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Old 01-20-2013, 12:20 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"The Word of the Lord", eh? I cannot find any corroboration that Mr. Warner invented this term.
There's also the West Philadelphia Historic Streetcar Suburb Historic District

It's labelled as a "streetcar suburb" by the National Register of Historic Places. When it was developed, it was within the city limits of Philadelphia.

Quote:
Roxbury was at one time a separate city, as was Dorchester. Both were in existence before the streetcar. West Roxbury is sometimes referred to as a suburb within the city.
Technically, both Roxbury and Dorchester were separate towns not cities. They were in existence before the streetcar with a much smaller population but I doubt few if anyone commuted into Boston from Roxbury or Dorchester before streetcars.

Regardless, everywhere in Massachusetts is (and was) part of a city or town. Any place that Boston later annexed was a city or town.

 
Old 01-20-2013, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Houston
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I prefer the Burbs. I grew up in an urban area with the "best urban planning in the nation" (Just ask em)


I live in Kingwood. I drive to Spring to work. Kingwood certainly is a master planed community and considered a suburb of Houston. Spring has many qualities of a suburb but, is its own town. Lots of people live in Spring and Kingwood drive to Houston to work.

Does it matter if you drive to work from a suburb or another town to work?

Is the problem that some people prefer trees and large lots? Quiet neighborhoods with friendly neighbors?

I don't understand the rationale that I must live inside a certain boundary to hold a position at a company.

I agree traffic sucks. If people are willing to sit in it so be it. I manage my life to avoid traffic by taking the commute into account when determining the choices I have for a home.

The argument I keep hearing is that suburbs are evil. I cannot understand the hatred people feel for them. I am glad I have the choice. Urban planners need to know not everyone wants to live their dream, No matter how cool it looks to you.
 
Old 01-20-2013, 12:27 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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also this might be a good reference:

http://www.nps.gov/nr/publications/b...fs/Suburbs.pdf
 
Old 01-20-2013, 05:33 AM
 
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I live in the ex-urbs. I get my lazy behind out and bed and go to work in a city with plenty of jobs. I buy older vehicles that are great on gas mileage but are still powerful so I can make good time if necessary. I fix the vehicles myself if they break which is not often. I go home and make sure that I love my family even more to make up for lost time. That is all I can do. I can't afford to live closer.

Last edited by va_lucky; 01-20-2013 at 06:45 AM..
 
Old 01-20-2013, 06:38 AM
 
12,295 posts, read 15,187,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capoeira View Post
Who needs an excuse for living in a suburb?? I strongly prefer living in suburbs because of more yard space and better housing options. My ideal place to live is the exurbs of a medium size city,where civilization meets farmland. In such a place one can easily reach the city center in 20 or 30 minutes and still be in a spacious environment in a modern new house. An example of such a place would be a lake home in Muskego,Wisconsin or White Bear Lake,Minnesota. Exurbs of very big cities are not as desirable though due to the huge traffic congestion(in places like the SF Bay area,Atlanta or Chicago).
I don't know what the boundary is between suburbs and exurbs (50 km outside center city?) but that is true in the outer suburbs of Chicago. Places like Gurnee and S. Elgin the rush hour traffic moves slower than the Kennedy.
 
Old 01-20-2013, 06:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capoeira View Post
Who needs an excuse for living in a suburb?? I strongly prefer living in suburbs because of more yard space and better housing options. My ideal place to live is the exurbs of a medium size city,where civilization meets farmland. In such a place one can easily reach the city center in 20 or 30 minutes and still be in a spacious environment in a modern new house. An example of such a place would be a lake home in Muskego,Wisconsin or White Bear Lake,Minnesota. Exurbs of very big cities are not as desirable though due to the huge traffic congestion(in places like the SF Bay area,Atlanta or Chicago).
Understood, I have a farmhouse, am outside of DC where the traffic congestion is worse than any of the areas you named....I don't have a choice though, so I do what I need to. I work nights!
 
Old 01-20-2013, 07:51 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's also the West Philadelphia Historic Streetcar Suburb Historic District

It's labelled as a "streetcar suburb" by the National Register of Historic Places. When it was developed, it was within the city limits of Philadelphia.



Technically, both Roxbury and Dorchester were separate towns not cities. They were in existence before the streetcar with a much smaller population but I doubt few if anyone commuted into Boston from Roxbury or Dorchester before streetcars.

Regardless, everywhere in Massachusetts is (and was) part of a city or town. Any place that Boston later annexed was a city or town.
I can't keep up with the political structure of all the 50 states. I think you know what I meant, that they were independent of Boston at one time.

***********************************

My beef is with the idea that someone in 1962 "invented" the term "streetcar suburb" and therefore we have to follow HIS definition of it forever.
 
Old 01-20-2013, 09:29 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I can't keep up with the political structure of all the 50 states. I think you know what I meant, that they were independent of Boston at one time.
I said as much the same. My point was that for Dorchester and the other Massachusetts examples most of their development occurred after streetcars were invented and they were not independent, in a commute sense. For Dorchester, 1870 population was 12,000; 1920 150,000.

Quote:
My beef is with the idea that someone in 1962 "invented" the term "streetcar suburb" and therefore we have to follow HIS definition of it forever.
I'm not sure where you got that idea that the term came from one person. The National Register of Historic Places does the same with "West Philadelphia Historic Streetcar Suburb". I mentioned that in the post you quoted!
 
Old 01-20-2013, 09:32 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I don't know what the boundary is between suburbs and exurbs (50 km outside center city?) but that is true in the outer suburbs of Chicago. Places like Gurnee and S. Elgin the rush hour traffic moves slower than the Kennedy.
Interesting. I don't think that's true in many metros. Certainly not true for the Boston and NYC metros.
 
Old 01-20-2013, 10:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No, streetcar suburbs are not located in the metropolitan central city.

In Denver, Five Points, Highlands, West Highlands, Baker, Congress Park, South Pearl and South Gaylord are all considered "Streetcar suburbs" and all are located within the city limits of Denver.

And I agree with Carlite & Komeht that there is a huge difference in the built envirnoment between streetcar suburbs, typically built from 1880s to the 1930s, and postwar suburbs. Not sure what is even debatable about that observation.
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