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Old 01-27-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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All no except for Trappe. It seems pretty new and everything looks the same. I think the term came about to describe Levittown-type suburbs. As time wears on and houses are altered, painted, etc. the cookie cutter appearance diminishes, IMO. That is of course unless there's an HOA or some other decree that ensures the place will look exactly like its neighbors.
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Old 01-27-2013, 09:24 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
All no except for Trappe. It seems pretty new and everything looks the same. I think the term came about to describe Levittown-type suburbs. As time wears on and houses are altered, painted, etc. the cookie cutter appearance diminishes, IMO. That is of course unless there's an HOA or some other decree that ensures the place will look exactly like its neighbors.
Even StuyTown is no?
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
All no except for Trappe. It seems pretty new and everything looks the same. I think the term came about to describe Levittown-type suburbs. As time wears on and houses are altered, painted, etc. the cookie cutter appearance diminishes, IMO. That is of course unless there's an HOA or some other decree that ensures the place will look exactly like its neighbors.
Good point about the HOAs blocking, or trying to block, changes in properties. HOAs have often been overzealous about this stuff.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:18 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Even StuyTown is no?
I missed that one the first time. It's yes.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:23 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
That is of course unless there's an HOA or some other decree that ensures the place will look exactly like its neighbors.
There must be an HOA that decrees every place must be different I lived in a college where the money was donated by a wealthy heiress who stipulated that no two rooms could be alike. It make things more interesting but the sizes weren't always that practical.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:25 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
There must be an HOA that decrees every place must be different I lived in a college where the money was donated by a wealthy heiress who stipulated that no two rooms could be alike. It make things more interesting but the sizes weren't always that practical.
Enforced individualism? An interesting idea.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:52 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Like everything, it depends on your definition of "cookie cutter". (Don't everyone groan at once, please, with me and my definitions!)

Does "cookie cutter" mean exactly alike? Or does it mean, having the same "bones", but being different colors, different landscaping, slightly different features such as one car-1 1/2 car-two car garages, different roof lines, etc? Our first house was in a subdivision that had four models, all with endless options. I do not think there were any two houses that were exactly alike there. However, they all did sort of look alike, even though they were of different heights, e.g. bilevels, trilevels and ranches. In most cities you can tell how old the houses are by what style of house is there. They are "alike but different".
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Like everything, it depends on your definition of "cookie cutter". (Don't everyone groan at once, please, with me and my definitions!)
No groaning, I agree that and people aren't to going agree on which of the definition below.

Quote:
Does "cookie cutter" mean exactly alike? Or does it mean, having the same "bones", but being different colors, different landscaping, slightly different features such as one car-1 1/2 car-two car garages, different roof lines, etc? Our first house was in a subdivision that had four models, all with endless options. I do not think there were any two houses that were exactly alike there. However, they all did sort of look alike, even though they were of different heights, e.g. bilevels, trilevels and ranches. In most cities you can tell how old the houses are by what style of house is there. They are "alike but different".
I would take cookie cutter to mean exactly alike or very close to it. Some houses, both old and new, would fit that.

Old working-class rowhouse neighborhoods of London are more cookie-cutter than that Philly view in the OP. Or this street, which has a section of nearly identical houses, but often with slight detail difference or colors and then something different then another section:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Park+...311.11,,0,2.46

so not as cookie-cutter.

Old city commercial streets can also be more or less cookie cutter; London seems to be more so than American cities. Look at this one in NYC:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Court...7,,0,0.75&z=15

and one in London:

File:Muswell hill broadway.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

the London may actually be slightly newer, unsure.
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
They are "alike but different".
I think our definitions of cookie-cutter might be similar. Just having the same structure painted a different color is enough for me to avoid the label.

I think older project housing is usually the worst offender of cookie cutter:

baltimore and central baltimore - Google Maps Projects in E. Balto. Note the inward-facing design (side note: why? To hide its occupants? For the purpose of creating common areas of interaction? I find it interesting).

brooklyn homes - Google Maps
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Old 01-27-2013, 11:07 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I did not intend to give a definition, I just wanted to get people thinking about what they mean by "cookie cutter".

Here is my old neighborhood:

http://maps.google.com/maps?oe=utf-8...d=0CIkBEPwSMAc

Play around and you can see some of the houses, mainly to the north of the school.
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