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Old 12-26-2012, 09:11 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
I don't see why walkable/transit-friendly areas would only be appealing to the younger generation. I feel really sorry for the people who reside in senior centers within car-centric cities and can only get out when relatives pick them up or the recreational shuttle takes them to the bingo hall or wherever. When I get old and can no longer drive I'd like to be somewhere I can still feel independent and comfortable walking or riding around in my wheelchair. It'd be interesting to see how many people would still love their car-centric cities if they were stripped of their driver's licenses.
Those senior centers are pretty self-contained. The bingo hall is in the center. (I know, my MIL plays bingo every week at her senior residence.) If you have no direct experience with these seniors, you may not realize just how much their mobility is limited by their present state of health. Most of these people would not benefit from a bus stop in front of the building. Some, sadly, would not know what to do when the bus arrived, and wouldn't be able to get back home if they could get on the bus and go downtown, or wherever.
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Old 12-26-2012, 09:21 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Those senior centers are pretty self-contained. The bingo hall is in the center. (I know, my MIL plays bingo every week at her senior residence.) If you have no direct experience with these seniors, you may not realize just how much their mobility is limited by their present state of health. Most of these people would not benefit from a bus stop in front of the building. Some, sadly, would not know what to do when the bus arrived, and wouldn't be able to get back home if they could get on the bus and go downtown, or wherever.
That is an overgeneralization of "senior center." they provide different levels of care. Even though the one in my neighborhood is pretty self contained, I still see its plenty healhy denizens out and about, including at my bus stop. Many of these folks are lifelong users of the transit system here so I'm sure they continue to do so as they are able.

Contrast that to another home I'm familiar with where the level of care is more intensive. There would be no point for bus stops in front of that one except for the workers (who now have to walk about 1/4 mile from the nearest route)
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Old 12-26-2012, 02:24 PM
 
1,210 posts, read 885,394 times
Reputation: 1107
I think there are a few things at work here, some have been mentioned but here are my thoughts:

1. Cities have transformed themselves over the last 20 years. So many areas of Boston and NYC have transformed from sketchy into interesting, cultural, walkable neighborhoods. Even if the boomers wanted to live in cities, there weren't many options in the 70s. For Gen X and Y its a very different story.

2. Settling down later - Gen X and Y marry at a later age, and more of them stay single. This means they tend to spend 15 years post-college living in urban areas. Once you get used to walkability, it is very hard to go back to a car dependent life.

3. Social Media - when everyone is sharing what everyone else is doing, it creates a more vibrant and connected social life. The people that are always out doing things are sharing this information with everyone they know, thus driving demand to live in places where so much is happening. Cities are the ultimate social epicenter.

4. Even when people do have kids, they try to stay in the city for as long as possible - at least until the kids hit kindergarten. Additionally, the schools in the more gentrified neighborhoods are improving quickly, making raising kids in a city a viable option if you can afford the space needed.

5. Community - living in dense neighborhoods creates interactions with your neighbors. You see them more, you interact with them more. Also - I find it a fallacy that suburbs have more community, I actually see the suburbs as being quite transient, especially in the high-tax towns with the good schools where parents tend to move somewhere smaller and cheaper as soon as the kids graduate.

I shared my thoughts on why I actually think our semi-urban lifestyle is actually better for kids, but this really depends on how adventurous you want to be with your kids: Cities have more children than the suburbs?

Last edited by semiurbanite; 12-26-2012 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 12-26-2012, 02:31 PM
 
1,210 posts, read 885,394 times
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Oh and to the OP, yes there are studies supporting the fact that Gen Y prefers the city, just search Google for: "generation Y urban migration"

And also, here is a brookings study: The Next Real Estate Boom | Brookings Institution
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Old 12-26-2012, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,107,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
Oh and to the OP, yes there are studies supporting the fact that Gen Y prefers the city, just search Google for: "generation Y urban migration"

And also, here is a brookings study: The Next Real Estate Boom | Brookings Institution
Although I wouldn't say all or even the majority of my generation prefers urban environments - I just think it is a higher proportion than in the past. Most of my same-generation friends find my neighborhood to be a bit frightening and a lot of them stick to more suburban-style neighborhoods.

Though I do think it is possible for places to be both walkable and suburban.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
175 posts, read 227,363 times
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I am a grad student from Houston who now lives in NYC. Yes, walkability and public transportation were key considerations when scoping out cities to live. The car-centric lifestyle, in my personal and humble opinion, is frankly soul-sucking. Specifically I like walkable and public transit served cities because:

1) Driving in traffic is stressful, frustrating, and dangerous. Often confusing too with construction and detours.

2) I can be productive on public transportation. I work and go to school, so I enjoy using that time to pull out my flashcards or tablet and read/study.

3) I save money. Driving is expensive. Yes rent is higher here, but I am living with roommates so it is more affordable, especially with the split bills. Unlimited public transit is $104 for the month. I would spend much more than that a month on gas, not to mention car note and insurance. Without having that nonsense to pay for, my COL it is arguably a wash.

4) I like to drink. No worries now about how to get home safely.

5) It's green. I am not fanatical about environmental issues but it feels good to know that I am minimizing my carbon footprint, so to speak.

6) Walking is my favorite thing to do. There are countless neighborhoods here to explore, with their own unique sub-culture, energy, and vibe. And people don't look at me like I'm homeless and/or a prostitute for walking.

7) Walking is healthy and good exercise. I've lost some weight since moving here, not sure what else to attribute it to besides walking.

There are so many more reasons but these are just some notable ones that immediately come to mind. Hopefully there are some honest politicians who are not puppeteered by lobbyists who will get public transit initiatives funded in more cities. It will create a lot of jobs too building the infrastructure and maintaining the system. If I have a family someday I don't know that I will be able to feasibly stay in NYC, but I do know that I will never go back to an environment where I need a car for daily mundane tasks.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,192 posts, read 2,642,629 times
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I live in Colorado Springs and you have to have a car to get anywhere. This leads to people not knowing their neighbors and rings and rings of suburban rowhouses which have little character. That is why I would want to live in less auto central city.
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Old 01-02-2013, 08:49 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,954,341 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
I think there are a few things at work here, some have been mentioned but here are my thoughts:

1. Cities have transformed themselves over the last 20 years. So many areas of Boston and NYC have transformed from sketchy into interesting, cultural, walkable neighborhoods. Even if the boomers wanted to live in cities, there weren't many options in the 70s. For Gen X and Y its a very different story.

2. Settling down later - Gen X and Y marry at a later age, and more of them stay single. This means they tend to spend 15 years post-college living in urban areas. Once you get used to walkability, it is very hard to go back to a car dependent life.

3. Social Media - when everyone is sharing what everyone else is doing, it creates a more vibrant and connected social life. The people that are always out doing things are sharing this information with everyone they know, thus driving demand to live in places where so much is happening. Cities are the ultimate social epicenter.

4. Even when people do have kids, they try to stay in the city for as long as possible - at least until the kids hit kindergarten. Additionally, the schools in the more gentrified neighborhoods are improving quickly, making raising kids in a city a viable option if you can afford the space needed.

5. Community - living in dense neighborhoods creates interactions with your neighbors. You see them more, you interact with them more. Also - I find it a fallacy that suburbs have more community, I actually see the suburbs as being quite transient, especially in the high-tax towns with the good schools where parents tend to move somewhere smaller and cheaper as soon as the kids graduate.

I shared my thoughts on why I actually think our semi-urban lifestyle is actually better for kids, but this really depends on how adventurous you want to be with your kids: Cities have more children than the suburbs?
All of this ^^^^

Especially 1. It took cities 30 years to even start to come back from the anti-urban policies that developed post-WWII

4. I have kids and a major concern of everyone I know with kids is "school" but between the charters, magnets and better neighborhood schools most people make it work. I don't personally know many people who are breaking for the 'burbs.

5. It's surprised even me how much my social circle is now made up of people i've met in my neighborhood. I have to move for work but my neighbors will be what I miss the most.
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Old 01-02-2013, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,658,574 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
I think there are a few things at work here, some have been mentioned but here are my thoughts:

1. Cities have transformed themselves over the last 20 years. So many areas of Boston and NYC have transformed from sketchy into interesting, cultural, walkable neighborhoods. Even if the boomers wanted to live in cities, there weren't many options in the 70s. For Gen X and Y its a very different story.

2. Settling down later - Gen X and Y marry at a later age, and more of them stay single. This means they tend to spend 15 years post-college living in urban areas. Once you get used to walkability, it is very hard to go back to a car dependent life.

3. Social Media - when everyone is sharing what everyone else is doing, it creates a more vibrant and connected social life. The people that are always out doing things are sharing this information with everyone they know, thus driving demand to live in places where so much is happening. Cities are the ultimate social epicenter.

4. Even when people do have kids, they try to stay in the city for as long as possible - at least until the kids hit kindergarten. Additionally, the schools in the more gentrified neighborhoods are improving quickly, making raising kids in a city a viable option if you can afford the space needed.

5. Community - living in dense neighborhoods creates interactions with your neighbors. You see them more, you interact with them more. Also - I find it a fallacy that suburbs have more community, I actually see the suburbs as being quite transient, especially in the high-tax towns with the good schools where parents tend to move somewhere smaller and cheaper as soon as the kids graduate.

I shared my thoughts on why I actually think our semi-urban lifestyle is actually better for kids, but this really depends on how adventurous you want to be with your kids: Cities have more children than the suburbs?

H'mm. I am a "boomer" although I hate that term. I was born and raised in the city of Chicago. Not in the burbs but in the city. My sisters and friends and everyone we knew lived there and went to school there. Some of their kids stayed in the city and some moved to the burbs.

City schools always were well attended. There were good neighborhoods and bad. Neighborhoods changed. But not always due to gentrification. That's a fairly new phenomenon. In the past it was simply one ethnic group moving out and one moving in. So it was for decades and in some cities it still is.

I think what you are describing is more of a recent occurrence beginning maybe around the 60's or maybe the 70's but it certainly was not always the case. As a matter of fact, when I attended the Chicago public schools in the 50's and 60's they were considered one of the top rated and mine were in economically lower middle class blue collar neighborhoods. We lived in a total of three.

Sure some people moved to the 'burbs but most like the ones we were content to stay in the city in those times.
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Old 01-03-2013, 04:25 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
H'mm. I am a "boomer" although I hate that term. I was born and raised in the city of Chicago. Not in the burbs but in the city. My sisters and friends and everyone we knew lived there and went to school there. Some of their kids stayed in the city and some moved to the burbs.

City schools always were well attended. There were good neighborhoods and bad. Neighborhoods changed. But not always due to gentrification. That's a fairly new phenomenon. In the past it was simply one ethnic group moving out and one moving in. So it was for decades and in some cities it still is.

I think what you are describing is more of a recent occurrence beginning maybe around the 60's or maybe the 70's but it certainly was not always the case. As a matter of fact, when I attended the Chicago public schools in the 50's and 60's they were considered one of the top rated and mine were in economically lower middle class blue collar neighborhoods. We lived in a total of three.

Sure some people moved to the 'burbs but most like the ones we were content to stay in the city in those times.
Going to go out on a limb and guess you're from the north side (and not south or west)
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