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Old 01-24-2013, 10:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Really? I've never seen anyone water their lawns anywhere I've lived. Not even during drought years.

I guess we're all smarter -- or exhibit more pronounced cheapskate tendencies -- than the "vast majority of households."

Assumptions are dangerous things, Grasshopper.
So getting off topic - but just read the OP to mean areas of the country that one has to water the lawn more often than not to keep it year round.

OK? Move on?
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
what do you mean?
Well, I don't think it is necessary to water lawns in most of Iowa or Missouri. I think the mid point of the US is in Kansas somewhere. I had friends that lived in KC that didn't water their lawns either. Maybe i don't understand why he excluded only the eastern 1/3...people obviously do water in these areas, but it isn't necessary.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by almost3am View Post
Well, I don't think it is necessary to water lawns in most of Iowa or Missouri. I think the mid point of the US is in Kansas somewhere. I had friends that lived in KC that didn't water their lawns either. Maybe i don't understand why he excluded only the eastern 1/3...people obviously do water in these areas, but it isn't necessary.
These were broad boundaries - but I think the point is reasonably clear.

In the arid west, for the most part, laws aren't an option and people have figured out a way around this.

In the humid east - watering lawns isn't an issue because the climate is more hospitable to lawns and water is not a scarce resource.

It is the middle of the country (roughly) that faces both a drier climate necessitating occasional lawn watering, and potentially faces issues with allocation of resources. If this does not apply to your area - then move along, or, contrary, if you want to explore the hypothetical, then please. But I don't think we need to debate whether it's the 99th or the 90th line of longitude to which separates the drier and wetter climes. . .obviously its a gradation and differs from region to region.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
These were broad boundaries - but I think the point is reasonably clear.

In the arid west, for the most part, laws aren't an option and people have figured out a way around this.

In the humid east - watering lawns isn't an issue because the climate is more hospitable to lawns and water is not a scarce resource.

It is the middle of the country (roughly) that faces both a drier climate necessitating occasional lawn watering, and potentially faces issues with allocation of resources. If this does not apply to your area - then move along.
Ok, I think it does apply to me in Illinois (correct me if I am wrong) and I answered earlier. In the peak of summer my yard typically goes brown for up to a month and then starts getting green again...before it gets white (snow). I guess I water the shrubs/flowers occassionally during the peak of summer, but not the lawn. Lawns really don't need watering in the midwest, but a lot of people like them lush and green from Spring thorugh Fall, so they do water.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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I'm not really part of your target group, because I have a small urban lot, and don't need to water. But, I do like having a yard for planting things. I don't care about lawn/grass, though.

I've seen examples of terrace gardening, and that doesn't have the same appeal for me. So, that's one reason I wouldn't be interested in condo/apartment living.

If I lived somewhere where watering was necessary for growing a standard lawn, I'd look into xeriscaping.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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We have drought-tolerant grass. Sometimes we go the whole summer without being able to use a sprinkler because of drought restrictions. The grass is grateful for the sprinkle it gets once a week from a hose and so far it's hung in there.

I would much rather have a paved area than a green yard. I could always put flowerpots and planters around the paved area if I wanted some plant life and had the extra water. I'm planning to have concrete poured in most of my back yard eventually, leave a little strip of yard for my dogs, but turn the rest into a space we can actually enjoy.
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Old 01-24-2013, 10:57 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I suspect a lawn wouldn't go brown in a typical Massachusetts summer, it might just look less lush.

Last edited by nei; 01-24-2013 at 12:44 PM..
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Old 01-24-2013, 12:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
We have drought-tolerant grass. Sometimes we go the whole summer without being able to use a sprinkler because of drought restrictions. The grass is grateful for the sprinkle it gets once a week from a hose and so far it's hung in there.

I would much rather have a paved area than a green yard. I could always put flowerpots and planters around the paved area if I wanted some plant life and had the extra water. I'm planning to have concrete poured in most of my back yard eventually, leave a little strip of yard for my dogs, but turn the rest into a space we can actually enjoy.
A bit OT, but wouldn't that much concrete make for a very hot backyard in the summer between reflection and heat soak? Not to mention the effect on the temperatures in the back of your home and the glare the concrete would cause.
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Old 01-24-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
You need to get out more.
Bwah hahahahahaha! You just made my flu feel all better.

Quote:
Some of my parent's neighbors had automatic sprinklers that went off while it was raining.
You know I don't live in an automatic-sprinkler kind of neighborhood! LOL

Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
If I lived somewhere where watering was necessary for growing a standard lawn, I'd look into xeriscaping.
As much as I love the feel of cool grass (or in the case of my current yard, cool ground ivy and crabgrass ... ) under my feet on a hot summer evening, if I lived out West I'd have a 4x4 patch of grass for my tootsies, and the rest in native plants.

But I don't, and even if it doesn't rain for a month I don't bother watering the lawn, but instead enjoy the vacation from mowing.

I do water my veggies, though, using dishwater (good for keeping bugs away) and rainwater; very rarely do I water with the hose.
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Old 01-24-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: NC
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In the spirit of the OP's question, I would still want the same sized lot even without a lawn. Part of the benefit of living in a single family home is that you do not need to be up close to your neighbors. Having space to establish some privacy, some quiet, and a sense of ownership are the important factors for me. Leaving the yard natural might be hard to take, especially after being disturbed during the process of building the house, but there are always other ways to make the grounds look nice with native plants and stone or sand.
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