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View Poll Results: Which of these would be the best Texas Triangle regional high-speed transit network?
A 4 21.05%
B 4 21.05%
C 1 5.26%
D 5 26.32%
E 3 15.79%
F 2 10.53%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-29-2013, 09:15 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by hensleya1 View Post
I can guarantee that a proposed Texas HSR network would be constrained by similar issues that Acela faces - that it's limited in speed in built up areas (urban, suburban, and exurban), probably limited to 70-80 MPH or less. Even if you discount the NIMBY factor, there's design limitations due to whatever right of way you can manage to acquire. Add in the stops - time it takes to fully unload and reload hundreds of passengers, and I don't think that even a trans-Texas HSR would be any faster than driving on the Interstate (and due to the immense capital cost up-front, train tickets would likely be more expensive than gassing a car up).
Acela is unusually slow for high speed rail. It uses mostly existing tracks in built areas. Trains have lots of doors, unless ticketing is checked at entry (it's not, for example in the UK) it shouldn't take more than a few minutes to load and unload.

London to Liverpool, relatively slow for European high speed rail has a schedule time of 2hr15mins for 211 miles. British motorway speed limits are 70 mph, google maps has a suggested driving time of 3hr40 mins with traffic 4hr12 mins (with most of the congested in London. Why drive on the motorway for hours when you sit on the train?

Even better is Paris to Marseille 481 miles, 6hr50mins driving (7hr10mins with traffic), 3hr5-3hr20mins train. Fastest train from Madrid to Barcelona is 2hr30mins. 386 miles, driving time 5hr 50mins. Was the world's air route.

Quote:
EDIT: Just to humor us all, I did a quick search of Acela - a theoretical train ticket from Boston to Washington DC would cost $99.00 and take you 7 hours and 50 minutes to get there. (leaving tomorrow morning, Wednesday).

Driving, according to Google Maps, takes 441 miles and can be done in 7 hours and 19 minutes - depending on your car's fuel economy and tolls, it could well turn out to be less than $100.
As hands said, traffic makes a large difference. For a business traveler hours on a train could be used for something else. For myself, I'd rather sit on a train for 5 hours than drive for 5 hours, similar to car speed is sufficient to make a good alternate to driving.
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:32 PM
 
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Here's my favorite one so far - it's a combination of C, D and the Texas T-Bone presented in the Texas version of this thread.

Dallas is connected to Ft Worth through the DFW airport, which makes more sense than Arlington:


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Old 02-07-2013, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
Here's my favorite one so far - it's a combination of C, D and the Texas T-Bone presented in the Texas version of this thread.

Dallas is connected to Ft Worth through the DFW airport, which makes more sense than Arlington:

Three stops in the Metroplex though? I'm surprised that they would service DFW but not IAH in Houston along with Downtown Houston.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:20 PM
 
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Why not just terminate at Dallas Union Station. Tre could act as the Fort Worth Connection.
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:56 PM
 
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I don't pretend to know Texas well, but I think the problem there for high speed rail would be different. In the Northeastern US and in Calfornia where HSR is planned, there are strong transit hubs in the major cities. So people can get to the HSR by walking or transit. Think about Pennsylvania station in New York, 30th St. station in Philadelphia, Union Station in Los Angeles.

But my understanding is that there aren't equivalent transit hubs in Texas cities, that transit use just isn't that strong. I suppose one could try to do it with enormous parking structures, but they'd generate enormous congestion, and possibly neighborhood resistance. It could be hard to pry people out of their cars once they got on. Lots of countries have built transit-connected HSR, but I don't think anybody's done it on a park and ride model.
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Old 03-02-2014, 02:08 PM
 
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E This option would mimic the air traffic patterns plus during gulf storm evacuations this existing system would greatly augment houston's ability to get persons who don't drive out of harms way. Access to Universities, Colleges and, The State Capital will help unify the area. Hopefully linking the area's hospitality industry for big events like NASCAR, Music, Film and, Art Festivals and possibly future Olympic Games.
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