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Old 01-29-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,101,267 times
Reputation: 3117

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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think it really depends on the breed of hipster you are dealing with.
Yeah I'm just rolling with the trolling/self-deprication (?) theme here.

I'm a short walk from the grocery, a farmers market, a halal store, and a phillipine/thai store. So I can get super annoying about what types of tahini I like.
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:48 PM
 
2,145 posts, read 1,588,607 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think it really depends on the breed of hipster you are dealing with.
I think some wont even shop there unless the cashier has face tattoos (or face piercings at the very least).
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,110,077 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFi View Post
I think some wont even shop there unless the cashier has face tattoos (or face piercings at the very least).
I can't tell if this kind of bodega would fall under the hipster-whitey organic food mart or the local Russian-mob-owned bodega that employs MS-13 members.
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,062 posts, read 16,078,369 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It's hard to live near a full service grocery store anywhere. Doesn't matter if you're in Boston, New York or Paris. This is about the best you can do in Paris and the selection here is very limited (and expensive). If you're able to walk to an actual grocery store in almost any city, you're either extremely lucky or you fork over an astronomical sum of money every month for the ability to do so. It's the exception in nearly every urban area in this country.
I guess depends on your definition of astronomical. The studio I rented in Seattle was about half a mile from a QFC. Bit of a walk, and not the cheapest supermarket. It was within much easier walking distance of three neighborhood markets which were quite expensive. Now a lot of the newer buildings do fall into the astronomically expensive range and as they continue to be condemned, torn down, and replaced with condos and luxury apartments it may become true. Welcome to gentrification. It's what brought the QFC into the area. On the other hand, now there's a couple of grocery stores within walking distance of the International District which is gentrifying. Lower Queen Anne is also fairly affordable an with walking distance of Safeway, Trader Joe's, or the more upscale Metropolitan Market. Scattered around Queen Anne there are also a number of more affordable apartments. Likewise with the top of Capitol Hill. Both areas aren't super walkable unlike LQA or the Pike/Pine area of capitol hill, but they're easy to get around in by walking and public transportation.

Over in West Seattle the Junction-North Admiral stretch isn't that expensive. It's not really setup as walkable as much as it is for transit. You have a Safeway and QFC at California and Alaska and then Safeway, PCC, and Metropolitan Market at California and Admiral. The clustering makes it pretty inconvenient for walking, but it's easy to get around via transit. Now if you get down toward White Center it's difficult. The grocery stores are located off of the transit routes, most likely by design to minimize foot traffic. The area is improving, but it is the type of place a major grocery store is going to do its best to avoid being convenient to walk to or reach by public transit as by doing so they avoid a lot of the wouldbe shoplifters.
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,563,220 times
Reputation: 10299
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I don't know, I think the place where "they don't even speak english!" and "It's so authentic!" gets fawned over more ... you know, until they get "discovered."
Or too successful.

[and everybody goes there]
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I don't think it's so much that. Where are you going to walk to living in Marietta, Georgia? Most people live in places like that, not cutesy streetcar suburbs with farmer's markets and transit options nearby. Driving is a necessity for most people.

But even in every other place that's not Manhattan, people drive because it's crazy efficient. Just running a few routine errands in Washington, DC could take the better part of your day while the same tasks could be accomplished by car within an hour. And we're talking about what is probably the second best transit city in America! I can't even imagine what it would be like to try to use the more limited transit in other cities.

Not everyone wants to burn up a whole Saturday afternoon riding buses and trains.
I would never try to push my car free life style on anyone. It has worked for me for my soon to be 67 years and I have been happy with it. But for the record, I have never lived in a cutesy streetcar suburb nor would I ever.
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Old 01-29-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I guess depends on your definition of astronomical. The studio I rented in Seattle was about half a mile from a QFC. Bit of a walk, and not the cheapest supermarket. It was within much easier walking distance of three neighborhood markets which were quite expensive. Now a lot of the newer buildings do fall into the astronomically expensive range and as they continue to be condemned, torn down, and replaced with condos and luxury apartments it may become true. Welcome to gentrification. It's what brought the QFC into the area. On the other hand, now there's a couple of grocery stores within walking distance of the International District which is gentrifying. Lower Queen Anne is also fairly affordable an with walking distance of Safeway, Trader Joe's, or the more upscale Metropolitan Market. Scattered around Queen Anne there are also a number of more affordable apartments. Likewise with the top of Capitol Hill. Both areas aren't super walkable unlike LQA or the Pike/Pine area of capitol hill, but they're easy to get around in by walking and public transportation.

Over in West Seattle the Junction-North Admiral stretch isn't that expensive. It's not really setup as walkable as much as it is for transit. You have a Safeway and QFC at California and Alaska and then Safeway, PCC, and Metropolitan Market at California and Admiral. The clustering makes it pretty inconvenient for walking, but it's easy to get around via transit. Now if you get down toward White Center it's difficult. The grocery stores are located off of the transit routes, most likely by design to minimize foot traffic. The area is improving, but it is the type of place a major grocery store is going to do its best to avoid being convenient to walk to or reach by public transit as by doing so they avoid a lot of the wouldbe shoplifters.
Funny that this thread is kind of blending into the other thread on grocery stores. But access to grocery stores is relevant to the issue of car independence, right?

I can only speak from experience, but the few examples of easy access to large, urban grocery stores I can think of all come along with substantial price tags.

If you lived here, you could easily walk to the Safeway. Unless you're willing to live in someone's basement hovel, you're spending at least 2K to live here.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

There's this Whole Foods. But I'm pretty sure the apartments across the street aren't rent controlled.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

Beaucoup bucks to live here.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

It costs a lot to live near here.

Brooklyn, NY - Google Maps

Here's another example.

Fairway Market, Brooklyn, NY - Google Maps

There just aren't many large grocery stores to walk to in the cities I've lived in. So you pay a premium to live within walking distance of one.
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Old 01-29-2013, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
Reputation: 11726
When I really think about it, city living, imo, is only convenient as far as social life is concerned. It's great being near entertainment options. But that's about it. Having a car is great because that means you can carry more stuff and get places faster.
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Old 01-29-2013, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,534 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
When I really think about it, city living, imo, is only convenient as far as social life is concerned. It's great being near entertainment options. But that's about it. Having a car is great because that means you can carry more stuff and get places faster.
That is your opinion, I think the opposite of you and that is my opinion as well.
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Old 01-29-2013, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,110,077 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Funny that this thread is kind of blending into the other thread on grocery stores. But access to grocery stores is relevant to the issue of car independence, right?

I can only speak from experience, but the few examples of easy access to large, urban grocery stores I can think of all come along with substantial price tags.

If you lived here, you could easily walk to the Safeway. Unless you're willing to live in someone's basement hovel, you're spending at least 2K to live here.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

There's this Whole Foods. But I'm pretty sure the apartments across the street aren't rent controlled.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

Beaucoup bucks to live here.

Washington, DC - Google Maps

It costs a lot to live near here.

Brooklyn, NY - Google Maps

Here's another example.

Fairway Market, Brooklyn, NY - Google Maps

There just aren't many large grocery stores to walk to in the cities I've lived in. So you pay a premium to live within walking distance of one.
I'd say grocery store access is near the top for me when considering if a place is conveniently walkable.

The Ralph's TOD in Hollywood is affordable housing. It's not the most urban structure in the world but certainly provides a grocery store in a walkable environment with affordable housing nearby.

LA is a little different since a single floor supermarket with a parking lot is more common than older cities. But even in San Francisco the Safeways mostly seemed to have at least a small surface parking lot.
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