Factory outlet malls are typically built in rural areas, or exurban, at the very least.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Factory outlet malls are typically built in rural areas, or exurban, at the very least.
There's a number I'm familiar with built in industrial (urban) areas -- several outlets in Reading, Pennsylvania and a couple of sets in Elizabeth and Secaucus, NJ. These are older, however; the newer outlets under the "Mills" and "Premium" brands are generally built exurban/rural, like you say.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There's a number I'm familiar with built in industrial (urban) areas -- several outlets in Reading, Pennsylvania and a couple of sets in Elizabeth and Secaucus, NJ. These are older, however; the newer outlets under the "Mills" and "Premium" brands are generally built exurban/rural, like you say.
Those were the ones I was referring to. I think its all the same handful of companies that own like 20 or 30 of them; Prime Outlets comes to mind. They usually build far enough outside of the urban areas so people by car can get to them, but close to the highway. Probably cheap land out there, which is how traditional suburban malls got their start anyway.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
No malls usually require a catchment area of, if you're talking a large enclosed mall, at least 100,000 I would say.
There may be a formula for it. It was not unusual for the amount of malls a city has, to equal about one mall per 100,000 people. That was of course at their peak in the 80s/90s. These days a large city may only have one or two malls, with the rest of the retail sustained through strip malls and lifestyle centers. Plus, a lot of those malls are either dead malls, or closed down, due to their proximity to the "ghetto" low-income suburban areas they support.

I know in Ohio it was nothing for a large city like Cleveland or Cincinnati to have four, five, six malls or more. But lifestyle centers have taken over, and a lot of those indoor malls have closed. Where I grew up in Akron we had 3 malls, and less than 300,000 people. That didn't last long though; one of those malls have closed, for the exact reason I mentioned in the previous paragraph, same thing happened out in suburban Cleveland.

In fact, when I came to Hampton Roads I thought it was odd that cities like Virginia Beach only had one or two malls, given their population. But now I understand it; there are enough strip malls, lifestyle centers, and detached stores around here you really do not need four or five malls per city. That seems to be an older, outdated concept.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by the city View Post
I always imagined outlet malls being in smaller populated suburban areas with a tourist draw. And enclosed malls being in larger populated suburban areas.

I think of cities with malls more suburban than cities without malls.
Depends on the city; Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, and even New York have traditional indoor, multilevel shopping malls. None of those cities are suburban. Some of those cities have malls downtown, or in the case of New York, in Manhattan.

There are no hard and fast rules. It is cheaper to build multilevel malls in suburban areas than it is in the city core. That is one of the reasons why shopping malls downtown do not work; more expensive retail, expensive parking, etc. So you'll get a Sak's Fifth Avenue downtown, or stores within the mall selling Versace, etc. where that may not necessarily be the case in suburban malls (with the exception of Factory Outlet stores). A lot of downtown malls have underground parking.
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:07 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There's a number I'm familiar with built in industrial (urban) areas -- several outlets in Reading, Pennsylvania and a couple of sets in Elizabeth and Secaucus, NJ. These are older, however; the newer outlets under the "Mills" and "Premium" brands are generally built exurban/rural, like you say.
Colorado Mills is in a suburban area west of Denver.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Depends on the city; Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, and even New York have traditional indoor, multilevel shopping malls. None of those cities are suburban. Some of those cities have malls downtown, or in the case of New York, in Manhattan.

There are no hard and fast rules. It is cheaper to build multilevel malls in suburban areas than it is in the city core. That is one of the reasons why shopping malls downtown do not work; more expensive retail, expensive parking, etc. So you'll get a Sak's Fifth Avenue downtown, or stores within the mall selling Versace, etc. where that may not necessarily be the case in suburban malls (with the exception of Factory Outlet stores). A lot of downtown malls have underground parking.
There is a multilevel mall on the 16th St. Mall in Denver (supposedly a "transit" mall). It has mostly the same stores as any suburban mall. Denver also has a traditional, suburban style mall on the east side, Cherry Creek Mall. Cherry Creek has underground parking. The 16th St. Mall is a pedestrian/transit mall.
16th Street Mall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Birch Run, Michigan (population of 1555) has an unusually large outlet mall right off the freeway. The nearest cities of a decent size are 20 minutes away.

43.24686,-83.778011 - Google Maps

The outlet mall at West Branch, Michigan is in a smaller town.
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Factory outlet malls are typically built in rural areas, or exurban, at the very least.

Not always. One was recently opened in the northern suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio right along I-75. Also, the Great Lakes Crossing Outlet Shops is an outlet mall located in the northern suburbs of Detroit.
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Colorado Mills is in a suburban area west of Denver.



There is a multilevel mall on the 16th St. Mall in Denver (supposedly a "transit" mall). It has mostly the same stores as any suburban mall. Denver also has a traditional, suburban style mall on the east side, Cherry Creek Mall. Cherry Creek has underground parking. The 16th St. Mall is a pedestrian/transit mall.
16th Street Mall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oh I see now; 16th st. mall is the location of the multilevel mall. 16th st. mall is not a mall in the traditional sense, but it has a lot of retail, as well as mall. The "mall" in the way it is used here, is more about the experience, as though it were a lifestyle center just woven into an existing downtown, not meant to be taken literally.

But what is the name of the multilevel mall itself though? I didn't get that information from the wiki.
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Old 12-29-2012, 08:46 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Depends on the city; Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, and even New York have traditional indoor, multilevel shopping malls. None of those cities are suburban. Some of those cities have malls downtown, or in the case of New York, in Manhattan.
The only indoor mall I can think of in Manhattan is a small one. There's a lot of shopping in the surrounding area at street level, but the mall itself has little:

Manhattan Mall - Store Listing

Maybe the mall is at a bit of a disadvantage because you won't notice all the stores walking by on the street. Elsewhere in the city, there's a mall by Downtown Brooklyn (with a Target) and more typical suburban-looking one in Queens (haven't been to that one). Both charge for parking, the Brooklyn one is built on top of a railroad station and subway line junction.
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