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Old 10-01-2015, 08:38 AM
 
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Mine didn't. It added some "big box" stores on the periphery and reduced the boutiques, but it lives on.
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Old 10-02-2015, 08:37 PM
 
Location: ohio
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In my city, the closest dead mall to me is Northland Mall. It was a medium sized mall, with 3 anchors Sears, Penney, and Lazarus/Macys. It was always very busy in the 80s, then started to struggle in the 90s as newer malls were built downtown and in the upper class northwest part of Columbus, and the area surrounding Nothrland mall declined. It finally closed in 2003. The Lazarus building became offices, the rest was torn down. Menards and a county animal shelter now occupy the land.

DeadMalls.com: Northland Mall: Columbus, Ohio
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Old 10-03-2015, 12:20 AM
 
Location: USA
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It got fully remodeled, and many high end boutiques moved in. They even added a "outer ring" of stores that surround the mall itself. The area has been gentrifying over the years so it's no surprise. Not far from me there is another mall that hasn't been updated since the 1980s. It has lower end options like McDonalds and PayLess Shoes.
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Old 10-03-2015, 07:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
Kaaboom is right. I lived only 10 minutes away from Cinderella City Shopping Mall. It was an amazing place while it lasted. My favorite spot was Cinder Alley. More hippie shops than you could shake a stick at. I bought a lot of tapes and lp's at Big Value, several decopa'ges at the place right next to it (name escapes me.)

It opened up in March of 1968, it was supposed to be a model for future malls. In fact I, along with a dozen other people who went to Englewood High School passed out fliers the day it opened. The city had every entrance to the mall and a few people inside the main entrance covered. The fliers were basically a map of the place to show where all the stores were. During 1968 to the early 1980's it was THE place to shop. The place was busy all the time.

Finally the competition caught up with them, Cherry Creek Mall from the east, Southwest Plaza to the southwest, and Southglenn Mall to the south. Southglenn mall shut down several years ago and replaced it with a bunch of small stores.
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Old 10-03-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Rolling Acres Mall in Akron closed for a number of reasons. Groups of teenagers shoplifting, fighting, harrassing people. The other two malls in the metro area got bigger, and the shopping complexes around those malls grew bigger as well. I believe that the same happened with Randall Park Mall in Cleveland.

When I was in Dayton, OH, Salem Mall in Trotwood had a number of incidents of women getting raped, and people getting robbed behind the mall where few people parked at. In the end, none of the stores on the top level were open. It did have a movie theater on the inside, but it could only be accessed from the outside. They also had a post office inside the mall, and the food court was closed. It was eventually torn down.

Where I live at now the malls aren't in the suburbs so it is very difficult for a mall to close. Two of the malls in this area, Chesapeake Square Mall and Military Circle Mall SHOULD close, but I'm not sure when, or if, it will ever happen. They have been in that "dead mall" status now for at least 10 years. It will be a slow and painful death, unlike the quick descent of malls in other metro areas.
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Old 10-09-2015, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Rochester
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Two of our malls here in Rochester, NY have bit the dust. Three remain.

The first one to go was our downtown's iconic Midtown Plaza, which was also a pet project of Victor Gruen and the United States' first urban indoor shopping mall. Despite being acclaimed at the time as a shining jewel and answer to urban America's problems, a model for the rest of the nation to compete with suburbanization, just the opposite occurred very quickly. Midtown Plaza opened in 1962 as a giant complex in the center of downtown that included not only the mall, but several office buildings, a Greyhound bus terminal, a Wegmans grocery store, and a 17-story hotel with a restaurant and observation deck at the top.

Midtown Plaza was beloved in Rochester for many years, but began to slowly decline along with the rest of downtown just about as soon as it opened. Around the mid-1970s things started to change. Downtown was really beginning to empty out. White flight and suburbanization took a major toll on the city. New malls in the suburbs began rapidly opening, driving business out of the urban core. A stigma of crime also began to develop as teenagers from the city transfered on public buses rather than school buses (this actually continues to this day) bringing along fights every so often. Suburbanite shoppers started to feel unsafe at the mall, so they chose to shop elsewhere.

In 1980, the hotel at Midtown closed. The high rise remained office space, however. In the early 1990s, Wegmans, B. Foreman's and McCurdy's all closed down. Those were the anchors of the mall and their loss truly proved to be a major blow to the viability of the complex. By the turn of the 21st century, not much remained in Midtown Plaza other than some fast food joints and a few discount clothing stores.

In 2007, it was announced that the mall would be torn down via eminent domain and replaced with a 500 foot skyscraper and world headquarters for PAETEC. The entire complex except for the former hotel high rise was in fact demolished. Unfortunately, PAETEC dragged their feet, downscaled their plans until they were eventually bought out by Windstream. Today the former site of Midtown Plaza is mostly vacant, shovel-ready space. Windstream occupies a small 3-story office building, Gannett is constructing an even smaller 3-story office building adjacent to it, and the former hotel tower is being redeveloped as a mixed-use apartment tower with retail at the base.

The downfall of our second shopping mall was much more swift. Irondequoit Mall opened in 1990 as Rochester's largest shopping mall. The 2-story, 1 million square foot mall was to be the region's upscale shopping destination. Located in the city's largest northeastern suburb, it was expected to draw crowds from the east side and to compete with the then outdated malls in the southern and western suburbs.

Sadly, Irondequoit Mall would not even thrive for a decade. By '95, the other suburban malls expanded. Very soon, shoppers favored the other malls as rumors of crime plagued Irondequoit. Likely due to our city bus system servicing the mall very well, suburbanite shoppers once again believed this mall to be dangerous due to a certain demographic frequenting the place. These rumors turned out to be completely false, yet the media ran with them and the public latched on to the idea, effectively killing the mall by 2000.

In 2006, a standalone Target was built next to the mall. Other than that, all that remains today is literally an empty, shuttered building anchored by Sears. The Syracuse-based owner owes millions in taxes, civil suits and other fees, yet refuses to do anything about his property. It looks like this one will remain empty for many years to come.
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Old 10-13-2015, 09:52 AM
 
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The first mall in RI (originally Midland later RI Mall) is basically dead as an indoor mall. It still has anchors at the ends (Walmart, Kohl's, and Sears), but the indoor arcade connecting them has been closed for years and sits vacant between thriving anchors. The larger Warwick Mall is visible directly across the highway and the area is saturated with big box retailers.
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Old 10-13-2015, 11:54 AM
 
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My mall is still running but it is mostly women in single room complexs shopping for there children. It had

Book stores,
Video stores
Videogame stores

and so many things. The mall was under reconstruction and while we had gang problems it was not a big of deal. I almost got put in the hospital over a game display in what was sears.

Time passed and the mall was revamped. Then big stores like bestbuy moved in. Gone is the giant size Spencer stores with real handcuffs, breast enlargement pills, and giant scary rats. Gone are the book stores with just about every book including textbooks. Gone are the Video stores. Recently the last game chain closed.

The mall is rather empty most of the time now. What was a busy centre or shopping area is naked.

...........................

In another area there was this Galleria type mall. It was really nice. In the end TARGET moved in and took away business from that area. It turned into an low-life mall. where people were selling edge weapons and tattoos. Gone are the Koisks. The target store is also so ugly now.

.......................

Then Target made another store and it turned our area into downtown part 2. It is taking away business from most malls because all these witches are using tracking purchase key-chains. So now Target knows where most of there shoppers are from and who lives there.

So now our mall stores are extermly empty and most of the business is some knocked up divorce mother type persons. It is so ugly and sad.








Everything looks like garbage and is made out of cardboard filling.
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Old 10-13-2015, 12:04 PM
 
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Our mall was dead, until recently when a California developer came along and is now turning the mall inside out. Instead of a mall where you go in and walk inside the mall, they are making it into what I call a strip mall, where you walk outside to all the different stores, instead of walking inside. (Hope this makes sense.)

I think they are calling this an "open air mall".... which is really going to suck seeing as how it rains and is cold and chilly 9 months out of the year here. We used to use the mall as a place to walk for exercise. So that is now gone. And we now have our cities first Panera Bread and a Hobby Lobby. Whatever. I'd rather have my indoor walking space. But they didn't ask me what I wanted. Poo.
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Old 10-13-2015, 12:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missladytexas View Post
Our local mall is still alive and well. It is dead on week days but booming on weekends. Texas still loves the mall. There is a nice outlet mall but it's 45 miles away and I still prefer the indoor mall here in town because it's air-conditioned throughout. Even walking in and out of the outlet mall stores that are air-conditioned is very uncomfortable in the 100 degree summer heat here in Texas.
I miss my Texas malls. My regular mall was Northpark, but we also spent a lot of time at the Galleria Mall. THOSE are such good malls! I didn't know how good we had it until we moved away. We've lived in several other states now, and aside from a mall we visited in Honolulu Hawaii, no other malls have come close to Northpark or the Galleria.
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