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Old 01-27-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Please only use major grocery stores versus small neighborhood markets. Thoughts?
Than that excludes the majority of grocery stores in Manhattan, which are often small. Like D'Agostinos and Food Emporium. They are mostly in Manhattan and mostly under 10,000 square feet. One could even argue that smaller neighborhood markets are actually more urban than larger ones where people drive and park.

Anyway, historically this isn't very common in LA. I can't think of any older stores like this, although there are a few new ones and a few more under construction. With mixed use now so prevalent, I doubt that there will be any new standalone grocery stores built in the "core" of LA. How fast the existing ones are replaced will depend on housing needs, which right now seem very under built compared to demand.
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I don't really know much about how much this concept has caught on in cities around the nation. That's why I would be interested in hearing what cities people know of where this is already or is beginning to be prevalent. It's a great anchor for urban developments.


I would say the top five cities are:

1. New York
2. Chicago
3. Washington D.C. (will pass Chicago next year)
4. Boston
5. Philadelphia
How are you even quantifying your assertion, and how do you know how things will change in one year...?
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Probably this.
One city that might be overlooked here is New Orleans. Lots of ground floor grocery stores in the Vieux Carre and Downtown.
I wouldn't say that. The CBD just got a Rouses, and I'm not sure there are apartments on the other floors. The Quarter has plenty of apartments on top of all sorts of retail.
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:08 PM
 
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It used to be said that there couldn't be apartments over grocery stores, there would be too many problems with insects and the like. We're past that one.

Safeway proposed a store with apartments above in the affluent Rockridge section of Oakland. The neighbors fought it down almost instantly. Safeway has another property that it's renovating in North Oakland where it has refused to propose mixed use, even though some neighborhood groups actually suggested it. It frustrates me because there's a Safeway (and a Whole Foods, for that matter) in apartment buildings in the South of Market district of San Francisco. There's also a Trader Joe's on the ground floor of an apartment building in Berkeley, the first major grocery store in an apartment building in Berkeley.
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Old 01-27-2013, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,133,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Than that excludes the majority of grocery stores in Manhattan, which are often small. Like D'Agostinos and Food Emporium. They are mostly in Manhattan and mostly under 10,000 square feet. One could even argue that smaller neighborhood markets are actually more urban than larger ones where people drive and park.

Anyway, historically this isn't very common in LA. I can't think of any older stores like this, although there are a few new ones and a few more under construction. With mixed use now so prevalent, I doubt that there will be any new standalone grocery stores built in the "core" of LA. How fast the existing ones are replaced will depend on housing needs, which right now seem very under built compared to demand.
Yeah can't think of any old mixed-use with grocery stores at the ground floor, but there are a few in LA that are newer developments. Ralph's in East Hollywood and DTLA, TJ's in Central Hollywood and Beverly Center, future Wal-Mart grocer in Chinatown.

As far as Boston, I'm having a hard time thinking of grocery stores with apartments above. Any examples? EDIT: Trader Joe's in Back Bay: http://goo.gl/maps/QjCCl -That place blew my mind with how tiny / narrow it was, certainly unlike anything I'd ever seen in CA.
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:44 PM
 
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not sure where you headed to with your question, but I lived in a flat like this. I had diary store and vegetables store right below.
you know what?

RATS.
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:52 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post

As far as Boston, I'm having a hard time thinking of grocery stores with apartments above. Any examples? EDIT: Trader Joe's in Back Bay: trader joes boston, ma - Google Maps -That place blew my mind with how tiny / narrow it was, certainly unlike anything I'd ever seen in CA.
or here:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=trade...2.43,,0,-10.04
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
Than that excludes the majority of grocery stores in Manhattan, which are often small. Like D'Agostinos and Food Emporium. They are mostly in Manhattan and mostly under 10,000 square feet. One could even argue that smaller neighborhood markets are actually more urban than larger ones where people drive and park.
I agree, big box supermarkets are mostly a suburban idea that's making its way into cities mostly through new large scale developments. The scale of buildings in the 19th century was too small for big stores like that, so you just had tons of small stores which put together could still offer a substantial variety of products.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think those are offices (I worked across the street from this TJs and had a lot of friends that work / worked there), but yeah same idea.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
I agree, big box supermarkets are mostly a suburban idea that's making its way into cities mostly through new large scale developments. The scale of buildings in the 19th century was too small for big stores like that, so you just had tons of small stores which put together could still offer a substantial variety of products.
You can find big box supermarkets in old buildings of NYC:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Whole...02.17,,0,-18.7

former department store building (well now half used for a department store)

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Trade...0.02,,0,-15.43

another one.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Trade...2,225,,0,-7.48

former bank building. Trader Joe's is usually on the small side. Otherwise, NYC supermarkets tend to be what I showed earlier in the thread. Otherwise the city still favors small-scale grocery stores, even stores labelled just "fruit stores".
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