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Old 01-21-2013, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Florida
862 posts, read 1,216,005 times
Reputation: 1407

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeNigh View Post
Most americans are safely in a bubble at all times. If they really sat and thought about it, quite frankly they barely interact with anyone their entire lives. Urban living is the only way to LIVE in comparison.
No, I don't think so, especially if you have children. Urban places tend to be overpriced and lack adequate affordable nice houses.
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Old 01-22-2013, 10:41 AM
 
2,145 posts, read 1,589,068 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by CountryFisher View Post
No, I don't think so, especially if you have children. Urban places tend to be overpriced and lack adequate affordable nice houses.
I agree that cities are no place for children, and not only because there is no place to play. I once had an apartment near my work in a fairly upscale district of warehouse converts, yet on my walk to work one morning I passed a crime scene complete with giant pool of blood on the sidewalk. That and a woman was attacked in the stairwell of my building once when a bum followed her in. You rarely ever see giant pools of blood nor bums who attack people in the suburbs. Kids should feel secure when they are growing up.
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:15 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
You rarely ever see giant pools of blood nor bums who attack people in the suburbs. .
Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Columbine High School massacre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2012 Aurora shooting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What inner-city did these occur in?
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:39 PM
 
2,145 posts, read 1,589,068 times
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So your rebuttal is 'not usually' is not good enough? If your going to have some crime, might as well just take it all on like a man? Is that the argument?
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:41 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
So your rebuttal is 'not usually' is not good enough? If your going to have some crime, might as well just take it all on like a man? Is that the argument?
Certainly not my argument. Just a reminder that security is not guaranteed based on a Zip code.
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Old 01-22-2013, 12:44 PM
 
2,145 posts, read 1,589,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Certainly not my argument. Just a reminder that security is not guaranteed based on a Zip code.
We agree.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
I agree that cities are no place for children, and not only because there is no place to play. I once had an apartment near my work in a fairly upscale district of warehouse converts, yet on my walk to work one morning I passed a crime scene complete with giant pool of blood on the sidewalk. That and a woman was attacked in the stairwell of my building once when a bum followed her in. You rarely ever see giant pools of blood nor bums who attack people in the suburbs. Kids should feel secure when they are growing up.
That is a generalization that is not true of all city neighborhoods. Depends upon the neighborhoods. Cities can have nice neighborhoods with houses that have big yards and places for kids to play. Mine does. And when I lived in Chicago this was also true. They are not all made up of large apartment buildings block after block. But even so I lived in large apartment buildings in inner city Chicago and had plenty of places to play.

Where do kids play in the suburbs today? It seems to me their parents take them to play dates inside their homes.

And not all suburbs are all that safe either. It seems to me that most of the recent shootings in the schools have taken place in quiet suburban areas. Crime travels no matter where you go.

It's not the places cities or suburbs that make them safe or unsafe, it's the people in those places that make them safe or unsafe.
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:32 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,542,360 times
Reputation: 746
I think the jury is out on whether middle class families with children with stay in the city. In the past, the idea was that they moved to the suburbs when their kids hit school age. Even then that wasn't completely true. But now the volume of middle class families with children in the city is growing again. One option is to flee, another option is to work on improving the public schools. Private schools are another option. Finally there are the quasi-private schools nominally within public school systems known as charter schools.

There's also living in the city and living in the city. A pattern we've noticed, anecdotally, is people moving from San Francisco to Berkeley when they have school age children. Now Berkeley isn't hardcore big city, but it's not auto-based suburbia either. I wonder if something similar is happening in other big cities.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:00 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
I think the jury is out on whether middle class families with children with stay in the city. In the past, the idea was that they moved to the suburbs when their kids hit school age. Even then that wasn't completely true. But now the volume of middle class families with children in the city is growing again. One option is to flee, another option is to work on improving the public schools. Private schools are another option. Finally there are the quasi-private schools nominally within public school systems known as charter schools.

There's also living in the city and living in the city. A pattern we've noticed, anecdotally, is people moving from San Francisco to Berkeley when they have school age children. Now Berkeley isn't hardcore big city, but it's not auto-based suburbia either. I wonder if something similar is happening in other big cities.
SF is really expensive to live in once you get past one bedroom. I think berkley probably offers 2 at a nice discount, plus not much of a time penalty on the BART as opposed to far out MUNI options.

And just today I saw a flyer at my YMCA about a new charter going up in the neighborhood, which pleases me.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
I have spoken a lot about growing up in Chicago at a time when people lived in large affordable apartments and could walk everywhere and take public transportation everywhere and neighborhoods were great communities and schools were decent.

All I can say is I really hope that some how some way this will be available to people again. I wouldn't have traded it for a house in the suburbs for the world. I think those who want to experience this way of life in the future will have an uphill battle but more power to them. Reading all these posts on this thread I had no idea how lucky I was. Now I do.
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