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Old 01-02-2013, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayess1 View Post
The Q was "city" vs. "sprawl", which I take to mean suburb/exurb/rural.
not rural
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:32 AM
 
3,944 posts, read 4,037,693 times
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Quote:
If, in Dallas or Houston, I didn't want to live in car-oriented suburban style neighborhood, but wanted to live in a place where I could walk to at least some of my everyday needs, how much opportunity would I have to live in such a neighborhood?
Dallas has a district called "uptown" where you can walk to all your needs or take the DART train if you worked in the CBD. Approx 40,000 people live in the Uptown/CBD extended area. It's not that many, but I've been to Boston and Baltimore, and outside the small touristy areas, I wouldn't describe the feeling of the city as that different. Baltimore especially. However, the DFW metro area is larger than the state of Massachusetts, with about the same population, so that's the sprawl.

Last edited by TheOverdog; 01-02-2013 at 09:40 AM..
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:38 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,098,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOverdog View Post
Dallas has a district called "uptown" where you can walk to all your needs or take the DART train if you worked in the CBD. Approx 40,000 people live in the Uptown/CBD extended area. It's not that many, but I've been to Boston and Baltimore, and outside the small touristy areas, I wouldn't describe the feeling of the city as that different. Baltimore especially. However, the DFW metro area is larger than the state of Massachusetts, with about the same population, so that's the sprawl.
The residential neighborhoods of Baltimore and Houston are nothing alike.
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:45 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
The residential neighborhoods of Baltimore and Houston are nothing alike.
And I doubt the residential neighborhoods of Boston have much similarity to ones in Houston...

Five miles from Downtown and spread out and not even sidewalks!

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=houst...18.67,,0,-5.97

and Boston:

https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=B...325.69,,0,0.36
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:20 PM
bu2
 
9,980 posts, read 6,428,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
The slanging match is entertaining, but here's a question, genuinely a question. If, in Dallas or Houston, I didn't want to live in car-oriented suburban style neighborhood, but wanted to live in a place where I could walk to at least some of my everyday needs, how much opportunity would I have to live in such a neighborhood? I'd like this neighborhood not to have too high a crime rate, and I'm particularly interested in being able to walk to a supermarket and a frequent bus or train line.
Yes.

Quite a few places depending on your definition of frequent. Every 5 minutes 24 hours a day, no.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Yes.

Quite a few places depending on your definition of frequent. Every 5 minutes 24 hours a day, no.
I couldn't get every 5 minutes 24 hours a day in New York or San Francisco. What I could get is every 10 minutes (maybe even a little more frequently) from early in the morning to the evening, and 24 hour service--bus service except in New York or Chicago.

Service every 10 minutes is considered "schedule free," frequent enough that you don't have to worry about the schedule. Service every 15 minutes is considered about the outer boundary of "frequent", and is often used in transit agency maps of frequent service.
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Old 01-06-2013, 03:35 AM
 
1,027 posts, read 1,648,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Danes View Post
I've visted the south and it seems like all of the major cities are nothing but sprawling cities. Lots of sbdivisions and bland look and feel.

Not a lot of character. Atalnta, Dallas, Houston all seem to mirror one another. IN addition Charlotte does have anything special about it neither.


Look at places like Philly, Dc Boston or NYC. Those cities are unique and have unique and noticable differences.


What's the apeal about the south?

It the grid system that that makes it look so strange !! It mostly the south west that is very big on grid system where south east (florida) is not base on grid system. I believe there was similar thread that road network of walking paths and back in days trails where converted into road network and that is why south east part US is such mess.

Places like Alabama ,Georgia and South Carolina are big mess .
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Old 01-06-2013, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
10,821 posts, read 15,122,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Danes View Post
I've visted the south and it seems like all of the major cities are nothing but sprawling cities. Lots of sbdivisions and bland look and feel.

Not a lot of character. Atalnta, Dallas, Houston all seem to mirror one another. IN addition Charlotte does have anything special about it neither.


Look at places like Philly, Dc Boston or NYC. Those cities are unique and have unique and noticable differences.


What's the apeal about the south?

Why not phrase the question to why people are leaving places "like Philly, DC, Boston or NYC" for the south?

Lower cost of living, less "tenements", more modern facilities, less congestion, less population density, better highways, newer and well managed infrastructure, lower taxes, better weather; cities may be larger, but they are cleaner and people are friendlier. The northeastern part of the country is older and crowded and pretty much a rat race. (Exception: Florida. The oppressively hot rat race full of northeasterners and midwesterners. Florida is not the "real south". It's another country.)

For all the positive reasons others have already stated in this thread.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Why not phrase the question to why people are leaving places "like Philly, DC, Boston or NYC" for the south?

Lower cost of living, less "tenements", more modern facilities, less congestion, less population density, better highways, newer and well managed infrastructure, lower taxes, better weather; cities may be larger, but they are cleaner and people are friendlier. The northeastern part of the country is older and crowded and pretty much a rat race. (Exception: Florida. The oppressively hot rat race full of northeasterners and midwesterners. Florida is not the "real south". It's another country.)

For all the positive reasons others have already stated in this thread.
Well you could phrase the question that way, but every single one of those Northeastern cities and their metropolitan areas had an increase in population in the 2010 Census. So obviously people aren't fleeing them for the South.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:52 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,819,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QuilterChick View Post
Florida is not the "real south". It's another country.
Not so far as that. South Florida is just an annex of New Jersey with nicer weather.
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