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Old 01-18-2013, 07:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058

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According to CD's own stats,

Percentage of workers working in this county: 46.1%
Number of people working at home: 4,330 (3.0% of all workers)


Read more: http://www.city-data.com/housing/hou...#ixzz2INqygDub

Now this is a little screwy, as Aurora is a part of three counties (Adams, Arapahoe and Douglas, though there is very little land in Douglas and the majority is in Arapahoe).

For Denver (for comparison sake)
Percentage of workers working in this county: 63.4%
Number of people working at home: 10,225 (3.7% of all workers)


Read more: http://www.city-data.com/housing/hou...#ixzz2INriDrus

Denver is a city/county.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 01-18-2013 at 07:41 PM..
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Old 01-18-2013, 08:00 PM
 
12,295 posts, read 15,187,836 times
Reputation: 8108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
OK, Aurora has 144,000 employed residents, according to the Census. The Denver Regional Council of Governments shows 104,000 jobs as located within Aurora. So the jobs/employed residents ratio is about .7, showing a net out commute. So on the basis of employment it's not a bedroom suburb, but it's not a central city with a net incommute either. It's a little below jobs/housing balance.
Not a bedroom suburb but likely a commercial suburb or corporate suburb. And it could still have a lot of its own residents commuting to Denver.
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No, IRL, people commute INTO Aurora to work at the health science center, Buckley Air Base, et al, and out of Aurora to work at various businesses in the metro Denver area. While there is no downtown, Colfax Avenue is sort of a 'main drag', and there is a city government complex, a performing arts center and other amenities. There are few stand-alone cities half the size of Aurora these days.
By stand alone cities do you mean cities that are they principal city of their own metro area? Because I can think of a lot of cities with roughly half the population of Aurora or less with 10x the downtown, which is easy to do since Aurora has no real downtown, they use Denver's since it's so close.

Jackson, MS
Fort Wayne, IN
Akron, OH
Kalamazoo, MI
Chatanooga, TN
Little Rock, AR

and many more

The major issue to me here, is a city as large as Aurora in population has no proper downtown, it might as well be called "East Denver".
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058
So now having a downtown is the standard? What is it going to be tomorrow? It can always be changed to accommodate any opinion.

It's too late for me to look up each and every one of these cities tonight, but here's some info about Akron:

Akron, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Akron is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area, which in 2010 had a population of 2,780,440.

Not quite stand-alone.

Ft. Wayne:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Wayne,_Indiana
The population was 255,824 as of the July 1, 2011 Census estimate . . . Fort Wayne is the principal city of the Fort Wayne metropolitan area, consisting of Allen, Wells, and Whitley counties, for an estimated population of 419,453.[8] In addition to those three core counties, the combined statistical area includes Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, and Noble counties, for a population of about 615,077.[8]

More than 160,000 people and not quite stand-alone, either.
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Old 01-19-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,513 posts, read 9,049,534 times
Reputation: 5008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So now having a downtown is the standard? What is it going to be tomorrow? It can always be changed to accommodate any opinion.

It's too late for me to look up each and every one of these cities tonight, but here's some info about Akron:

Akron, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Akron is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area, which in 2010 had a population of 2,780,440.

Not quite stand-alone.

Ft. Wayne:
Fort Wayne, Indiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The population was 255,824 as of the July 1, 2011 Census estimate . . . Fort Wayne is the principal city of the Fort Wayne metropolitan area, consisting of Allen, Wells, and Whitley counties, for an estimated population of 419,453.[8] In addition to those three core counties, the combined statistical area includes Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, and Noble counties, for a population of about 615,077.[8]

More than 160,000 people and not quite stand-alone, either.
Akron Ohio is about 40 miles away from Cleveland Ohio. Akron has its very own downtown. It's part of the same metro area due to proximity it has to Cleveland.

Fort Wayne combined 5 counties in its area to obtain its metro population, there are no other large cities in the metro besides Fort Wayne, it very much fits your definition. You didn't list the other two cities, Chatanooga and Jackson, both 10x the downtown of Aurora and both roughly half the size.

I can't think of many cities out there with a population of 300,000 with no visible downtown or skyline. Sounds like a city very dependent on its much larger neighbor to me, but that's just my interpretation.
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Old 01-19-2013, 08:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058
There's plenty of retail in Aurora, just not in a downtown. The two premier hospitals in Colorado are there. We're all interdependent on each other.
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:44 AM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,541,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There's plenty of retail in Aurora, just not in a downtown. The two premier hospitals in Colorado are there. We're all interdependent on each other.
Places in a metro area are interdependent, but they're not all the same. Denver has 411,000 jobs and 309.000 employed residents, meaning that it has a jobs/employed ratio of 1.33. So there's a net in commute of about 100,000 people. This is typical of central cities, though in some the ratio is much higher.

To me, it's useful to have language which distinguishes between cities with a net in commute and those with a net out commute. That's not stigmatizing, it's analysis. Suburb is the commonly used term for places that are low density, car dependent, and don't have a downtown, even if they have a substantial employment base. Call it something something else if you want. But the folks on this board who've posted critiques of the suburbs are still going to have those critiques of that place, whether it's called a suburb or not. If people don't like something, they'll say through a euphemism and critique it.
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Old 01-19-2013, 10:51 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Places in a metro area are interdependent, but they're not all the same. Denver has 411,000 jobs and 309.000 employed residents, meaning that it has a jobs/employed ratio of 1.33. So there's a net in commute of about 100,000 people. This is typical of central cities, though in some the ratio is much higher.

To me, it's useful to have language which distinguishes between cities with a net in commute and those with a net out commute. That's not stigmatizing, it's analysis. Suburb is the commonly used term for places that are low density, car dependent, and don't have a downtown, even if they have a substantial employment base. Call it something something else if you want. But the folks on this board who've posted critiques of the suburbs are still going to have those critiques of that place, whether it's called a suburb or not. If people don't like something, they'll say through a euphemism and critique it.
Suburb is also commonly used for places outside of a "main city" (however that may be defined) that DO have downtowns, and are neither super low-density nor super car dependent. We've discussed this downtown issue before. Some of Denver's burbs have downtowns, some don't. All the burbs that have downtowns are older at the core anyway, but not all the older burbs have downtowns, e.g. Wheat Ridge and Aurora for two. My major objection to the term "suburb" is using it for areas inside the city limits.
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:05 PM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,541,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Suburb is also commonly used for places outside of a "main city" (however that may be defined) that DO have downtowns, and are neither super low-density nor super car dependent. We've discussed this downtown issue before. Some of Denver's burbs have downtowns, some don't. All the burbs that have downtowns are older at the core anyway, but not all the older burbs have downtowns, e.g. Wheat Ridge and Aurora for two. My major objection to the term "suburb" is using it for areas inside the city limits.
Right, there's a group of characteristics that typify suburbs, and any given suburb may not have all of them, but that doesn't mean they're not valid to identify suburbs. But if the objection (which i remember) is to designating areas within central cities as suburbs, even if they have suburban characteristics, what's the objection to designating Aurora as a suburb?
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:15 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Right, there's a group of characteristics that typify suburbs, and any given suburb may not have all of them, but that doesn't mean they're not valid to identify suburbs. But if the objection (which i remember) is to designating areas within central cities as suburbs, even if they have suburban characteristics, what's the objection to designating Aurora as a suburb?
"even if they have suburban characteristics"

Being part of a city should negate the "suburban characteristics", as one of those is "outside the city".
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