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Old 01-26-2013, 09:18 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,834,426 times
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Philadelphia Rowhouses:
1110 Green Street, Philadelphia, PA - Google Maps

Trappe, PA (suburban) townhouses:
Bing Maps - Driving Directions, Traffic and Road Conditions

Stuy Town, New York City:
stuy town - Google Maps

Chinatown, NYC:
Greenwich Street, New York, NY - Google Maps

Montclair, NJ
Bing Maps - Driving Directions, Traffic and Road Conditions

Maplewood, NJ:
Bing Maps - Driving Directions, Traffic and Road Conditions

Hipster Brooklyn:
Bing Maps - Driving Directions, Traffic and Road Conditions

Los Angeles:
Bing Maps - Driving Directions, Traffic and Road Conditions
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:53 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,715,982 times
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1. Ain't
2. Is
3. Ain't
4. Ain't
5. ?
6. ?
7. Ain't
8. ?
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Old 01-26-2013, 09:58 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,834,426 times
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The only one of those answers I understand is #2

How about this:
Cookware | Bakeware | Cutting Sheets, For Cookies & Tarts, 1-3/4" Serrated Circle | B682044 - GlobalIndustrial.com
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,068 posts, read 16,085,690 times
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Phily row-houses. Super cookie cutter to say nothing of atrociously ugly, especially the four centered on. Down the street it's less cookie-cutter.
Trappe, PA. Looks very cookie cutter.
Stuy Town. Projects.
China-Town. I wouldn't call cookie-cutter. Buildings are sufficiently diverse to avoid that.
Montclair, Maplewood. Hard to tell, but does not look cookie-cutter.
Hipster Brooklyn. Cookie-cutter.
LA. Again, can't see much from satelite view, but your stereotypical LA suburban tract is every bit as cookie-cutter as Hipster Brooklyn.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:10 AM
 
1,015 posts, read 1,542,360 times
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Stuyvesant Town is middle class housing.

What's your point here, Nybbler? That some urban housing comes in repeating groups as well as some suburban housing? Are you responding to the criticism of suburban subdivisions as "cookie cutter?"

There's nothing wrong with a repeated group of housing. Depending on the style, most people find the repetition visually pleasing. The issue is the scale of the uniformity. Turn the corner from a group of Philadelphia rowhouses and you'll most likely find something different, even if only a different style of rowhouse. You're likely to find some stores within a few blocks. Places that have different building types in close proximity break up the cookie cutter effect. On the ground, you don't seem the same thing for blocks and blocks and blocks, as you might in a large subdivision.

Time also tends to reduce excessive uniformity, as properties get modified in individual ways. So older places generally look less cookie cutter than newer places. The average scale of development has also risen over time, so older places were generally developed in smaller segments.
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:31 AM
 
195 posts, read 235,506 times
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Stuy town looks the worst. Not only are they cookie cutter but they are ugly as well. Don't know why they have to look like soulless projects. Maybe they were at one time. At least suburban homes have visually appeasing features, and row houses have different colors, designs etc.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:24 AM
 
Location: Michigan
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Faster growing cities will typically have more repetitive housing since that's the quickest and more profitable way to satisfy residential demand. In more slow growing cities and metros, there's likely more variety and different styles.
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:07 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
1. Yes, pretty much
2. Ditto
3. Ditto
4. Ditto, although I got a shot of Greenwich St. with apts.
5. Not really
6. Not really
7. Yep
8. ? Agree that you can't tell much from that view.
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:36 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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1. Not really. The row houses have a variety of architectural detail, styles and color though the basic structure is similar. While the ones centered aren't the best looking of the block, I wouldn't call them ugly. In fact I really like the houses further along the street (more so in the other direction).

2. Yes

3. Yes

4. Kinda, thoughnot every building is the same

5. No

6. No

7. Not really, style changes within the block and to the next block

8. Hard to tell
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:46 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apm193 View Post
Stuy town looks the worst. Not only are they cookie cutter but they are ugly as well. Don't know why they have to look like soulless projects. Maybe they were at one time. At least suburban homes have visually appeasing features, and row houses have different colors, designs etc.
Cheap housing for returning veteran's families. And generic brick seemed to be in style back then, though earlier usually apartment had some adornment. In the interior with greenery it doesn't look as bad:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=stuy+...,,0,-1.17&z=16

Someone disagrees about your judgement of them being ugly:

Why do some people think that Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village are examples of ugly architecture?
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