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View Poll Results: Most gentrified city
Atlanta 2 2.53%
Baltimore 2 2.53%
Boston 3 3.80%
Chicago 8 10.13%
Cleveland 3 3.80%
Dallas 1 1.27%
Denver 2 2.53%
Houston 0 0%
LA 7 8.86%
Miami 1 1.27%
New Orleans 5 6.33%
New York 13 16.46%
Philadelphia 23 29.11%
Pittsburgh 7 8.86%
San Francisco 6 7.59%
Seattle 4 5.06%
Washington, DC 32 40.51%
Other 5 6.33%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 79. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-30-2013, 12:08 AM
 
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DC. My friend bought a $600,000 row house a few years ago with crack dealers standing on the corners. That NE neighborhood has dropped from 90% black to about 60% black, and is still dropping fast. Most of the new arrivals are white, hispanic or Indian/Pakistani.

SW and SE DC are still heavily black, but there's tons of "black gentrification" that the media misses. The unemployed and low-wage black residents have been moving out to Maryland while middle class and professional class black residents are buying houses near metro stations. The new residents usually keep a low profile, wearing cheaper casual clothes around the neighborhood so they don't look "rich" by wearing suits home from work - it's a way of avoiding burglaries.
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Old 01-30-2013, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Have a lot of long-time residents been displaced, or are they able to enjoy the improvement in the neighborhood too?
Excellent point. What's happened to all the people that have been priced out/forced out of these gentrifying neighborhoods?
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:42 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Have a lot of long-time residents been displaced, or are they able to enjoy the improvement in the neighborhood too?
For Harlem, I'd assume some have been displaced. But skimming streetviews, you can see a lot of new development. And from Bajan's video, plenty of housing was abandoned. The newcomers may have been able to filled with just new or rehabilitated housing. As to rising rents, most of the old population lived in rent-stabilized housing; there's a legal limit to how fast rents can be raised.

And transition is a change in the Hispanic population at the same time, an increase in Mexican and Dominicans and a decrease in the Puerto Rican population.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
I lived on 112th st between 2nd avenue - which the north part of the street houses all of the projects from 1st ave to lennox ave. On the south side of 112th is totally (and I repeat totally) gentrified. They live in 600k+ homes and face the projects. In five more years, those project won't be there. I used to live in "Old Town" in Chicago in 2001. Cabrini Greens projects were nearby - not anymore. Gone and gone!
I'm not disagreeing gentrification hasn't happen. But that' doesn't mean the ghetto, marginalized population is gone. And I doubt the projects would be removed in the near future. Chicago's situation isn't the same as New York City, though I don't know the details of Chicago as well. I don't think anyone's seriously suggested removing New York projects. It would be difficult to replace housing removed.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
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D.C. and its not even close. This city went from chocolate city to being mixed with vanilla and butter pecan overnight.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:59 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahatma X View Post
D.C. and its not even close. This city went from chocolate city to being mixed with vanilla and butter pecan overnight.
As Colbert said:

Mayor Nagin is here from New Orleans, the chocolate city! Yeah, give it up. Mayor Nagin, I'd like to welcome you to Washington, D.C., the chocolate city with a marshmallow center and a graham cracker crust of corruption. It's a Mallomar, I guess, is what I'm describing, is a Mallomar. Itís a seasonal cookie.

Stephen Colbert Transcript - Colbert Bush Roast Transcript
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,255 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
For Harlem, I'd assume some have been displaced. But skimming streetviews, you can see a lot of new development. And from Bajan's video, plenty of housing was abandoned. The newcomers may have been able to filled with just new or rehabilitated housing. As to rising rents, most of the old population lived in rent-stabilized housing; there's a legal limit to how fast rents can be raised.
Yes. There was no shortage of abandoned brownstones in Harlem during the 1990s. There are still a number of abandoned brownstones in Harlem, which nearly all have values well north of $2 million (DMX had several woes with his Harlem brownstone, which eventually sold for $1.9 million back in 2006). When the demographics change (income wise), it's in large part because of brownstone renovations.

And as nei mentioned, there is quite a bit of development going on in Harlem. Harlem now has an Aloft Hotel, several new construction condos and apartments, and Columbia University is planning a massive expansion into Manhattanville.

Gentrification (also known as the "G Train") in Manhattan cannot be stopped.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: plano
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What does gentrification mean? More expensive to live in now that before? Is it a good thing or bad thing to be more expensive or gentrified? If so how so?
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
DC has gentrified much more than Philadelphia. Around 2000, you could buy a rowhouse within 3-5 minutes walking distance of the Potomac Avenue Metro station for $40,000. My guess is that you'd pay a minimum of about $850,000 today to live in the same vicinity..
nah, not quite. you can find houses that high, but most of the renovated ones run for alot closer to 600k, and there's at least one unrenovated one for 450 on G between 16th and 17th.

For 850k minimum for a townhouse you have to go further west, and closer to East Cap.
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:31 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahatma X View Post
D.C. and its not even close. This city went from chocolate city to being mixed with vanilla and butter pecan overnight.

I was in Hampden in baltimore the other day - what used to be solid "redneck" is now heavily hipster. How do you measure the change when the complexions do not change?
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
What does gentrification mean? More expensive to live in now that before? Is it a good thing or bad thing to be more expensive or gentrified? If so how so?
It's when a neighborhood goes from being poor to being middle-class due to an influx of new professional residents. Gentrifying areas often have lots of class tension between old residents and new ones, and it can spill over into schools and zoning battles. It's also used as a shorthand term for a black or hispanic neighborhood suddenly becoming much more white.

Sometimes the term is used when whites moving into a black neighborhood aren't even "affluent", like college students or artists. But I've never see the term "gentrification" applied to a poor white neighborhood that turns middle-class. There certainly are areas like that, but the media misses the story consistently.

I've also never seen the term applied to Asians moving into black neighborhoods, although that happens a lot too. And then there areas that used to be American blacks but have a huge influx of North African or Middle Eastern immigrants. That's happened in several spots in Michigan, Minnesota and DC. There's a large Ethiopean neighborhood in DC with great restaurants and stores.

I don't think it's either "good" or "bad", it just is what it is. Urban areas are often in flux, and so are rural areas that become suburbanized. It's infuriating when some old hog farmer gets sued by the McMansion development that popped up next to his family farm, though.
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