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Old 08-21-2015, 02:17 AM
 
Location: Illinois
963 posts, read 444,353 times
Reputation: 266

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A couple of other ones:

Henderson, NV -------> Las Vegas

Tucson, AZ -------> Phoenix

Santa Fe, NM --------> Albuquerque

Huntsville, AL --------> Montgomery

Baton Rouge, LA --------> New Orleans

Are they suburbs or satellite cities of these major cities?

Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Then the term "suburb" has lost all meaning.
Some people have said that suburbs were small to medium sized cities, or cities that have a lower density than most major cities like New York or Chicago or Boston.

Some people have said that they were smaller cities that were somewhat close to a big major city.

What would you call a city that has only 200,000 population (or less), and is very sparsely populated (as in, houses are not close together and most places are far apart and distant from each other)? And it's the only major city within a 150 mile radius? Would you just call it one big suburb in the middle of nowhere?

Last edited by It is 57 below zero; 08-21-2015 at 02:31 AM..
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:02 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,406 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
A couple of other ones:

Henderson, NV -------> Las Vegas

Tucson, AZ -------> Phoenix

Santa Fe, NM --------> Albuquerque

Huntsville, AL --------> Montgomery

Baton Rouge, LA --------> New Orleans

Are they suburbs or satellite cities of these major cities?



Some people have said that suburbs were small to medium sized cities, or cities that have a lower density than most major cities like New York or Chicago or Boston.

Some people have said that they were smaller cities that were somewhat close to a big major city.

What would you call a city that has only 200,000 population (or less), and is very sparsely populated (as in, houses are not close together and most places are far apart and distant from each other)? And it's the only major city within a 150 mile radius? Would you just call it one big suburb in the middle of nowhere?
Henderson is a satellite city that developed separately from LV as a mining town supporting WW2.
It has since been over run by LV sprawl.

Tucson & Santa Fe are neither suburbs or satellite cities. They are independent cities that developed historically and economically total separate from Phoenix & Albuquerque. Neither one falls within the other cities sprawl and they are too far apart for much commuting (yes, I know there is a train and some commuting).

As to your second question, a low density city of 200k that is 150 miles from a major city is not a suburb, although it may be "suburban" in design and layout. Many people do not understand the difference between "suburb" and "suburban", not the same thing at all.
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Old 08-21-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
5,203 posts, read 7,880,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Tucson & Santa Fe are neither suburbs or satellite cities. They are independent cities that developed historically and economically total separate from Phoenix & Albuquerque. Neither one falls within the other cities sprawl and they are too far apart for much commuting (yes, I know there is a train and some commuting).

Note that since 2013, the Santa Fe MSA has been grouped together with the Albuquerque MSA as well as the Las Vegas, Espanola, Grants, and Los Alamos micBullBoxer31 as a single CSA. The Tucson MSA, on the other hand, is still entirely separate from the Phoenix MSA.
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Old 08-21-2015, 02:22 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,348,447 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
A couple of other ones:

Henderson, NV -------> Las Vegas

Tucson, AZ -------> Phoenix

Santa Fe, NM --------> Albuquerque

Huntsville, AL --------> Montgomery

Baton Rouge, LA --------> New Orleans

Are they suburbs or satellite cities of these major cities?



Some people have said that suburbs were small to medium sized cities, or cities that have a lower density than most major cities like New York or Chicago or Boston.

Some people have said that they were smaller cities that were somewhat close to a big major city.

What would you call a city that has only 200,000 population (or less), and is very sparsely populated (as in, houses are not close together and most places are far apart and distant from each other)? And it's the only major city within a 150 mile radius? Would you just call it one big suburb in the middle of nowhere?
I'd call it what you have identified it to be: a city.
Why do you feel compelled to call it something other than a city?
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Old 08-21-2015, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Illinois
963 posts, read 444,353 times
Reputation: 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
I'd call it what you have identified it to be: a city.
Why do you feel compelled to call it something other than a city?
Because the US Census Bureau definition says that a rural area has no more than 1000 people per square mile,

a suburb has over 1000 people per square mile but no more than 3000,

and an (urban) city has over 3000 people per square mile.
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Old 08-21-2015, 04:44 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,406 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Note that since 2013, the Santa Fe MSA has been grouped together with the Albuquerque MSA as well as the Las Vegas, Espanola, Grants, and Los Alamos micBullBoxer31 as a single CSA. The Tucson MSA, on the other hand, is still entirely separate from the Phoenix MSA.

I saw that they were all apart of the same CSA, but that has little bearing on which cities are suburbs, satellite cities or edge cities.
Grant is over 80 miles and Las Vegas is over 100 miles from Albuquerque, with much undeveloped land and mountains in between.
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Old 08-21-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,807,408 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Also a municipality is not generally considered a "suburb". The definition used for suburb above has no relation to the term "suburb".
"Municipality" in many cases is a legal term, denoting whether a government subdivision is incorporated or not. In some states, all government subdivisions are incorporated; in others, it depends.

Whether or not a government subdivision is incorporated or not has nothing to do with its status as a suburb.

Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
A couple of other ones:

Henderson, NV -------> Las Vegas

Tucson, AZ -------> Phoenix

Santa Fe, NM --------> Albuquerque

Huntsville, AL --------> Montgomery

Baton Rouge, LA --------> New Orleans

Are they suburbs or satellite cities of these major cities?
You didn't look at the map before posting again, did you?

Do you even know that two of the cities you ask about are the state capitals?
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Old 08-21-2015, 06:52 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,348,447 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
"Municipality" in many cases is a legal term, denoting whether a government subdivision is incorporated or not. In some states, all government subdivisions are incorporated; in others, it depends.

Whether or not a government subdivision is incorporated or not has nothing to do with its status as a suburb.
If the area is a "government subdivision" then it is not a "suburb" if "suburb" has anything to do with proximity to a political subdivision of the state because it is a political subdivision of the state.

If political subdivision boundaries have no meaning then are you going to have some problems with your definition. If you use "density" as a boundary, the gradations will not have decent resolution and it will not be clear how areas are associated when there is a significant variance in density due to proximity of multiple populous areas.

Seems to me that for the most part the effort to come up with a definition is nothing more than an effort to look for a euphemism or proxy word for "things urbanophiles dislike".
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,807,408 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
If the area is a "government subdivision" then it is not a "suburb" if "suburb" has anything to do with proximity to a political subdivision of the state because it is a political subdivision of the state.
Government subdivision = township, village, town, city, borough, county, parish, or any other term used to describe entities below the state level. All - except counties/parishes, most likely - can be suburbs. Or not. Some may be considered municipalities. Some may not. Usually the terms' definitions depend on the state in question.

None of which has anything to do with suburbs.
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Old 08-23-2015, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,496 posts, read 1,698,631 times
Reputation: 2212
Being a state capital doesn't exclude you from being a suburb, What about Trenton it is right next to Philadelphia, oh wait forgot, that using logic Trenton is a suburb of New York not Philadelphia and it is it's own MSA, yet you can see downtown Philadelphia from a good portion of the county. I know thaty doesn't mean it is part of Philadelphia but it's city borders border Philly.
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