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Old 12-23-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 14,597,380 times
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For most young people graduating college and moving to a new city, high walkability is near or at the top of their list. Many would prefer to not even have to own a car and simply use public transportation to get around wherever they can't walk to. I think walkable neighborhoods are great, but why is there such obsession with it to the point that anywhere not walkable is considered a backwards wasteland? Is it political i.e. carbon emissions and global warming? Is it because most were raised in suburbia? Phoenix comes to mind as the city has so much to offer yet is so trashed mostly due to lacking an abundance of walkable neighborhoods. Even if I could live in a walkable neighborhood, which I think I would enjoy, I would still want to own a car to drive to places I couldn't walk to without having to wait on public transportation.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Who says the younger generation has an aversion to autocentric cities? Are there any studies supporting this?
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:07 PM
 
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Because those are generally the areas that has all of the nightlife and vibrancy of seeing other people. It's the energy. Young people like energy and suburbs don't provide this.

Suburbs are for quieter living. Cities are for more energetic living. Plus sometimes, it's better to take a walk then to drive all the time. It's actually more healthier too.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Cars cost money.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 14,597,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Because those are generally the areas that has all of the nightlife and vibrancy of seeing other people. It's the energy. Young people like energy and suburbs don't provide this.

Suburbs are for quieter living. Cities are for more energetic living. Plus sometimes, it's better to take a walk then to drive all the time. It's actually more healthier too.
I can see this. You can easily drive to great nightlife in Phoenix but then you have to worry about a DUI afterwards or have a designated driver. In walkable neighborhoods that's not a necessity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Cars cost money.
The premium you pay for rent in a hip, walkable neighborhood many times costs more than a cheap car payment.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:33 PM
 
8,637 posts, read 8,771,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
I can see this. You can easily drive to great nightlife in Phoenix but then you have to worry about a DUI afterwards or have a designated driver. In walkable neighborhoods that's not a necessity.



The premium you pay for rent in a hip, walkable neighborhood many times costs more than a cheap car payment.
unless you want to live in a car, you need living space+ a car
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:07 PM
 
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I don't like being bored, and I don't like traveling inconvenient distances to get to the places that aren't boring.
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:12 PM
 
Location: classified
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Well speaking for myself it is nice to not have to get into your car everytime you have to go to work or run an errand. Also it makes it easier to enjoy the different nightlife options and not having to worry about either drinking/driving or having a "designated driver".
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Ottawa, IL ➜ Tucson, AZ ➜ Laramie, WY
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As someone who fits the description in the OP, I guess I'm the opposite. I've been all over the US, and Phoenix is by far my favorite city, and even if I lived in NYC I'd want to have a car, so I guess I'm an anomaly. All that being said though, I would prefer to live within walking distance to where ever I work, but I would never want to rely on public transportation (check out worldstarhiphop if you're wondering why).
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Old 12-23-2012, 03:48 PM
 
Location: NYC
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I don't necessarily think it's ALL younger people who feel that way, but I do know quite a few, and I think the explanation is different for everyone.

For instance, for me, I can't drive. I'm legally blind. So a city with high walkability and good public transit is essential (I live in NYC for this reason). Many of my friends in NYC love not having to drive - they see it as a benefit of the city. Other reasons I've heard from my friends who choose to live in a walkable city/not to have a car:

1. Cost. I know lots of people who would much rather pay to live in a walkable city than to pay for a car.

2. They just don't like driving. I hear this A LOT from people my age (I'm 21). I don't think it's generational so much as personal. Some people just dont' like to drive or have anxiety about it, so they pick cities where they don't need to.

3. Carbon emission. Living in the north east, I hear this reason a lot. I heard it far less in the south, where I grew up.

4. They'd just rather walk. Its basic, but it's common. I know lots of people who would just rather walk than drive - they enjoy walking and like being able to walk wherever they need as opposed to driving.


LIke I said. I don't actually think it's a generational thing. I just think it depends on the person and the financial situation and all that. I know that when I go home to Kentucky to visit, all of my friends drive and one of them even told me, "I could never live somewhere without my car." So it depends on the person, really.
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