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Old 01-16-2013, 12:59 PM
 
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Well many advocates here and on other message boards who really like highrise buildings and the grid system saying it so urban and non grid system and non highrise building is so suburb like.

I would like to know where the grid system came from and what time .When I was in Europe they where not on the grid system and much of US in the south in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, North and South Carolina so on are not on grid system same with Mexico it like big mess the road network don't know why that is the case.

Many other countries are not on grid system but big old history. The grid system in the US seems more strong in the south west and west coast and place in north.

Also back in time 100 years ago and many countries like in Europe there was no highrise buildings most buildings one to five stories.

So these urban advocates what they really like is modern urban planning.
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Old 01-16-2013, 01:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Well many advocates here and on other message boards who really like highrise buildings and the grid system saying it so urban and non grid system and non highrise building is so suburb like.

I would like to know where the grid system came from and what time .When I was in Europe they where not on the grid system and much of US in the south in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, North and South Carolina so on are not on grid system same with Mexico it like big mess the road network don't know why that is the case.

Many other countries are not on grid system but big old history. The grid system in the US seems more strong in the south west and west coast and place in north.

Also back in time 100 years ago and many countries like in Europe there was no highrise buildings most buildings one to five stories.

So these urban advocates what they really like is modern urban planning.

Interconnected grids are as old as cities. When someone mentions grid it doesn't necessarily mean inform never curving streets. Old gothic quarters had interconnecting streets.

But a more formal grid dates back to the age of reason - think about Paris, DC, London- cities with broad avenues and smaller cross streets.

The grid contrasts with the dendritic system that evolved in the 20th century designed. The dendritic system never offers alternatives. cul de sacs lead to feeders, feeders to collectors, collectors to freeways. In the dendritic system there is only one way to get from A to B. On a grid, there are multiple ways to get from A to B.

As for tall buildings, skyscrapers are a 20th century phenomena due to engineering techniques and availability of things like steel in large quantities.
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Old 01-16-2013, 01:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Interconnected grids are as old as cities. When someone mentions grid it doesn't necessarily mean inform never curving streets. Old gothic quarters had interconnecting streets.

But a more formal grid dates back to the age of reason - think about Paris, DC, London- cities with broad avenues and smaller cross streets.

The grid contrasts with the dendritic system that evolved in the 20th century designed. The dendritic system never offers alternatives. cul de sacs lead to feeders, feeders to collectors, collectors to freeways. In the dendritic system there is only one way to get from A to B. On a grid, there are multiple ways to get from A to B.

As for tall buildings, skyscrapers are a 20th century phenomena due to engineering techniques and availability of things like steel in large quantities.
I dont know what you mean by Interconnected grids or formal grids but Paris is not on grid.

Paris map http://www.hot-map.com/images/tn/Sta...Paris-5677.jpg

Also map of London England http://www.newlondon-tours.com/publi...ee-england.jpg

Lots of streets that come to dead end on the non yellow streets and streets that go all over place no straight line.So non grid.
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Old 01-16-2013, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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A lot of Greek cities are gridded. It was the easy way to divide up flat land.

Athens, Kentrikos Tomeas Athinon, Greece - Google Maps
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Old 01-16-2013, 02:19 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Some European cities adopted a grid in the 19th century when they were considered more "enlightened" compared to the older ungridded cities from medieval times. Look at some of the neighborhoods surrounding Citutat Vella "old city" in Barcelona:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Barce...Spain&t=m&z=13

Madrid has a similar pattern. Manhattan has an older ungridded portion. Back Bay and South End in Boston are gridded late 19th century neighborhoods in an otherwise ungridded city; the city past that continued without a grid, though it looks grid-like and regular. Some older European cities have a grid for sections, but have some exceptions.
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:19 PM
 
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Ben Franklin's plan in the 18th Century for what's now Center City Philadelphia was one of the first large scale grid layouts in the U.S. The street plan for Manhattan, which I believe was laid out in 1811, was another. Grids have many advantages, especially for transit; the Manhattan plan was also designed to create the maximum number of real estate parcels to sell.

The late 19th Century started moving towards highrises, downtown Chicago had some 10-12 story buildings. There was new engineering, there was also new demand to concentrate businesses to that extent. Highrises have been a mostly been a 20th Century story.
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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Grids came around with the industrial age, and skyscrapers, between the 1880s and 1920s
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Old 01-16-2013, 07:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Ben Franklin's plan in the 18th Century for what's now Center City Philadelphia was one of the first large scale grid layouts in the U.S.
Actually 17th century and William Penn, not 18th and Ben Franklin.

But Roman camps had a grid of roads, and Roman surveys were grid based; the idea is very old.

High rise buildings date from the invention of reinforced concrete, I believe, so 19th century.
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Old 01-16-2013, 07:41 PM
 
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But few of the older cities have the cartesian coordinates where streets are straight north-south or east-west. Indeed lower Manhattan, the older city, has angular and disjointed streets. Probably the advent of land surveying.
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Old 01-16-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Here.
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I assumed that by "grid system" you were referring to a grid oriented on north-south-east-west lines.(?) That came from Thomas Jefferson in the 1870s when he developed the Township and Range Survey System for dividing up land west of the Appalachians.
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