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Old 03-11-2019, 12:13 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,429,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
There are only so many gyms, banks, bars, dry cleaners, restaurants and grocery stores so wonder what longer term retail will look like as having street retail is always preferred (and some stores are reducing their spread)


On shopping (grocery) I have 4 full service grocery stores within a 5-10 minute walk and even more if I extend further That said I also have an open air market and many smaller specialty stores. Its pretty easy to get by without having to go to a large store but I am probably luckier than most with the breadth and variety of no full service stores close by. That said I do find myself at Acme and WF which are right next to each other 5 minutes away, though I don't think either are even close to 80K sq feet maybe they are closer to 40 but think both would fall under that
I don't think an urban neighborhood can have too many bars and restaurants. If there is demand for it, they will come. Penn Quarter, Union Market, NOMA, Mt. Vernon Triangle, Golden Triangle, Dupont Circle, Logan Circle, H Street, Capital Riverfront, Buzzard Point, Foggy Bottom, The Wharf, Waterfront Station, Shaw, Columbia Heights, Adams Morgan, Georgetown, and Brookland all have tons of restaurants now. That was not the case 15 years ago.

Can there really be too many? They are regional activity centers. More and more are coming every week as development continues to spread across the city. There is another 600,000 sq. feet of retail coming to Rhode Island Avenue soon. Then, you have areas in Ward 7 and Ward 8 that are now getting retail too. People in urban cities will always eat out and drink. Upscale movie theaters and entertainment centers is another great option. Lucky Strikes, Punch Bowl Social, and Pinstripes along with IPIC and Alamo Draft House movie theaters etc.
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Old 03-11-2019, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,948 posts, read 2,404,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
On shopping (grocery) I have 4 full service grocery stores within a 5-10 minute walk and even more if I extend further That said I also have an open air market and many smaller specialty stores. Its pretty easy to get by without having to go to a large store but I am probably luckier than most with the breadth and variety of no full service stores close by. That said I do find myself at Acme and WF which are right next to each other 5 minutes away, though I don't think either are even close to 80K sq feet maybe they are closer to 40 but think both would fall under that
Try half that smaller figure.

I lived nearby (just below 12th and Pine) when the Acme opened (as a Super Fresh) in 1987 and when the Whole Foods opened (before Fresh Fields took its new parent's name) ca. 1997.

The Super Fresh is about 20k sf, and the WFM about 18k sf.

As supermarkets go, they're small, but they're big enough to carry most everything a larger sister store might.
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Old 03-11-2019, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,948 posts, read 2,404,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
There are only so many gyms, banks, bars, dry cleaners, restaurants and grocery stores so wonder what longer term retail will look like as having street retail is always preferred (and some stores are reducing their spread)
Also: Boutique retail and small local merchants seem to be holding their own against the online onslaught. Those are exactly the kind of stores you find in a dense urban district or on a suburban downtown Main Street. You don't find these at the malls, and if there is a category of retail that's truly ailing, it's mall retail.
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Old 03-12-2019, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,304,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Single supermarket or a variety of small grocers don't really matter as long as it fulfills the goal of being able to have the basic goods within walking distance.

I remember there was some report by some urban institute that Jackson Heights in Queens was a "food desert" because of its relative lack of supermarkets. It was completely ludicrous, because Jackson Heights has a massive variety of small grocers and shops carrying a massive range of goods including fresh fruits and vegetables running a gamut possibly not equalled in any neighborhood in the city and possibly the world.
LOL. That is crazy talk! “Jackson Heights” and “Food Desert” should never be in the same sentence together.
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Old 03-12-2019, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,948 posts, read 2,404,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
LOL. That is crazy talk! “Jackson Heights” and “Food Desert” should never be in the same sentence together.
Maybe this belongs over on the "which city is more like New York" discussion, but one thing I note about New York City bodegas and corner stores is that many of them, if not most, sell produce of some sort, something all but a handful of Philadelphia corner stores lack.
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Old 03-12-2019, 07:04 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,117 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Maybe this belongs over on the "which city is more like New York" discussion, but one thing I note about New York City bodegas and corner stores is that many of them, if not most, sell produce of some sort, something all but a handful of Philadelphia corner stores lack.
Maybe you should start stocking your local bodega with produce.
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:20 PM
 
1,827 posts, read 530,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
LOL. That is crazy talk! “Jackson Heights” and “Food Desert” should never be in the same sentence together.
Yeah that was ridiculous. The author is either clueless or a pretentious health food nut
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