U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2013, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
1,263 posts, read 1,273,264 times
Reputation: 741

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
In 50 years car culture will seem completely foreign and people will wonder what the hell were we thinking
And hopefully we will all be living in urban areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2013, 08:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
And hopefully we will all be living in urban areas.
That's right. We need to get congress to pass a law forbidding people to live in small towns or rural areas. That's about as likely as getting them to do something about the deficit. "The suburbs" are part of the urban area of any city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,102,417 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"The suburbs" are part of the urban area of any city.
"The suburbs" make up the suburban area, usually outside of city limits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 08:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
"The suburbs" make up the suburban area, usually outside of city limits.
It's all part of the MSA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,102,417 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It's all part of the MSA.
True, but it shouldn't be assumed things are equal on both sides of the city line.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 08:41 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
True, but it shouldn't be assumed things are equal on both sides of the city line.
LOL! So the "city line" does make a difference, no?

In regards to schools, not so much, in regards to location, if not quality. Elementary schools in particular, tend to be located in residential areas both in the city and the suburbs. Many real-estate companies tout "walk to schools" in their house ads. It's still considered desirable to live within walking distance of an elementary school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,102,417 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LOL! So the "city line" does make a difference, no? .
Absolutey. Did I ever argue otherwise?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
In regards to schools, not so much, in regards to location, if not quality. .
Remember, not everywhere has funding of schools like where you live. There is a drastic difference here.

This is the issue - you called the suburbs "part of the urban area of the city." This is patently false because 1) it's not urban and 2) it's usually not in the city.

What is described as "suburban development" usually refers to lower density SFHs, which can and certainly do exist in cities. But when "the suburbs" are referenced, I think it's safe to assume you're talking about someplace outside of city limits.

Where in the city of Denver would you call "the suburbs?" If you're saying it doesn't matter, because it's all part of the same MSA, then why make the distinction at all?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 09:09 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Absolutey. Did I ever argue otherwise?



Remember, not everywhere has funding of schools like where you live. There is a drastic difference here.

This is the issue - you called the suburbs "part of the urban area of the city." This is patently false because 1) it's not urban and 2) it's usually not in the city.

What is described as "suburban development" usually refers to lower density SFHs, which can and certainly do exist in cities. But when "the suburbs" are referenced, I think it's safe to assume you're talking about someplace outside of city limits.

Where in the city of Denver would you call "the suburbs?" If you're saying it doesn't matter, because it's all part of the same MSA, then why make the distinction at all?
This is what makes CD such a trip! A person can express something poorly, and what they said gets taken out of context to attempt to make a point. I said:

"The suburbs" are part of the urban area of any city.

Now considering we have had discussion after discussion about what constitutes an urban area, what constitutes a suburb, etc, I thought I was being very clear when I said that. What I meant was, "the suburbs are a part of any city's MSA". People living in the suburbs are not living in a small town or a rural area. Most people in the suburbs, when asked where they live when traveling will say "Denver" or "suburban Denver" (for example). Many people in the close-in burbs around here refer to the whole area as "Denver". People in Boulder County like to differentiate themselves.

I thought Maryland had a county-wide school system that is generally well funded?
Glad to know you think the suburbs are outside of the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 09:19 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It's all part of the MSA.
Doesn't really matter; MSA follows county lines. What's in the MSA may be rural, suburban, or urban. The urban area follows anywhere built up in or near a central city connected by commute and continuous developement. For whatever reason, people mention MSA more than urban area.

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
"The suburbs" make up the suburban area, usually outside of city limits.
See above. The census defines urban area as a continuous development above 1,000 people per square mile with certain commute thersholds. Suburbs and suburban development are contained within these boundaries.

Urban is used ambigously to mean in contrast to either rural or suburban anywhere built up to some level.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2013, 09:26 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Doesn't really matter; MSA follows county lines. What's in the MSA may be rural, suburban, or urban. The urban area follows anywhere built up in or near a central city connected by commute and continuous developement. For whatever reason, people mention MSA more than urban area.

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yeah, it used to be MSAs were described as (for ex) Denver County and parts of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Douglas, and Jefferson counties. Now they just include the whole county. It's kind of nutty in a way. Part of Boulder County is in Rocky Mountain National Park! Western Jefferson is mountainous with national forest land, Adams and Arap have a lot of farmland to the east, Douglas has a lot of rural areas. I guess it's just simpler to include the whole county.

Quote:
See above. The census defines urban area as a continuous development above 1,000 people per square mile with certain commute thersholds. Suburbs and suburban development are contained within these boundaries.

Urban is used ambigously to mean in contrast to either rural or suburban — anywhere built up to some level.
Now that that's settled!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top