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Old 01-11-2013, 08:45 PM
 
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btw. I don't think anyone actually lives in Times Square do they? so maybe that's not a good example of a pedestrian plaza. Isn't Times Square an exclusively commercial area? not sure about that. neighbors can't talk to each other if no one lives there haha so obviously what I said wouldn't apply there.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You also seem to be unaware of the fact that a lot of food can be grown in a very small space.
compared to a farm though, a typical front yard of a medium to large lot home in the suburb is a very small space for growing food. the next step down is the small lot home with a tiny front yard in the city and that's kinda pushing it for growing food. it might be possible to grow food there but I think few would feel comfortable working a garden in such a tiny space. but if it can be done then great.

I think food is a good way to bring people together. in city or suburb, growing a vegetable garden in your front yard puts you in a potential social situation where you can be seen outside by your neighbors and that encourages them to go up and interact with you and gets you out of your house. and who doesn't like to talk about food?
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Farms grow tremendous amounts of food though, compared to how much the farmers consume. I think in this case, we're mostly talking about growing a few herbs/vegetables for personal consumption. When my family had a vegetable garden with tomatoes and a few kinds of herbs, it only took up an area maybe 5 by 15 feet, but again, it only provided tomatoes and herbs, and not during the winter. Everything else came from the supermarket.

I don't think traffic or congestion is such a problem in the city though, most residential streets in the cities I'm familiar with have relatively little traffic (outside downtown).
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Old 01-12-2013, 12:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
compared to a farm though, a typical front yard of a medium to large lot home in the suburb is a very small space for growing food. the next step down is the small lot home with a tiny front yard in the city and that's kinda pushing it for growing food. it might be possible to grow food there but I think few would feel comfortable working a garden in such a tiny space. but if it can be done then great.

I think food is a good way to bring people together. in city or suburb, growing a vegetable garden in your front yard puts you in a potential social situation where you can be seen outside by your neighbors and that encourages them to go up and interact with you and gets you out of your house. and who doesn't like to talk about food?
It brings people together anyway. We're always sharing; that's been the case wherever...forever. I find a bag of loquat at the front door with a note. I reciprocate with a bunch of eggplant. Of course, nobody shares tomatoes because everyone grows tomatoes and dumping excess on a neighbor would almost be rude! Now I know the different suburbs I lived in can't be unique to me in that regard.
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I don't think people in urban areas socialize with their neighbors anymore than suburbanites do so I don't want to single out the suburbs but since the thread is about front yards that's who I was referring to. urban streets in North American cities are more walkable than in the suburbs but they still tend to be very congested with automobiles. urbanites don't like standing around talking to each other over the noise of heavy automobile traffic. so they tend to use the sidewalks and the streets strictly as a tool to get from point A to point B (by walking or driving) not as a social meeting place. using the streets as soical meeting places tends to tends happen in cities that have a lot of carfree pedestrian plazas and pedestrian-only streets and US cities are not at all known for their great public plazas and squares. the only well-known one I can think of is Times Square but again that is an area that caters primarily to the automobile and is notorious for its traffic congestion.
Growing vegetables in the yard, front or back, has little to do with whether you socialize with your neighbors or not, the amount of traffic on the street, or Times Square. What does any of that nonsense have to do with growing food in the front yard?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
compared to a farm though, a typical front yard of a medium to large lot home in the suburb is a very small space for growing food.
Compared to an elephant, a mouse is a very small animal. What's your point?

Quote:
the next step down is the small lot home with a tiny front yard in the city and that's kinda pushing it for growing food. it might be possible to grow food there but I think few would feel comfortable working a garden in such a tiny space.
My grandfather grew enough food for 15 people on a 30x120 lot. What's your point?
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Growing vegetables in the yard, front or back, has little to do with whether you socialize with your neighbors or not, the amount of traffic on the street, or Times Square. What does any of that nonsense have to do with growing food in the front yard?
that went over your head, and it was a response to katiana's comment about the social aspects of front yards and gardening which was brought up by another poster. don't worry about it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Compared to an elephant, a mouse is a very small animal. What's your point?

the point is 'very small space' is a subjective and relative term.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
My grandfather grew enough food for 15 people on a 30x120 lot. What's your point?
sounds a bit far-fetched. 15 people depend on that small lot for all of their food? were they all vegetarians? I think you would need a lot more space than that for raising livestock if they ate meat.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunjee View Post
It brings people together anyway. We're always sharing; that's been the case wherever...forever. I find a bag of loquat at the front door with a note. I reciprocate with a bunch of eggplant. Of course, nobody shares tomatoes because everyone grows tomatoes and dumping excess on a neighbor would almost be rude! Now I know the different suburbs I lived in can't be unique to me in that regard.
do you live in a small town or on a farm? and what does a loquat taste like?
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
sounds a bit far-fetched. 15 people depend on that small lot for all of their food? were they all vegetarians? I think you would need a lot more space than that for raising livestock if they ate meat.
Chickens don't need so much space, and were once common in American front lawns. And you can eat the rabbits which you catch trying to eat your vegetables. But it's a lot of work raising food on a small scale; in my area it'd be a full-time job keeping the rabbits, squirrels, and deer from eating all the vegetation and the foxes, coyotes, and feral cats from eating the chickens.
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Old 01-12-2013, 04:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Chickens don't need so much space, and were once common in American front lawns. And you can eat the rabbits which you catch trying to eat your vegetables. But it's a lot of work raising food on a small scale; in my area it'd be a full-time job keeping the rabbits, squirrels, and deer from eating all the vegetation and the foxes, coyotes, and feral cats from eating the chickens.

is it even possible to survive on chicken and eggs and small game as your sole sources of protein? maybe but you're not going to get a whole lot of nourishment out of that. that's definitely at the low end poverty-level of farming. you can easily over-farm and deplete the soil very quickly for example if you don't have enough free land to do crop rotation and you risk starvation when nothing grows there anymore.


Eat Drink Better | Self Sufficiency: How Much Land to Feed Your Family? | Page: 1 | Eat Drink Better

according to this chart you need a minimum of 90 thousand square feet or 2 acres for a subsistence farm to support a healthy family of four.
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Old 01-13-2013, 12:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
do you live in a small town or on a farm? and what does a loquat taste like?
Loquat tastes like soft creamy apples, really sweet. But I like a crisp apple myself. Didn't you or your parents ever grow fruits or vegetables in backyard? You don't need farmland. There's even vertical gardening now. And it's common in the 'burbs to share, but your neighbors are only as neighborly as you are yourself. Lots of gardening in O.C. but if you don't think so you can complain to Sunset Magazine headquarters in Walnut.

It's night right now and I'm gorging on sweet navel oranges from the tree and the juice is cold. It's a good crop but there's not enough to give away. BTW, until recently my sister kept two hens for eggs and as pets in Long Beach.
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