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Old 02-03-2013, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
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Teenagers started hanging out, didn't buy much but drove other shoppers away.
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Old 02-03-2013, 07:58 PM
 
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The need for malls has passed its peak. On-line, phone order, and mail order shopping have become steadily more popular. Most Americans have less money to spend--average real incomes have been falling steadily for four decades (with a brief interruption in the late 90's). Housing costs have increased more quickly than nominal incomes, further eroding people's discretionary income for shopping. At the top of the income spectrum, things are different, and the high end malls aren't closing.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
The need for malls has passed its peak. On-line, phone order, and mail order shopping have become steadily more popular. Most Americans have less money to spend--average real incomes have been falling steadily for four decades (with a brief interruption in the late 90's). Housing costs have increased more quickly than nominal incomes, further eroding people's discretionary income for shopping. At the top of the income spectrum, things are different, and the high end malls aren't closing.
Disagree. People love to shop. They love to be mixing with other people. But they hate driving to a monolith surrounded by football field sized parking lots and then walking into an completely artificial environment.

The places succeeding now, have retail, shops, bars cafes, intermixed with residences, parks, offices...in otherwords...people are crave and pay a premium to be in what we used to call a "town".
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:11 PM
 
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I think you're right that people now prefer more open, town-like shopping centers. But I believe the overall amount of retail space, at least on a per capita basis, is also shrinking, maybe somebody has some data at hand.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Disagree. People love to shop. They love to be mixing with other people. But they hate driving to a monolith surrounded by football field sized parking lots and then walking into an completely artificial environment.
No, they don't. Especially not in winter, when the real environment stinks.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wartrace View Post
Teenagers started hanging out, didn't buy much but drove other shoppers away.
That can't be it.

[the mall has been a teenage hangout for decades]
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
No, they don't. Especially not in winter, when the real environment stinks.
Which is why, of course, indoor malls all over America are dying and town centers all over America are hugely in demand
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
That can't be it.

[the mall has been a teenage hangout for decades]
Yes, and many a mall owner has tried to chase away the teenagers.... then wondered why the malls were dying.
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Old 02-04-2013, 05:54 PM
 
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The local mall in my hometown of Wilson, NC died because of Walmart/new strip malls that sprung in the western part of town and a decline of the area around the mall, which started in the 90s. The interesting thing is the same thing happened with downtown, which use to be thriving before I was born but died when the mall sprung up. It's kind of sad that the city can't support downtown, the mall, and some of the newer developments.
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Old 02-04-2013, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Glendale, CA
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In my neck of the woods we have an established mall (Glendale Galleria) that fought like hell against a new "lifestyle center" opening across the street (the Americana at Brand). It was a nasty political fight between the owners of the Galleria and the developer of the Americana (who also built the Grove in LA) and the voters ultimately decided the issue (Americana was barely approved).

The interesting thing that happened is that the Americana has actually stimulated traffic at both malls, with lots of people walking across the street to go from one to the other. The Americana poached the Nordstroms from the Galleria, but a Bloomingdales is taking its place. The Galleria is now going through a complete renovation from its previous 80s era tackiness.

There are even Apple Stores in both malls, across the street from each other.

The mall didn't die but actually is making itself better when forced to deal with the Lifestyle Center competition.
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