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Old 01-07-2013, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,717,890 times
Reputation: 35455

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Quote:
Originally Posted by drum bro View Post
the one that goes on burnside
There are some nice apartments along that route. I hope you have a good one. Best of luck to you.
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:39 PM
 
Location: The South
683 posts, read 812,356 times
Reputation: 724
Something like 80% of every new housing unit being built in Charlotte this year is going up near a light rail station.

It's not just young people who want to live in neighborhoods where they have an alternative to having to use a car for every task; empty nesters, and the elderly are also becoming more attracted to less auto-dependent neighborhoods. Part of this is that owning a car is expensive; part is health -- walking is good for you; part is wanting to live in a place where you can interact with others informally...

There are much evidence emerging...the National Association of Realtors recently released information about it... Here's an article from George Washington University:

DC: The WalkUP Wake-Up Call
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,717,890 times
Reputation: 35455
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanmyth View Post
Something like 80% of every new housing unit being built in Charlotte this year is going up near a light rail station.

It's not just young people who want to live in neighborhoods where they have an alternative to having to use a car for every task; empty nesters, and the elderly are also becoming more attracted to less auto-dependent neighborhoods. Part of this is that owning a car is expensive; part is health -- walking is good for you; part is wanting to live in a place where you can interact with others informally...

There are much evidence emerging...the National Association of Realtors recently released information about it... Here's an article from George Washington University:

DC: The WalkUP Wake-Up Call
Well, yes as I mentioned before, many older people like myself may want to go back to they way the used to live in these types of cities they remember growing up in before they moved to the suburbs.
That's when it wasn't unique, trendy, cool or special to live in them and they were affordable. They were simply place in which to live.

As for me, I never left.
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