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Old 01-23-2013, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,014,596 times
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When I was in Oregon last October I visited this fascinating and inspiring exhibition by the" Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian National Design Museum"in Washington at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland.

A lot of the projects are about sustainable design to improve people's lives in third world and developing countries and I found the ingenuity quite staggering.

The exhibition is now finished but it might be of interest for some posters to read about it on their website. It takes in recycling, bottom up communities building,sustainable development,urban and rural planning etc... and localism at its best IMO.

Home | Cooper Hewitt

Not sure if this has been covered in this forum before. Apologies if it has.

Has anyone seen the exhibition ?
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