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Old 01-11-2013, 09:08 AM
 
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Take Los Angeles.

It's fabric was changed once before but this was in it's early days. It had the best public transit of it's time. But then it was ripped out and made for the automobile.

Fast forward to now. L.A. is trying to fix it's past mistakes, working on transit and trying to urbanize the city more. Is it possible to curb the autocentric nature of the city? Both the mentality, and the physicality? In other words, making PT more appealing and efficient than the car, and getting people to see that and not be afraid to leave their cars at home and walk a few blocks to a subway station.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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What does "the very fabric" mean?
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
What does "the very fabric" mean?
The purpose in which it was built. The way the city was built up to be. As in, L.A. has an autocentric nature, can we change that?
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:24 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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It seems everytime a new infrastructure proposal gets presented it always gets knocked down by the discussion of budgets, costs, and our national 16 trillion dollar deficit. The thing is many people arn't very educated on the costs of road maintainence and sprawl; you know like road widening, installation of traffic signals, and street lighting. LA has nearly maxed out its sprawl potential which is why it got to the point where its transforming to urban infill.

I think an exceptional city in this regard though is Denver as it seems to have made serious efforts on developing its downtown/inner core with densification and adding rail connections in all directions of its metro area. It's made a big transformation since the 1990's.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Extremely difficult, but not impossible.
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Old 01-11-2013, 12:07 PM
 
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probably too late for them to change, unfortunately. there is just far too much of the existing autocentric sprawl fabric to reverse course now. you can't reverse the Titanic. they have long since surpassed the point of no return.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,062 posts, read 16,078,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano3000X View Post
Take Los Angeles.

It's fabric was changed once before but this was in it's early days. It had the best public transit of it's time. But then it was ripped out and made for the automobile.

Fast forward to now. L.A. is trying to fix it's past mistakes, working on transit and trying to urbanize the city more. Is it possible to curb the autocentric nature of the city? Both the mentality, and the physicality? In other words, making PT more appealing and efficient than the car, and getting people to see that and not be afraid to leave their cars at home and walk a few blocks to a subway station.
Seems you answered your own question.

The question isn't whether it can, but should it. That assumption that it should is generally blindly accepted here. I also never viewed LA as being all that autocentric. Certainly, much of it is. But there are just as many parts that are not. West Hollywood, Wilshire Corridor, Santa Monica, etc., even Silver Lake isn't bad. LA isn't just Irvines.
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Old 01-11-2013, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicano3000X View Post
Is it possible to change the very fabric of a city?
Yes, of course. Every 'living' city is evolving.

[change is constant]
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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It also depends on just how far it has gone in one direction. Like you said a lot of Los Angeles was altered to make way for the prioritization of the vehicle - these areas aren't too hard to change back. Other areas were developed right in the middle of this period and they present a much greater challenge, though you do see it being attempted in the West LA areas of Expo Phase II. I guess we will have to wait and see.

One other example of Los Angeles changing its urban fabric was the very quick densification of much of Central Los Angeles during the 70s-present - I've been watching Dragnet reruns (circa late 60s/early 70s) lately and it looks like a completely different city.
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:20 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Yes, but it takes 50 to 100 years. That’s the whole rationale behind transit-oriented development. The challenge is that it’s expensive, requires massive up-front capital investment, and takes decades to come to fruition, if ever.
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