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Old 01-29-2013, 07:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,000 posts, read 102,581,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
I'm working on a SWOT Analysis on the city of Denver by comparing its inner city woes to other major areas in the country. There is a 40 mile corridor that spans from downtown Denver to Aurora that has been deemed a 'hot' zone for intense poverty, limited access, high crime, increased gang activity, and growing dropout rates. I'm wondering what are the most difficult cities in this country for inner-city dwellers to overcome similar living conditions? I will attach my SWOT Analysis on Denver once completed.
What 40 mile corridor are you talking about? Do you mean 40 square miles? Even Colfax Avenue, the nation's longest street, is only 26 miles from Golden to Aurora, through Denver.
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:44 AM
 
215 posts, read 347,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What 40 mile corridor are you talking about? Do you mean 40 square miles? Even Colfax Avenue, the nation's longest street, is only 26 miles from Golden to Aurora, through Denver.
It's not a continuous corridor; there a "spots" of concentrated poverty that exist beyond Colfax Ave - situated in other parts of the Denver Metro (north and south).
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:52 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,000 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
It's not a continuous corridor; there a "spots" of concentrated poverty that exist beyond Colfax Ave - situated in other parts of the Denver Metro (north and south).
I'm aware of that. I've been a public health nurse both up north in Thornton/Northglenn/Commerce City and south, in Englewood/Littleton. But that's not the same as a corridor. I was just curious.
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Here.
13,875 posts, read 12,633,083 times
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I live just outside Detroit and I can't believe what I see when I drive through the city. I don't think any other city comes close except maybe European cities that were subject to extensive aerial bombardment in WWII. In some areas it's beyond ghetto...more like "post-apocalyptic" in that once densely populated areas have actually reverted back to nature - kind of like driving through the country (with free-ranging pheasants to boot). But most areas still contain many abandoned homes and buildings that have fallen victim to vandals, scrappers and arsonists.
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Old 02-01-2013, 12:02 AM
 
215 posts, read 347,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm aware of that. I've been a public health nurse both up north in Thornton/Northglenn/Commerce City and south, in Englewood/Littleton. But that's not the same as a corridor. I was just curious.
The Children

I thought I prefaced 40 square mile. The link above is for your records.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:19 AM
 
7,495 posts, read 9,759,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
I'm working on a SWOT Analysis on the city of Denver by comparing its inner city woes to other major areas in the country. There is a 40 mile corridor that spans from downtown Denver to Aurora that has been deemed a 'hot' zone for intense poverty, limited access, high crime, increased gang activity, and growing dropout rates. I'm wondering what are the most difficult cities in this country for inner-city dwellers to overcome similar living conditions? I will attach my SWOT Analysis on Denver once completed.
There are certainly cities that have a hard time overcoming this problem. To think of some of the worst, I suppose Detroit, Gary, St. Louis, etc. come to mind.

On a side note, Denver is no angel for how it deals with its own issues of poverty and high crime. Their ideas of fighting poverty are to push them out and build fancy houses for new money. If they can't do that, then they ignore it. They were especially hard on homeless folks during the whole occupy movement, which homeless people really had no hand in here. They were the ones that paid for it what with the new law criminalizing sleeping outside.

The cops here are for the most part a joke. They prefer to drive around at all hours and pull over innocent people and harass them for no reason rather than actually patrolling high crime areas looking for real criminals and trying to find criminals who get away with this crap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
I don't know why, but it surprises me that Denver has an inner-city problem. Other than the mass shootings in nearby suburbs, I have hardly ever heard about crime and poverty that goes on there.
That's because Denver prefers to pretend it doesn't exist and pay journalist to talk about how great Denver is.

I don't mean to sound bitter. It's true that I can't stand this place and really want to leave. I also get tired of this city portraying this place as something it's not. Every city has problems and if Denver would admit that it's no different, imagine the possibilities for actually making progress.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:25 AM
 
7,495 posts, read 9,759,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What 40 mile corridor are you talking about? Do you mean 40 square miles? Even Colfax Avenue, the nation's longest street, is only 26 miles from Golden to Aurora, through Denver.
You're right. Even Commerce City isn't that far.
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:04 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,415,082 times
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Not to sound too nit-picky, but are you looking specifically for poverty within city limits ("inner-city") or just metro area urban (versus rural) poverty? Mostly I ask that because I've been reading the book "The Great Inversion," which focuses on the shifting of the old model -- urban core poor, suburbs wealthy -- to where increasing poverty (and many of the problems that plague high-poverty neighborhoods) are now in the suburbs, making the old "inner-city" description a bit out-dated. I've certainly seen that dynamic at work in some of the places we've lived. Of course there are still many high-poverty, high-crime areas that are still within old "inner-city" locations, if those are what you are primarily investigating, but I'm guessing, given the reference to Aurora, that you just mean high-poverty high-crime neighborhoods in metro areas, even if not inner-city?
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:21 AM
 
215 posts, read 347,236 times
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@uptown - That's an interesting perspective you present. I'm from a small town in Arkansas. I've seen rural poverty and it's nothing to play around with. I would love to hear more about your findings.

@osito - I like the way you cut right to the point. I don't disagree with one thing you have said. I'm a stakeholder in admitting there is a problem and we have to do something about it sooner than later. Where are you trying to move to next?
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Old 02-14-2013, 04:48 PM
 
7,495 posts, read 9,759,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Milehigh View Post
@uptown - That's an interesting perspective you present. I'm from a small town in Arkansas. I've seen rural poverty and it's nothing to play around with. I would love to hear more about your findings.

@osito - I like the way you cut right to the point. I don't disagree with one thing you have said. I'm a stakeholder in admitting there is a problem and we have to do something about it sooner than later. Where are you trying to move to next?
Somewhere warmer for starters, lol, but I'm still deciding.
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