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Old 01-28-2013, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,589 posts, read 5,342,694 times
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Public-transport costs: Why American transport projects cost so much | The Economist

An excellent question if you ask me. Litigation and red tape come first to mind. Thoughts?
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Old 01-28-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Wages and salaries, just like in any organization. (My educated guess w/o reading the article.)
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,589 posts, read 5,342,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Wages and salaries, just like in any organization. (My educated guess w/o reading the article.)
The thing is the analysis compared the US to other developed countries like Spain and Japan.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:37 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,765 posts, read 62,818,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
Public-transport costs: Why American transport projects cost so much | The Economist

An excellent question if you ask me. Litigation and red tape come first to mind. Thoughts?
The distance between the longer destinations.
The land values between the closer ones.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:54 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,348,065 times
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for heavy rail construction cost comparisons see:

US Rail Construction Costs | Pedestrian Observations

US is #1 among developed countries. Highways, bridges are also more expensive. This Scandivian bridge connecting Copenhagen, Denmark with Malmo Sweeden

Øresund Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

$5.7 billion for 5 miles of bridge and 2 miles of tunnel with both road and rail.

Tappan Zee Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

proposed replacement:

4 miles of bridge for just road, though with higher traffic volumes
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,141 posts, read 16,238,024 times
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Land values are generally quite low in American, certainly compared to Tokyo. Even NYC and San Francisco aren't outside the realm of normal for international cities. Things are usually measured by distance and then compared to similar projects. It's always been interesting to me as well.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,184 posts, read 103,165,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
The thing is the analysis compared the US to other developed countries like Spain and Japan.
Well, maybe they pay construction workers less. Someone could do an analysis. Hard to believe there would be less red tape in a semi-socialist country like Spain (or Scandinavia, mentioned above).
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:59 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,160,000 times
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Could it be the public involvement processes, environmental impact statements, and civil rights/environmental justice concerns? I have no idea if we're unique in the amount of stuff we have to do before a thing is built.
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,141 posts, read 16,238,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
for heavy rail construction cost comparisons see:

US Rail Construction Costs | Pedestrian Observations

US is #1 among developed countries. Highways, bridges are also more expensive. This Scandivian bridge connecting Copenhagen, Denmark with Malmo Sweeden

Øresund Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

$5.7 billion for 5 miles of bridge and 2 miles of tunnel with both road and rail.

Tappan Zee Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

proposed replacement:

4 miles of bridge for just road, though with higher traffic volumes
Or the Eastern Span of the Bay Bridge. $6.3 billion dollars and 11 years later, it's finally going close to completion. All two miles of it. It is a much more heavily used bridge than Oresund but doesn't carry rail HSR. Rail is a separate tube that's in need of replacement. That's another $10 billion (estimated) although if that works out like the Eastern Span and balloons six-fold...
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Old 01-28-2013, 10:12 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,348,065 times
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The author of the Pedestrian Observations post made this comment further down:

I don’t want to offer explanations for the high costs; the only one I’m even mildly sure about is that US contracting procurement, especially in New York, is so byzantine that the only bidders are too incompetent or corrupt to get private-sector work. I don’t think it’s really because of capitalism-socialism issues, because the costs in both Scandinavia and Singapore are stunningly average. However, I’ve heard either from the MTA’s Making Every Dollar Count report or from a comment on said report that the specific rules in New York force about 50-100% overstaffing, something that at least elsewhere I know does not exist in Scandinavian transit.

Suspect that might be true for New York City, a family member works in a NYC firm who said bidding for government was annoying complicated and something to be avoided.
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