U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-24-2012, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,495,175 times
Reputation: 4893

Advertisements

I am essentially the prototypical young person the OP describes. I live in an apartment in Vancouver, British Columbia and commute exclusively using public transit. There are a number of reasons for this and they all contribute. First of all, I'm a university student and so don't have a lot of money. I can't afford the thousands of dollars it would cost to buy a used car, pay for insurance, buy gas, and pay for parking. My city is set up for public transit and walking and a car would be an unnecessary expense that wouldn't benefit me that much. I think it might be nice to use it to go out to the mountains and go on road trips and shop at big box stores in the burbs, but I've done pretty good with alternatives the times I've wanted to do those things and it's worked out to huge savings.

I also like minimizing my driving because when I lived in the very autocentric suburbs of Montreal, I always felt guilty about my carbon footprint. Living this way (our transport is largely electric and powered by hydroelectricity) I feel like I'm living right and making moral choices. I don't consider this to be a political issue and don't think of myself as a leftist, it's just a moral one and I try to do the best that I can, like everyone does.

I also enjoy going out drinking and not having to worry too much about driving home, this is a plus.

I absolutely LOATHED sitting in traffic for hours everyday, and I'd have to if I owned a car because I wouldn't have enough money to live closer to the city if I owned one.

What's more, I like the street life in a car-unfriendly urban environment. There's always people about, and I can get anything I could want within a ten minute walk. As I'm walking to go to the bank I see lots of eclectic little hole in the wall shops and I go explore them on a whim. If I lived in the suburbs, I'd never have gone to these places because I'd have to make a conscious decision to leave my house to go there and so I'd just zoom on by. These are interesting and pleasant experiences and it's nice to have this sort of thing going on, it adds to my life. It's really just an interesting place to be! There are protests, street festivals, people walking their dogs, young families, old people, the odd busker and all sorts of other things to see on my street, and that's part of why I love my home! Another reason is that people tend to build dense housing where there's demand for it, and there's often demand in this city because it's near some interesting feature. In my case, I'm near a beautiful regional park with hiking trails and old growth forest. It's nice to be able to live in a very modest apartment and still get to be near beautiful things like this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-24-2012, 08:24 PM
 
12,302 posts, read 15,205,734 times
Reputation: 8109
Car companies' new problem: Young people who don't want a driver's license
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeSides View Post
DING, DING, DING, DING, DING! I'm also interested in reading those studies.
Here's one. The cost of driving is just one factor. Social media reducing the need to be there. Desire to reduce carbon emissions. Perhaps traffic jams and automated violation enforcement as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Littleton, CO
3,111 posts, read 4,908,492 times
Reputation: 5429
There are several forces at work here:

The dangerous inner cities of 60s, 70s, and 80s have been remade into centers of "coolness." What was once full of urban decay is now the center of hip bars, concert halls, downtown sports arenas and stadiums, and more.

Many cities have improved the mass transit into and around the central cities with light rail and streetcars.

The decayed houses have been fixed up, and occupied by singles, empty-nesters and DINKs.

These groups are looking for a lifestyle that can't be found in the suburbs. The next real estate boom is in the cities.

The Brookings Institute has a good take on what's happening with walkable cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,676,966 times
Reputation: 35449
I guess I am just puzzled as to why this has become a "young" issue. People have chosen to live car free for decades. True it has not been the majority choice since about the 50's but it has always been a life choice for many for various reasons. I have never owned or driven a car as I mentioned before. Nor did other family members or friends. Not only my generation but those after mine of my acquaintance.

The car became king in the 50's I suppose especially after the large highways were built throught the country but there were always those who chose to live a car free life style without tacking on any political or moral baggage to it. It was just a decision as to how to live. Hundreds of New Yorkers, Chicagoans and other big city dwellers have been making this choice for a long time for practical and financial reasons without feeling a moral, political or ethical justification for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,799 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I guess I am just puzzled as to why this has become a "young" issue. People have chosen to live car free for decades. True it has not been the majority choice since about the 50's but it has always been a life choice for many for various reasons. I have never owned or driven a car as I mentioned before. Nor did other family members or friends. Not only my generation but those after mine of my acquaintance.

The car became king in the 50's I suppose especially after the large highways were built throught the country but there were always those who chose to live a car free life style without tacking on any political or moral baggage to it. It was just a decision as to how to live. Hundreds of New Yorkers, Chicagoans and other big city dwellers have been making this choice for a long time for practical and financial reasons without feeling a moral, political or ethical justification for it.
Perhaps because there places like that are so limited in the country is why. I listen to the radio here there is a talk show host saying the young people leaving are the problem, they don't have the right values etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 11:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Well, there is this:

New car buying by young rises after years of decline
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 11:48 PM
 
Location: I live wherever I am.
1,935 posts, read 3,743,844 times
Reputation: 3235
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
For most young people graduating college and moving to a new city, high walkability is near or at the top of their list. Many would prefer to not even have to own a car and simply use public transportation to get around wherever they can't walk to. I think walkable neighborhoods are great, but why is there such obsession with it to the point that anywhere not walkable is considered a backwards wasteland? Is it political i.e. carbon emissions and global warming? Is it because most were raised in suburbia? Phoenix comes to mind as the city has so much to offer yet is so trashed mostly due to lacking an abundance of walkable neighborhoods. Even if I could live in a walkable neighborhood, which I think I would enjoy, I would still want to own a car to drive to places I couldn't walk to without having to wait on public transportation.
When I was a teenager, I couldn't wait to get my license. After I got my license, I couldn't wait to get my first car.

Now I'm almost 33 years old and I hate it. I hate high gas prices, I hate traffic jams, I hate vehicular expenses, and I ESPECIALLY hate having to be dependent upon driving for the part of my livelihood that I love the most.

People become averse to the car-centric culture because they get to understanding that it really represents dependence upon conditions nobody likes... a form of slavery, so to speak. It's no longer the fantasy of independence that we used to have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2012, 02:23 AM
 
1,682 posts, read 2,723,053 times
Reputation: 713
This is international.

Millennials largely see more value in experiences over material objects.

Why have a car and live in the suburbs when you can experience more living in a big city. Walkabilty, more interaction with potential friends or more. Access to entertainment and culture enhance the chance exponentially. Cars isolate, you miss out on possible connections. The whole concept the suburbs is largely isolationist. My car, my house, my yard; instead of my community (everyone and everything in it).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2012, 02:42 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,515,215 times
Reputation: 15950
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Cars cost money.
Good point -- as the economic meltdown continues to fester and more of our overeseas trading partnters do more of the high-paying work Americans once did, a "new" car, like a closet full of expensive, high-maintainence and non-tax-deductible business clothing, becomes an expensive symbol of the downside of "Korporate Kommitment", and its rosy, often-empty promisies which can too often end in betrayal.

I spend my days mostly in exurban and rural areas, so I have no other option to owning a car; but I stick to "disposable cars" -- one-previous-owner common models with 40-60K on the odometer. The cost is usuallly in the $5000-$7000 range, and I start saving in advance, so that I either don't have to finance, or can do so with a smaller personal loan that I can pay off quickly. With conscientious regular maintainence, they usually have at least doubled their mileage before they begin to wear out.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 12-25-2012 at 02:56 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,480 posts, read 5,149,433 times
Reputation: 3548
My goal is to live in Boston or in a suburb of Boston with excellent public transit. My dream home would be a small home with parking for 1 car so that I could get out of the city and head to the nearby mountains of NH when I needed a break for the noise and activity of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top