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Old 01-27-2013, 04:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
Yeah, but if you don't do a direct comparison between the two cities, including the amount of grocery stores that occupy the first floor of a highrise that are currently existing as well as any under construction, including those of apartment buildings that are already complete but are being converted, how can you say anything about D.C. passing Chicago (even as specific as *next year*). How do we know that D.C. is even in the top 5? That Chicago is ahead of D.C.? Seems like it's just an impression not grounded in any actual direct comparison...

Well I searched in Chicago and most didn't have apartment's above them. There were actually barely any. Most were small corner store mart's which most cities have.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Well I searched in Chicago and most didn't have apartment's above them. There were actually barely any. Most were small corner store mart's which most cities have.
It's a good thing Chicago doesn't have a lot of apartment buildings through which to search in order to have covered the entire city...It just feels like this was a very self-serving thread.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2Easy View Post
I think that's fantastic! I also think that you started this thread to toot DC's horn.

Not that it's not warranted. DC is a leader in many regards.

Not at all and I wouldn't have even posted these had that poster not been so oblivious to the store's in D.C. judging by their intial response to me. I am interested in the future of this format because it allows grocery stores to be built without breaking the streetwall. That maintains maximum urbanity with a streetwall intact.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
It's a good thing Chicago doesn't have a lot of apartment buildings through which to search in order to have covered the entire city...It just feels like this was a very self-serving thread.

Actually, based on your initial hostility, it seems like you were doing the typical I am from Chicago and we are better than every city not named New York. How dare someone rank D.C. anywhere near Chicago in anything.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
NEI posted one and I posted one. But other than that I cannot think of any in Boston proper. Maybe there are some in Cambridge and Somerville? I also wouldn't be surprised if there was eventually one in that Waterfront District that is being redeveloped, although downtown Boston was pretty lacking in full-service grocery stores when I lived there.

I'm sure the new apartment highrise's will add a few especially since it seems like it's something missing in the marketplace. Boston with it's density would be great for this.
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Old 01-27-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Actually, based on your initial hostility, it seems like you were doing the typical I am from Chicago and we are better than every city not named New York. How dare someone rank D.C. anywhere near Chicago in anything.
No, you specifically wrote "Washington D.C. (will pass Chicago next year)"--if you are going to say something so exact, I'd suggest that you have data. I questioned where you got any of your rankings, and you didn't have any data for any city except for D.C., which seems self-serving to me.

I live in one of the types of buildings that you are talking about and, in my opinion, I don't think 40,000 sq. ft grocery stores in the first floor of a 12-floor building function as urbanity litmus tests and more than small stores and food markets do.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
No, you specifically wrote "Washington D.C. (will pass Chicago next year)"--if you are going to say something so exact, I'd suggest that you have data. I questioned where you got any of your rankings, and you didn't have any data for any city except for D.C., which seems self-serving to me.
When did I say I didn't have any data for othr cities. I don't know everything but I definetly studied the typical format for grocery stores in the 5 cities I named. Most either had surface parking lots or didn't have apartments or an office building on top of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maintainschaos View Post
I live in one of the types of buildings that you are talking about and, in my opinion, I don't think 40,000 sq. ft grocery stores in the first floor of a 12-floor building function as urbanity litmus tests and more than small stores and food markets do.
That's fine but you can also say that in a constructive way without attacking people. This is just an academic discussion so there is never any reason to attack people over a stupid topic in a message board. I was talking about large format grocery stores because they offer all option's needed by all different people. A small format grocery store will not allow any and everyone to live in a neighborhood and shop at the grocery store for all their needs. Do you see Whole Foods building 10,000 square foot stores? I don't know what is so hard to understand about that. Funny thing is, you are probably behind the eightball because Chicago will most certainly be building more of these types of stores in the future because it's popular now. The choice to build large format urban stores is the actual store's and developer's choice by the way, maybe the major grocery store's in Chicago and Chicago dvelopers are just warming up to the idea since they most likely have been using the surface parking lot model.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:12 PM
 
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You always create threads that indirectly boost D.C, then use "I'm an urban planner" as validation.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
You always create threads that indirectly boost D.C, then use "I'm an urban planner" as validation.

Question for you?

How is talking about grocery stores with apartments above them boosting D.C.? This is going to be good.
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Old 01-27-2013, 05:19 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I'm not even sure if this is a valid urbanity test. Bay Ridge is rather urban if you mean by density, high-ish pedestrian volume and relatively transit use. But the supermarkets are only one floor:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=super...265.98,,0,0.12

Note the lack of parking. Bay Ridge would be the densest neighborhood in DC if it was magically plopped there. It's about 6 miles from Manhattan. Here's one I found elsewhere in Brooklyn that has stuff above it:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Park+...45.85,,0,-6.34

but many don't have apartments above stores, more examples here:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/27967003-post9.html

I think supermarkets lend themselves not to having any stores about it for pest control, ventilation reasons.
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