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Old 01-27-2013, 03:24 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,603,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm curious how common grocery stores without their own parking is in cities.
When I lived in Mpls and few years ago, there was a Trader Joe's in St Louis Park, and dense suburb of Mpls. There were apartments built above the Trader Joe's, but the parking lot for the store was tiny and a HUGE hassle to park in. I always parked on the street, even if it meant walking several blocks, just to avoid getting clobbered in the store parking lot. I favor density and urbanism, but a tiny lot for a grocery store is a headache for anyone who has to drive to a location (who doesn't live in the immediate neighborhood).
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,918 posts, read 3,632,650 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
...there was a Trader Joe's...but the parking lot for the store was tiny and a HUGE hassle to park in.
That is a characteristic of nearly all of the Trader Joe's in LA. There's a thread about it in the Los Angeles forum right now. The parking lots are small and spaces are tight. It's part of the shared experience of shopping there to some extent.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:09 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,429,620 times
Reputation: 2358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
How are you even quantifying your assertion, and how do you know how things will change in one year...?

I was saying that because of what is under construction in D.C. right now. There are currently 7 highrise apartment buildings with grocery stores under construction in D.C. proper. The grocery stores range from 42,000-83,000 sq. feet in size. This is in addition to the ones already here and other's breaking ground this year.


42,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 215 units above:
360

62,000 sq. foot Safeway Grocery Store with 220 units above
Petworth Safeway & Residences

56,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 145 units above
Cathedral Commons

71,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 400 units above
CityMarket at O (rental)

70,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 350 apartments above
Fort Totten Square

Trader Joe's Grocery Store (unknown sq.) with 267 units above
Louis at 14th

83,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 303 units above
77H
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
That is a characteristic of nearly all of the Trader Joe's in LA. There's a thread about it in the Los Angeles forum right now. The parking lots are small and spaces are tight. It's part of the shared experience of shopping there to some extent.
That's interesting. People are going ape-s*** over the idea of them locating here.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:24 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,429,620 times
Reputation: 2358
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
I think DC does a good job of carrying this concept throughout the entire region. However, I agree with Boston (for sure) being slightly behind NY and Chicago. I would like to believe that it's all relative after the top two but I really think it becomes a matter of preference and interpretation vs data.

I didn't think Boston had many normal large format grocery stores in the city that have apartments above them. Could you list a few that you know of? I know D.C. will have over 10 next year. I don't count the corner store 10,000 sq. foot format because they are prevalent in most cities. I'm talking about the 40,000+ foot normal grocery stores with all options. Here are a few examples of the stores in D.C. that are actually built. There are 7 under construction right now to add to these.

Safeway Grocery Store in SW Waterfront
1100 4TH ST SW - Google Maps


Safeway Grocery Store in Mt. Vernon Triangle
city vista dc - Google Maps

Harris Teater in NOMA
NOMA dc - Google Maps
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Maryland
4,268 posts, read 5,473,848 times
Reputation: 4591
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I was saying that because of what is under construction in D.C. right now. There are currently 7 highrise apartment buildings with grocery stores under construction in D.C. proper. The grocery stores range from 42,000-83,000 sq. feet in size. This is in addition to the ones already here and other's breaking ground this year.


42,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 215 units above:
360

62,000 sq. foot Safeway Grocery Store with 220 units above
Petworth Safeway & Residences

56,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 145 units above
Cathedral Commons

71,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 400 units above
CityMarket at O (rental)

70,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 350 apartments above
Fort Totten Square

Trader Joe's Grocery Store (unknown sq.) with 267 units above
Louis at 14th

83,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 303 units above
77H
Yeah, but if you don't do a direct comparison between the two cities, including the amount of grocery stores that occupy the first floor of a highrise that are currently existing as well as any under construction, including those of apartment buildings that are already complete but are being converted, how can you say anything about D.C. passing Chicago (even as specific as *next year*). How do we know that D.C. is even in the top 5? That Chicago is ahead of D.C.? Seems like it's just an impression not grounded in any actual direct comparison...
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,103,705 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I didn't think Boston had many normal large format grocery stores in the city that have apartments above them. Could you list a few that you know of? I know D.C. will have over 10 next year. I don't count the corner store 10,000 sq. foot format because they are prevalent in most cities. I'm talking about the 40,000+ foot normal grocery stores with all options. Here are a few examples of the stores in D.C. that are actually built. There are 7 under construction right now to add to these.

Safeway Grocery Store in SW Waterfront
1100 4TH ST SW - Google Maps


Safeway Grocery Store in Mt. Vernon Triangle
city vista dc - Google Maps

Harris Teater in NOMA
NOMA dc - Google Maps
NEI posted one and I posted one. But other than that I cannot think of any in Boston proper. Maybe there are some in Cambridge and Somerville? I also wouldn't be surprised if there was eventually one in that Waterfront District that is being redeveloped, although downtown Boston was pretty lacking in full-service grocery stores when I lived there.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,103,705 times
Reputation: 3979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Yeah, but if you don't do a direct comparison between the two cities, including the amount of grocery stores that occupy the first floor of a highrise that are currently existing as well as any under construction, including those of apartment buildings that are already complete but are being converted, how can you say anything about D.C. passing Chicago (even as specific as *next year*). How do we know that D.C. is even in the top 5? That Chicago is ahead of D.C.? Seems like it's just an impression not grounded in any actual direct comparison...
I agree, this seems like a very difficult thing to compare. I have no idea even in my own city how grocery store / residential combos there are, much less any other city that I have only visited a few times. It's also hard to gauge because there are at least a dozen large mixed use projects under way in Los Angeles but the retail tenants have not been confirmed yet. Seems like NYC would be solidly atop this list, but from there it becomes very hazy.

Would a super-Walgreens count? It has a grocery store component to it: Super Walgreens comes to Hollywood | The Residences At W Hollywood
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
2,918 posts, read 3,632,650 times
Reputation: 2141
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I was saying that because of what is under construction in D.C. right now. There are currently 7 highrise apartment buildings with grocery stores under construction in D.C. proper. The grocery stores range from 42,000-83,000 sq. feet in size. This is in addition to the ones already here and other's breaking ground this year.


42,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 215 units above:
360

62,000 sq. foot Safeway Grocery Store with 220 units above
Petworth Safeway & Residences

56,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 145 units above
Cathedral Commons

71,000 sq. foot Giant Food Grocery Store with 400 units above
CityMarket at O (rental)

70,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 350 apartments above
Fort Totten Square

Trader Joe's Grocery Store (unknown sq.) with 267 units above
Louis at 14th

83,000 sq. foot Walmart Grocery Store with 303 units above
77H
I think that's fantastic! I also think that you started this thread to toot DC's horn.

Not that it's not warranted. DC is a leader in many regards.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:40 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,429,620 times
Reputation: 2358
sorry, double post.
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