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Old 12-28-2012, 01:05 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
797 posts, read 1,160,868 times
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This is for city limits only in 1940 and has density listed:
---------------------------------------------------------------
| | | | Density
| | | Land |(average
| | | area | popula-
| | | (sq. | tion per
Rank | Place 1/ |Population | miles)|sq. mile)
---------------------------------------------------------------
1 New York city, NY *...... 7,454,995 299.0 24,933
2 Chicago city, IL......... 3,396,808 206.7 16,434
3 Philadelphia city, PA.... 1,931,334 127.2 15,183
4 Detroit city, MI......... 1,623,452 137.9 11,773
5 Los Angeles city, CA..... 1,504,277 448.3 3,356
6 Cleveland city, OH....... 878,336 73.1 12,016
7 Baltimore city, MD....... 859,100 78.7 10,916
8 St. Louis city, MO....... 816,048 61.0 13,378
9 Boston city, MA.......... 770,816 46.1 16,721
10 Pittsburgh city, PA...... 671,659 52.1 12,892

11 Washington city, DC...... 663,091 61.4 10,800
12 San Francisco city, CA... 634,536 44.6 14,227
13 Milwaukee city, WI....... 587,472 43.4 13,536
14 Buffalo city, NY......... 575,901 39.4 14,617
15 New Orleans city, LA..... 494,537 199.4 2,480
16 Minneapolis city, MN..... 492,370 53.8 9,152
17 Cincinnati city, OH...... 455,610 72.4 6,293
18 Newark city, NJ.......... 429,760 23.6 18,210
19 Kansas City city, MO..... 399,178 58.6 6,812
20 Indianapolis city, IN.... 386,972 53.6 7,220

21 Houston city, TX......... 384,514 72.8 5,282
22 Seattle city, WA......... 368,302 68.5 5,377
23 Rochester city, NY....... 324,975 34.8 9,338
24 Denver city, CO.......... 322,412 57.9 5,568
25 Louisville city, KY...... 319,077 37.9 8,419
26 Columbus city, OH........ 306,087 39.0 7,848
27 Portland city, OR........ 305,394 63.5 4,809
28 Atlanta city, GA......... 302,288 34.7 8,711
29 Oakland city, CA......... 302,163 52.8 5,723
30 Jersey City city, NJ..... 301,173 14.3 21,061

31 Dallas city, TX.......... 294,734 40.6 7,259
32 Memphis city, TN......... 292,942 45.6 6,424
33 St. Paul city, MN........ 287,736 52.2 5,512
34 Toledo city, OH.......... 282,349 37.1 7,610
35 Birmingham city, AL...... 267,583 50.2 5,330
36 San Antonio city, TX..... 253,854 35.7 7,111
37 Providence city, RI...... 253,504 17.9 14,162
38 Akron city, OH........... 244,791 53.7 4,558
39 Omaha city, NE........... 223,844 38.9 5,754
40 Dayton city, OH.......... 210,718 23.7 8,891

The list continues to 100 cities.

http://www.census.gov/population/www...0027/tab17.txt
Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places In The United States: 1790 to 1990

Also if you really want to focus on urban development, then you could go to earlier census dates like 1920 or earlier.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:09 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,628,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the Instigator View Post
Whoaa! Am I seeing things or was Boston at 1.7 million in 1940! If this is true then Boston takes the cake
That's the the metro population. Boston had 770,816 people in 1940.

San Francisco had 634,536 people in 1940. San Francisco has actually continued to gain people and is now at it's peak population around 812,000. They were still developing the west side of San Francisco(Sunset District) in the 1940s, so the whole city limits hadn't even been filled in yet.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:09 PM
 
933 posts, read 1,609,108 times
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Why the asterisk next to New York?

What's really amazing is how much of the metro population cities used to make up. Before the widespread cars and Levittowns, the metros were pretty much all city.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:20 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,628,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTA88 View Post
Why the asterisk next to New York?

What's really amazing is how much of the metro population cities used to make up. Before the widespread cars and Levittowns, the metros were pretty much all city.
Yeah, it's interesting in most places--including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Detroit, Seattle, and so on---the main city is counted as making up well over 3/4 of the total metro population in 1940. A lot of cities were just surrounded by modest farm communities or small towns at the time...

Though on the other hand, I'd like to know how they counted metro population in 1940 and what the boundaries of each were defined as. Because commuting patterns and distances are something that has greatly increased what's considered a metro. In the 1940s it was still basically as far as the street car would take you that would allow a commute. I mean does the New York metro of 1940 count that huge chunk of Northern New Jersey and Long Island? How far does LA metro stretch as of 1940--is Orange County considered a part of it yet?
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,122,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Yeah, it's interesting in most places--including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Detroit, Seattle, and so on---the main city is counted as making up well over 3/4 of the total metro population in 1940. A lot of cities were just surrounded by modest farm communities or small towns at the time...

Though on the other hand, I'd like to know how they counted metro population in 1940 and what the boundaries of each were defined as. Because commuting patterns and distances are something that has greatly increased what's considered a metro. In the 1940s it was still basically as far as the street car would take you that would allow a commute. I mean does the New York metro of 1940 count that huge chunk of Northern New Jersey and Long Island? How far does LA metro stretch as of 1940--is Orange County considered a part of it yet?
I believe in 1940 the San Fernando Valley was basically empty but still part of city limits, explaining why LA is such a crazy outlier in density within the top 10 (it also was developed less densely but not to that extent).

I would guess Orange County would not be counted as the metro - I believe most of the growth there came in 50s / 60s. Anaheim had 11k people in 1940 and Santa Ana had 30k. The metro probably only extended through the Gateway Cities to the Southeast.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:34 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,628,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I believe in 1940 the San Fernando Valley was basically empty but still part of city limits, explaining why LA is such a crazy outlier in density within the top 10 (it also was developed less densely but not to that extent).

I would guess Orange County would not be counted as the metro - I believe most of the growth there came in 50s / 60s. Anaheim had 11k people in 1940 and Santa Ana had 30k. The metro probably only extended through the Gateway Cities to the Southeast.
Yeah, I just looked it up and Orange County only had 130,000 people in 1940. It grew from 216,000 to 703,000 people just from 1950 to 1960. So as of 1940, Orange County wouldn't even had made that big a dent in LA's total metro population if it was counted. Hard to believe that in 1950 it was about the same population size as the Medford, Oregon metro is today.

It had 1.4 million by 1970, over ten times what it had in 1940. Damn...
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
797 posts, read 1,160,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BTA88 View Post
Why the asterisk next to New York?

What's really amazing is how much of the metro population cities used to make up. Before the widespread cars and Levittowns, the metros were pretty much all city.
The list says asterisk means "see notes for individual places" which is near the bottom of here: Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places In The United States: 1790 to 1990.

It is kind of hard to understand but I think it is related to the different borough populations, specifically Brooklyn.
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Old 12-28-2012, 05:43 PM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,422,235 times
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"metropolitan districts" by the Census
Population, the growth of metropolitan districts in the United States: 1900-1940 - Warren Simpson Thompson, United States. Bureau of the Census - Google Books

1940
Houston - 510,397... 1,024.3 sq mi
Atlanta - 442,294... 237.8 sq mi
Louisville 434, 408... 434.4 sq mi
Birmingham - 407,851... 347.8 sq mi
Dallas 376,548... 549.48 sq mi
Memphis 332, 477... 288.1 sq mi

1930
Louisville - 404,396... 484,395 sq mi
Atlanta - 370, 920... 221.31 sq mi
Birmingham - 362, 717... 307.86 sq mi
Houston - 339,216... 799.20 sq mi
Dallas - 309,638... 504.48 sq mi
Memphis - 276, 377... 22116 sq mi

1920
Louisville - 318,159... 234.6 sq mi
Birmingham - 265,772... 307.9 sq mi
Atlanta - 249,220... 133.2 sq mi
Memphis - 214,189... 221.2 sq mi
Dallas - 195,565... 204.4 sq mi
Houston - 171,062... 780.8 sq mi

1910
Louisville - 236,154... 221.1 sq mi
Birmingham - 208,066... 307.9 sq mi
Atlanta - 185,235... 133.2 sq mi
Memphis - 159,474... 221.1 sq mi
Dallas - no data
Houston - no data

I don't think that peakbagger site is correct. Note New Orleans was still large then them all, I got lazy on the data.
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Old 12-28-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,684,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
Yeah, it's interesting in most places--including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Detroit, Seattle, and so on---the main city is counted as making up well over 3/4 of the total metro population in 1940. A lot of cities were just surrounded by modest farm communities or small towns at the time...

Though on the other hand, I'd like to know how they counted metro population in 1940 and what the boundaries of each were defined as. Because commuting patterns and distances are something that has greatly increased what's considered a metro. In the 1940s it was still basically as far as the street car would take you that would allow a commute. I mean does the New York metro of 1940 count that huge chunk of Northern New Jersey and Long Island? How far does LA metro stretch as of 1940--is Orange County considered a part of it yet?
Doubtful. The population of OC was 140k in 1940. Most of L.A. County was pretty disconnected then, to say nothing of OC.

You can get a sense of what OC looked like in the 1950's (pop: 217k) in this clip. At the 1:00 mark:


Construction History of Disneyland - YouTube

By 1970, the population was up 1.4 million, monster growth! LA/OC is definitely a case of two seperate areas coming together.
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Old 12-28-2012, 07:34 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by the Instigator View Post
I think the population pertains to the metro.
Edit: I know see it pertains to city limits, Chicago, Baltimore, Cleveland, Pitts and St. Louis are the most impressive
The numbers apparently pertain to the metros, b/c Pittsburgh's highest city population was 676,806 in 1950. Its 1940 population was 671,659. The steel bust, suburbanization and smaller family sizes contributed to Pittsburgh's massive population loss. It is now at ~305,000, less than half its highest pop.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburgh
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