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Old 01-04-2013, 10:52 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045

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Allow me to jump in here if you will. Not working today.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
It actually not too hard to board our buses, as they all "kneel" to the curb, and are equipped with a ramp for wheelchairs. I'd imagine since we have a higher transit share here (and higher percentage of carless) than in omaha then it would make sense that I see a greater number of elderly from the senior center on the bus.

I think the center by me is similar to you describe. A few on my street have parents or grandparents there and they walk over to visit sometime.

I just think it's unreasonable to assume that a person who walked and used transit for years 10-61 would not care about that mobility at age 62 (which is what I have been trying to get across). Anyway I see it everyday.

Im sure there are also residents therein who don't get out much.
First of all, "age 62" had me almost rolling on the floor laughing. Ah, the innocence of youth! 62 is not "old". I know that many of these sr. apts. have a lower age limit, usually 55, 62 or 65. However, my experience being a visiting nurse in these apts is that most people that live in them are much older. My experience becoming a codger (or is it codgerette) is that 62 is NOT old. Most 62 year olds are still in the workforce! You're right, from 61-62 is not some instantaneous change. Aging is a slow process. People age at different rates. Again, IME, most people are fairly mobile in their usual style (transit, driving, whatever) until their later 70s or 80s. I think my FIL gave up driving at about age 90 or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't think you read the post to which I replied. The poster said that he would be cruising around in a wheelchair and riding transit in his old age. If you're confined to a wheelchair in your 70s or 80s, you're probably already dependent on people anyway. These are usually people who have a hard time getting to the bathroom little less rolling to a bus stop or subway stop in a wheelchair and riding transit down to dialysis. "Meals on Wheels" and the special vans many transit agencies operate are intended precisely for these types of people.

Older people who can get around on their own power without the use of a wheelchair or a walker are a completely different story.

If you live to be 81, have decent vision with corrective lenses, and can run errands without assistance, then consider yourself blessed. But for every 81 year old who fits that bill, I can find 10 who don't. The self-sufficient 80+ year old is definitely the exception, not the rule.
Agreed!
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
First of all, "age 62" had me almost rolling on the floor laughing. Ah, the innocence of youth! 62 is not "old". I know that many of these sr. apts. have a lower age limit, usually 55, 62 or 65. However, my experience being a visiting nurse in these apts is that most people that live in them are much older. My experience becoming a codger (or is it codgerette) is that 62 is NOT old. Most 62 year olds are still in the workforce! You're right, from 61-62 is not some instantaneous change. Aging is a slow process. People age at different rates. Again, IME, most people are fairly mobile in their usual style (transit, driving, whatever) until their later 70s or 80s. I think my FIL gave up driving at about age 90 or so.
No, I wouldn't consider 62 "elderly." Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are both 66, but I don't think we typically think of people their age as "senior citizens" though I suppose they technically count as such. When I think of the "elderly," I think of people who are literally counting down the days.

http://image1.masterfile.com/em_w/00...-00823098w.jpg

I wouldn't be rolling to the subway if I were this guy. I'd be satisfied with a game of Bingo and a few hours of Wheel of Fortune.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post


First of all, "age 62" had me almost rolling on the floor laughing. Ah, the innocence of youth!
Charming, if not a little ageist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
62 is not "old". I know that many of these sr. apts. have a lower age limit, usually 55, 62 or 65. However, my experience being a visiting nurse in these apts is that most people that live in them are much older. My experience becoming a codger (or is it codgerette) is that 62 is NOT old. Most 62 year olds are still in the workforce! You're right, from 61-62 is not some instantaneous change. Aging is a slow process.
I never said 62 was old. However, as you say, the housing choices start early. The senior apartment in my neighborhood is for tenants over 62 (which is also the earliest one can receive SS retirement benefits, although they are reduced from the amount one would received if they reach full retirement age). When choosing such a place (especially those with graduated levels of care in which one will be until they die), mobility for the years 62-X is a concern. It wasn't for my grandmother, who was into her 80s when she left the city. It might be for her sister, who is 95, still in her home, and still somewhat of a busybody.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
People age at different rates. Again, IME, most people are fairly mobile in their usual style (transit, driving, whatever) until their later 70s or 80s.
Exactly.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:37 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
I did post some data about 78% remaining right in their own homes.

My sister-in-law bought a condo in one of these elderly complexes right after she turned 55 (the minimum age for that complex), but it was after a divorce and she had no real "home" any more. So this condo is her home.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:46 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,095,690 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I did post some data about 78% remaining right in their own homes. .
For me, this alone makes the case for the purchase of a one-story house or condo, something I'll probably think about when next I buy. As much as I love my rowhouse I do not wish to get old in it, though all of my depression-era relatives never complained about it (or anything).
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:53 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
First of all, "age 62" had me almost rolling on the floor laughing. Ah, the innocence of youth! 62 is not "old". I know that many of these sr. apts. have a lower age limit, usually 55, 62 or 65.
Meh. I didn't think old meant too old to function in everyday life, just older than the general population. Maybe not 62, but 65 or 66 is the technical senior citizen age and a common retirement age so by definition, that's old. And sure, plenty of older people still work and regardless are healthy.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:54 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
For me, this alone makes the case for the purchase of a one-story house or condo, something I'll probably think about when next I buy. As much as I love my rowhouse I do not wish to get old in it, though all of my depression-era relatives never complained about it (or anything).
Our two story house does have a bedroom and bathroom on the first floor. It's where I stayed when I had my hip surgery, prior to codgerette-hood.

My depression era relatives didn't complain about anything either. They were happy for what little they did have.
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,364 posts, read 59,787,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
My sister-in-law bought a condo in one of these elderly complexes right after she turned 55 (the minimum age for that complex)
I'll be able to buy one of those in 2014! Woo-hoo!

Unfortunately, I can't afford most of them ...
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I'll be able to buy one of those in 2014! Woo-hoo!

Unfortunately, I can't afford most of them ...
My SIL said the reason she bought there was it was very inexpensive (relative to the rest of the Denver housing market).
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Old 01-04-2013, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
For me, this alone makes the case for the purchase of a one-story house or condo, something I'll probably think about when next I buy. As much as I love my rowhouse I do not wish to get old in it, though all of my depression-era relatives never complained about it (or anything).
You'll find me "limin" at Bathsheba. Barbados actually has the highest number of centenarians per capita of any country in the world.

It would be nice if Rihanna (or better yet, a lookalike) came with my retirement package, but she's not necessary.


Rihanna Barbados 2012 Tourism Campaign - YouTube
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