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Old 01-23-2013, 09:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
^^ Wow. Talk about cookie-cutter!
? Looks like a nice block of row homes with some store fronts...I'm not sure cookie cutter is an apt description.
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Old 01-23-2013, 09:52 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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New York City passed a zoning rule requiring retail on the bottom floor of developments on one (or more?) main road in Brooklyn. Unsure whether I agree with the rest of the article (I suspect BajanYankee would disagree strongly) but I like their rather memorable comment on the rule:

If you don’t recall, last year the City Council passed a zoning amendment to require new residential developments on the transit-rich, pedestrian-unfriendly avenue in South Brooklyn to include a certain amount of ground-level retail, to appease the ghost of Jane Jacobs and to stop burning the souls of all who walk the avenue.

Look beyond Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn for solutions to a lack of retail | Market Urbanism
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'll like 'em. As long as the next unit over doesn't look the same.
True. However, that block looks just like a block near where I work, which looks just like a block near where I live, which looks like a block in Cincinnati, which looks like ... Hence my observation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
? Looks like a nice block of row homes with some store fronts...I'm not sure cookie cutter is an apt description.
Quote:
cookie–cutter
adjective
marked by lack of originality or distinction <cookie–cutter shopping malls>
Quote:
cook·ie-cut·ter (kk-ctr)adj. Appearing to be mass-produced; identical in appearance: cookie-cutter tract housing in suburbia.
Quote:
cook·ie-cut·ter[kook-ee-kuht-er]
Show IPA
adjective
1. having the same configuration or look as many others of a given kind; identical: rows of cookie-cutter houses.
2. lacking individuality; stereotyped or formulaic: a novel filled with cookie-cutter characters.
How would you define cookie cutter?
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
True. However, that block looks just like a block near where I work, which looks just like a block near where I live, which looks like a block in Cincinnati, which looks like ... Hence my observation.


How would you define cookie cutter?
The definitions you provided are fine. I just don't find them applicable at all to the pictures.
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,370 posts, read 59,807,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
The definitions you provided are fine. I just don't find them applicable at all to the pictures.
If the buildings in those pictures aren't the "same configuration or design", then what the hell are they? Please enlighten me ...

Last edited by Ohiogirl81; 01-23-2013 at 10:42 AM.. Reason: don't want to give our esteemed moderator any more grey hairs than necessary
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
If the buildings in those pictures aren't the "same configuration or design", then what the hell are they? Please enlighten me ...
To my eye these look like a single edifice with multiple tenancies that share walls. To describe a block of row houses as "cookie cutter" would mean to describe just about every apartment building, condo or other types of buildings as being cookie cutter.

I think cookie cutter is a more apt description when you have block after block of the same manufactured housing, all looking more or less identical or not distinguishable in any real way. Personally, I wouldn't use the term to apply to a contained development with shared walls - unless there was block after block of the same.
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Old 01-23-2013, 10:57 AM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,541,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
New York City passed a zoning rule requiring retail on the bottom floor of developments on one (or more?) main road in Brooklyn. Unsure whether I agree with the rest of the article (I suspect BajanYankee would disagree strongly) but I like their rather memorable comment on the rule:

If you don’t recall, last year the City Council passed a zoning amendment to require new residential developments on the transit-rich, pedestrian-unfriendly avenue in South Brooklyn to include a certain amount of ground-level retail, to appease the ghost of Jane Jacobs and to stop burning the souls of all who walk the avenue.

Look beyond Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn for solutions to a lack of retail | Market Urbanism
Indeed one needs to look beyond a specific street and see if that street would be a good retail location for nearby streets. If I'm thinking of the right place, that part of 4th Avenue has a bunch of purely residential side streets, whose residents might be happy with more stores on the main streets.

But I agree that nowadays cities sometimes want to zone every piece of commercial property for mixed use, and there isn't necessarily the need or demand for it. Then you wind up with vacant storefronts or ground floor offices that don't do much for the street. Better to concentrate the retail around rail stations, bus transfer points, other uses and nodes that help support it.
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:07 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Indeed one needs to look beyond a specific street and see if that street would be a good retail location for nearby streets. If I'm thinking of the right place, that part of 4th Avenue has a bunch of purely residential side streets, whose residents might be happy with more stores on the main streets.
4th avenue has a subway line but the area to the west within walking distance is lightly populated and mostly zoned industrial.

4th avenue is a wide thoroughfare with fast moving traffic, and its stoplights are timed to create a long stretch of green. It's also harder to cross and more difficult to cross midblock than a typical NYC avenue.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...32.95,,0,-7.28

the parallel 5th avenue has more retail and is designed more for pedestrian. Everything has retail, and most have apartments above stores, though this particular view some lack them.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brook...33.15,,0,-9.91

there are lots of similar situation all over the city. Here's another (more retailed streets for pedestrians, relatively empty street for cars):


Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here's the commercial street of the neighborhood:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Green...313.68,,0,2.24

arterial is a block away:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Green...,8.95,,0,-2.11

few stores.
In this neighborhood, both avenues have supermarkets with the one the pedestrian avenue having no parking and the one on the "auto avenue" having parking. Here, though the subway is on the pedestrian avenue. In the other case, the pedestrian avenue used to have an elevated; the subway on the wider avenue was built later.

Last edited by nei; 01-23-2013 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,370 posts, read 59,807,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
To describe a block of row houses as "cookie cutter" would mean to describe just about every apartment building, condo or other types of buildings as being cookie cutter.
Sure, they're cookie-cutter if they all look the same. And they do. The buildings in the pictures: Just off the top of my head I can place similar buildings in newer urban developments in Philadelphia, Dayton, Norristown, Cincinnati, Ann Arbor ... The list does go on. They all look alike. Not identical. Alike.

You think the builders didn't use the same or similar molds for those developments?

Quote:
I think cookie cutter is a more apt description when you have block after block of the same manufactured housing, all looking more or less identical or not distinguishable in any real way.
Why would "cookie-cutter" apply only to housing? And, no doubt, you mean suburban housing, riiiiight?
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Old 01-23-2013, 11:38 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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The cookie-cutter argument is starting to hijack the thread at this point and perhaps belongs on another (or new) thread.
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