U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-13-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,260 times
Reputation: 741

Advertisements

Good is living in denser urban areas where you wont take up farmland
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-13-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,114 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Well, you could live in an urban area and have a window farm. I also have friends here (NYC) who have pretty massive rooftop farms growing more carrots and tomatoes and other things than they can really use year after year (they do can and pickle and give to friends though).

I think it'd be great if part of the push for pushing local edibles in your yard was also pushing for edibles native to the area. There are a huge variety of plants and such that were formerly used for food and other things in pretty much all stretches of the US, but became less commonly or completely unused as time went on especially as the Native Americans met their demise or moved to reservations and government subsistence. I think with contemporary horticultural practices and culinary techniques, a lot of these plants can be revived, yields improved, and dishes explored. My favorite among the plants native to the US but having very little cultivation (due to them not being able to survive the industrial farm system since they must be eaten quickly after plucking from the tree) is the paw paw which was also the favorite of founding fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.

Here's a pic:


There are plenty of other plants that could be used out there and one good resource is the works of Euell Gibbons such as Stalking the Wild Asparagus which are also very entertaining reads.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 12:56 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
Good is living in denser urban areas where you wont take up farmland
Tell me once more, good and faithful mod, that there aren't people on this forum "celebrating density".
****************************

I once posted a link that showed there is no shortage of farmland. There is an over-supply of food in this country if anything. Farmers get paid to let their land go idle. This has been happening since the depression, and I mean the depression of the 1930s, not the recession of 2008.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,114 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Tell me once more, good and faithful mod, that there aren't people on this forum "celebrating density".
****************************

I once posted a link that showed there is no shortage of farmland. There is an over-supply of food in this country if anything. Farmers get paid to let their land go idle. This has been happening since the depression, and I mean the depression of the 1930s, not the recession of 2008.
Can you repost that link? I know land is laid fallow for a while and then rotated, but I'm guessing that's not what you're referring to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 03:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Can you repost that link? I know land is laid fallow for a while and then rotated, but I'm guessing that's not what you're referring to.
It's old, but here it is:

Farmland Farmland Everywhere: Study Finds No Shortage of Farmland In US | Competitive Enterprise Institute
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,272,260 times
Reputation: 741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Tell me once more, good and faithful mod, that there aren't people on this forum "celebrating density".
****************************

I once posted a link that showed there is no shortage of farmland. There is an over-supply of food in this country if anything. Farmers get paid to let their land go idle. This has been happening since the depression, and I mean the depression of the 1930s, not the recession of 2008.
Im joking
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 05:35 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,812,547 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
is it even possible to survive on chicken and eggs and small game as your sole sources of protein?
Chicken + eggs + veggies? Not even difficult. Most small game doesn't have enough fat, but eggs should cover that. I think that lot is a bit small for a subsistence farm too; I'm just pointing out that small lots can yield meat as well as veggies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 06:22 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,094 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunjee View Post
Loquat tastes like soft creamy apples, really sweet. But I like a crisp apple myself. Didn't you or your parents ever grow fruits or vegetables in backyard? You don't need farmland. There's even vertical gardening now. And it's common in the 'burbs to share, but your neighbors are only as neighborly as you are yourself. Lots of gardening in O.C. but if you don't think so you can complain to Sunset Magazine headquarters in Walnut.

It's night right now and I'm gorging on sweet navel oranges from the tree and the juice is cold. It's a good crop but there's not enough to give away. BTW, until recently my sister kept two hens for eggs and as pets in Long Beach.

my parents used to have a small vegetable garden in their backyard. but they didn't share with our neighbors what they grew. as you mentioned, probably because we lived in the suburbs where people tend not to interact with their neighbors very much if at all (not to suggest that people in the city interact with their neighbors more because they generally don't either). my parents shared what they grew with people they knew who came to visit but these were not our neighbors they were friends and relatives who came from out of town to visit. or when we went to visit my grandparents in another city my mom would take some food from the garden to take to her. but again they were not our neighbors.

in contrast to suburbanites people who live in a classical small town where everybody knows each other are more likely to interact with their neighbors, share food with them, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 06:28 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
my parents used to have a small vegetable garden in their backyard. but they didn't share with our neighbors what they grew. as you mentioned, probably because we lived in the suburbs where people tend not to interact with their neighbors very much if at all (not to suggest that people in the city interact with their neighbors more because they generally don't either). my parents shared what they grew with people they knew who came to visit but these were not our neighbors they were friends and relatives who came from out of town to visit. or when we went to visit my grandparents in another city my mom would take some food from the garden to take to her. but again they were not our neighbors.

in contrast to suburbanites people who live in a classical small town where everybody knows each other are more likely to interact with their neighbors, share food with them, etc.
For pity's sake! We have a backyard garden. We often share our produce with our suburban neighbors, and/or take some to work. So do other people I work with, here in the burbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2013, 06:30 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,264,094 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
For pity's sake! We have a backyard garden. We often share our produce with our suburban neighbors, and/or take some to work. So do other people I work with, here in the burbs.
but you live in a small town though not a modern suburb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top