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Old 01-07-2013, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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^^ still, it was virtually nothing compared with most other cities outside of the northeast.
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Old 01-07-2013, 09:25 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
^^ still, it was virtually nothing compared with most other cities outside of the northeast.
You are probably right. But it seems no city survived that period "unharmed". Most Northern cities just had more older architecture to tear down compared to most Southern cities. But Southern cities did tear down many buildings. Most Southern cities had the typical stuff. Interstates cutting through neighborhoods. Tearing down older neighborhoods for housing projects, parks, etc. Tearing down downtown buildings for parking lots. Then a bunch of other random old buildings torn down. For cities that did not have the abundance of older architecture to begin with (Houston, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc.) it was pretty bad. New Orleans had a lot of the same stuff (except it has a much greater abundance of older architecture) and its downtown never looked this bad.

Houston:
http://www.ecoplan.org/graphics/parking-houston.jpg

Atlanta:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2547788489_9c97a5054e_o.jpg

Charlotte:
http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/k...rlotte1975.jpg
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Old 01-07-2013, 09:55 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,543,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
You are probably right. But it seems no city survived that period "unharmed". Most Northern cities just had more older architecture to tear down compared to most Southern cities. But Southern cities did tear down many buildings. Most Southern cities had the typical stuff. Interstates cutting through neighborhoods. Tearing down older neighborhoods for housing projects, parks, etc. Tearing down downtown buildings for parking lots. Then a bunch of other random old buildings torn down. For cities that did not have the abundance of older architecture to begin with (Houston, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc.) it was pretty bad. New Orleans had a lot of the same stuff (except it has a much greater abundance of older architecture) and its downtown never looked this bad.

Houston:
http://www.ecoplan.org/graphics/parking-houston.jpg

Atlanta:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2547788489_9c97a5054e_o.jpg

Charlotte:
http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/k...rlotte1975.jpg
Great parking pictures. I'm sure New Orleans did lose a lot, although at least they managed to preserve the greatest treasure--the French Quarter--with historic preservation regulation starting in the 1930's. I assume that the Garden District survived because it was an elite residential neighborhood that nobody wanted to mess with.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: New Orleans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Great parking pictures. I'm sure New Orleans did lose a lot, although at least they managed to preserve the greatest treasure--the French Quarter--with historic preservation regulation starting in the 1930's. I assume that the Garden District survived because it was an elite residential neighborhood that nobody wanted to mess with.
Yeah, the French Quarter and the Garden District were thankfully preserved. In the early 1900s the French Quarter was actually in decay and was populated by a lot of poor immigrants. Then people started to appreciate the area more and that historic commission was founded. But the area still saw some demolitions. For example, the area that the French Quarter preservation commission was in charge of was reduced a little bit, so buildings could be torn down and new ones built (along Canal Street and the Mississippi river). There are some big non-historic intrusions in the French Quarter too. There was even a proposal to build an elevated highway along the Mississippi river in front of the French Quarter in the 1960s. In the 1930s (a little early for urban renewal) the area directly northwest of the French Quarter was torn down for a housing project (the infamous Storyville district). Also another area directly northwest of the French Quarter was torn down in the 1960s for a park. Those areas looked like they had some very nice architecture.

Last edited by Jimbo_1; 01-07-2013 at 11:17 PM..
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Looking around at what remains of Houston's older neighbourhoods, it looks like they consisted mostly of small lot bungalows.

Working class homes: Houston, TX, USA - Google Maps
Middle class homes: Houston, TX, USA - Google Maps
More upper middle class: Houston, TX, USA - Google Maps

Surprisingly, many parts of Houston, especially the 2nd, 3rd and 5th ward, seem to have a lot of urban decay.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:09 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The working class homes are probably shotgun houses, a common older southern housing stock, rather than bungalows.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:36 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Baltimore doesn't sprawl.
Are you serious? Think about what's considered the Baltimore metro area. I can drive between Annapolis and Westminster and its all built up suburbs. The same when you drive from Columbia to Havre de Grace. Baltimore's suburbs actually spread out pretty far, and to be honest the growth restrictions actually push sprawl further out if you consider all the people who live in York County Pennsylvania and commute to Towson, Hunt Valley, and Baltimore City.

Baltimore is only debatable, semi-southernish.........but even if you include the Washington DC area as well that area also sprawls very far despite the District and the inner suburbs having the MEtro. If you consider how far the sprawl in Virginia goes toward Fredericksburg and Leesburg and even into West Virginia, how everything from Frederick to Bethesda is built up it also spreads pretty far. Now personally I like lower density living so I don't mind. I actually dislike the government-forced smart growth in Maryland which ahs detracted from the quality of life in the DC area and now they want to push this to the Baltimore area too. I hate what they've done to Rockville and Gaithersburg in the past decade. Hate it. Now in Rockville there are places where you have to pay for parking, that should not be the case in a suburban area. My relatives who live there find that fact unacceptable and they have complained ot the government but to no avail. Nobody in that area wants increased density but the local governments do not care.

By the way there are a lot of Southern cities with a lot of charm like Charleston SC, Savannah, and New Orleans. I think that Philadelphia and most of the places in New Jersey, and New York's outer boroughs are just old, with little historic charm.....just OLD. Baltimore has a few areas of historic charm like Fells Point but most of the city also simply feels old.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post

By the way there are a lot of Southern cities with a lot of charm like Charleston SC, Savannah, and New Orleans. I think that Philadelphia and most of the places in New Jersey, and New York's outer boroughs are just old, with little historic charm.....just OLD. Baltimore has a few areas of historic charm like Fells Point but most of the city also simply feels old.
The issue with places like Baltimore isn't so much that the buildings have little historic charm, it is more that the neighborhoods are usually in a bad state economically. If most of these row houses were just fixed up, they would probably look as charming as ant southern city.
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
The issue with places like Baltimore isn't so much that the buildings have little historic charm, it is more that the neighborhoods are usually in a bad state economically. If most of these row houses were just fixed up, they would probably look as charming as ant southern city.

I agree. People wonder why city neighborhoods looks bad, because no one invest in them. They rather live in the woods and farmlands 30 miles away and bring their problems with them while leaving their old communities to deteriorate and leave their mess to the poor to deal with.

We could see an increase in property values in these neighborhoods that bring in tax revenue that the city desires when investments are made towards neighborhoods and fixing up the houses that are boarded up or abandoned.
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Old 06-05-2013, 02:41 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Population is up in Baltimore for the first time in 60 years. Many neighborhoods are coming back. Many remain blighted. There's a ton of progress being made, with still a lot more to go.
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