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Old 01-29-2013, 04:48 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,266,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Watch Dawn of the Dead. Great zombie movie(sequal to Night of the Living Dead) and a bit of a commentary on mall-culture, which was peaking around the release of the film.

I saw that one. good movie. since then I can't go past a shopping mall, dead or not, without thinking about zombies. it would be funny if someone did a parody called Dawn of the Dead Shopping Mall.
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Old 01-29-2013, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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Our anchor stores are staying, but the rest of the mall is being torn down and rebuilt.

Jeff Mckay, Lee District Supervisor, Recalls Springfield Mall's Bright Past, Looks Toward Brighter Future | wusa9.com
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:10 PM
 
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My current nearby malls, the Livingston Mall, Short Hills Mall, and my previous long-time go-to mall, the mighty King Of Prussia Mall, all going strong. Even the once half-dead Coventry Mall (a few miles from King of Prussia) has been revived. I think reports of the death of the mall are greatly exaggerated. A lot of malls died, but mostly killed by other malls.

The OPs story is an argument against regional planning; why should downtown have veto power over building elsewhere?
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:20 PM
 
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I think it's not that the malls changed the community, but the communities changed the mall.

Many, once primarily Caucasian middle class neighborhoods and suburbs turn into primarily Latino and African-American working class neighborhoods, and the malls in those neighborhoods die or become "discounter" malls.

Examples in CA:

Santa Maria Town Center in Santa Maria
Panorama City Mall in Panorama City (LA)
Hanford Mall in Hanford
Merced Mall in Merced
Bayshore Mall in Eureka
County Fair Mall in Woodland
Eastmont Town Center in Oakland (now just a mall building with a discount grocery market and police station)

Some malls, are evolving from their middle class routes into upper middle class enclosed malls or into upper middle class outdoor malls.

Ex in CA:
Del Monte Center in Monterey
La Cumbre Plaza in Santa Barbara
Pacific View Mall in Ventura
Santa Monica Place in Santa Monica
Sunnyvale Town Center (still in the process of turning enclosed into outdoor) in Sunnyvale

In the case of my town, the mall didn't even get a chance. People forced the developer to build a one-department store mall which would not succeed. However, the change of department stores shows a shift in the community from middle to upper middle class.

I know in the case of the Santa Maria Town Center that the wealthier people and Caucasian people prefer to shop in the safer, more affluent areas and not go to the downtown where the mall is. The Santa Maria Mall today lives because it has the only Macy's around, a planned movie theater, and the affluent Latinos and working class Latinos in the area shop there.
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:59 PM
 
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I live 45 minutes from the nearest mall, and since it's the only one for many miles around it, it's pretty lively. But I have to say, malls in general really depress me. No matter where they are, there's some combination of Sears, Macy's, Penney's, Claire's, Forever 21, Bath and Body Works, a bookstore, Foot Locker, a chain jewelry store, etc. I just find them soul-crushing places and it saddens me that some young people actually think they're a suitable place to hang out.
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:07 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,893,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo-e View Post
I live 45 minutes from the nearest mall, and since it's the only one for many miles around it, it's pretty lively. But I have to say, malls in general really depress me. No matter where they are, there's some combination of Sears, Macy's, Penney's, Claire's, Forever 21, Bath and Body Works, a bookstore, Foot Locker, a chain jewelry store, etc. I just find them soul-crushing places and it saddens me that some young people actually think they're a suitable place to hang out.
Instead of using names for the stores trying saying that every retail shopping destination has the same things. Same jewelry, clothing, shoe, book stores, and types of coffee shops in a downtown. At least I know most malls have free parking and some of the stores prices are better.
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Canada
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I don't think any of the two metros I've lived in have any dead malls. There seems to be a big shortage of malls in Canada generally TBH, they keep trying to expand them. What, may I ask, was the reason for there becoming a glut of malls in the US?
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:29 AM
 
1,263 posts, read 2,771,697 times
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Out of control teenagers started to go there on buses after school, causing fights, shoplifting sprees and general chaos. There were a few big riot-style mass brawls that got on the news. There was a gang shooting in the parking lot on Saturday night. Middle class shoppers got nervous and stopped shopping there.

The mall grew a reputation as unsafe (although it wasn't really), so the more expensive stores left when their leases came up. Each year the mall got worse and worse until it was just trinkets and cheap no-name club clothes being sold. The dollar store was the most popular store.

Last time I went there (craving Taco Bell in the food court) they'd opened a large discount hair weave store just off the main atrium. That made me LOL. The door was broken off the women's bathroom by the food court, and the parking ramps had been leased to an auto dealership for car inventory storage. Bye-bye mall!
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Old 01-30-2013, 12:33 AM
 
16,437 posts, read 19,140,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL_Whut View Post

Last time I went there (craving Taco Bell in the food court) they'd opened a large discount hair weave store just off the main atrium. That made me LOL. The door was broken off the women's bathroom by the food court, and the parking ramps had been leased to an auto dealership for car inventory storage. Bye-bye mall!
Bye-bye America. The barbarians have taken over.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:44 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,266,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo-e View Post
I live 45 minutes from the nearest mall, and since it's the only one for many miles around it, it's pretty lively. But I have to say, malls in general really depress me. No matter where they are, there's some combination of Sears, Macy's, Penney's, Claire's, Forever 21, Bath and Body Works, a bookstore, Foot Locker, a chain jewelry store, etc. I just find them soul-crushing places and it saddens me that some young people actually think they're a suitable place to hang out.
but where else are young people going to hang out? in many communities the shopping mall is one of the few places people can go to hang out with other people. for many the options are limited. the mall is a poor substitute for public space. but its usually the only option people have to be in the company with other people, because there are no good public spaces. either that or sit home in front of your tv and computer all day. the modern built environment is a very anti-social one. it is a very isolating environment. its not surprising then that it breeds a lot of anti-social behavior, depression, alienation, neurosis and other mental health problems in people particularly the young.
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