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Old 01-31-2013, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,179 posts, read 103,138,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
The feds who took things up, and the people who founded the EPA were mostly born before 1946 as well. Every generation builds on what was done before - Rachel Carsons and Jane Jacobs built on something much older "The earth is the Lord's and the fullness thereof, "

What I admire about the millenials is how much they have taken it to heart, and built it into their daily lives.
You gave me a good laugh there. I know a lot of millennials, and I don't see how they're living much differently than any of the rest of us.

 
Old 01-31-2013, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,193,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You gave me a good laugh there. I know a lot of millennials, and I don't see how they're living much differently than any of the rest of us.
I believe in general Millennials are at least aware and better educated about this kind of thing than previous generations. I've read articles that take it either way - that they are educated and do something about it more than any other generation, and also that they are educated but generally do not act.

I think more than a generational thing, it is that in the last decade environmental issues have come to the forefront of our consciousness. Millennials happened to "come of age" in this era, so it is easier to form our habits to be more eco-friendly, vs. older people who have to change habits, which is always harder.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,179 posts, read 103,138,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I believe in general Millennials are at least aware and better educated about this kind of thing than previous generations. I've read articles that take it either way - that they are educated and do something about it more than any other generation, and also that they are educated but generally do not act.

I think more than a generational thing, it is that in the last decade environmental issues have come to the forefront of our consciousness. Millennials happened to "come of age" in this era, so it is easier to form our habits to be more eco-friendly, vs. older people who have to change habits, which is always harder.
You obviously weren't a young adult in the late 60s/early 70s. It was the same thing.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 09:46 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,839 posts, read 10,779,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You gave me a good laugh there. I know a lot of millennials, and I don't see how they're living much differently than any of the rest of us.

1. their attention to sustainability of food and other products they buy. Not all do this, but its a much bigger thing than it was 30 years ago, or even 15 years ago

2. Their turn from autocentricity - granted a good number of boomers pioneered urban areas 30 years ago, but its much closer to universal now, and they are much less likely to hang on to their cars when they do so than in our time

3. biking - when we turned from the auto, we mostly assumed transit and walking were the only options. They have moved biking forward in a big way as the third option.

4. Politics - while many of us supported environmentalism, it was generally a lesser concern than other progressive issues, and of little concern to non-progressives. AFAICT its practically their number one progressive concern (maybe gay marriage matches it for intensity) and it even seeps into the non-"progressives" - note for example the whole semi-libertarian "market urbanism" movement.

5. sustainable gardening/native plants

6. Their choices of automotive vehicles
 
Old 01-31-2013, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,839 posts, read 10,779,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You obviously weren't a young adult in the late 60s/early 70s. It was the same thing.

I was a teenager in the mid 1970s, and I do not share your memory.

Environmentalism was a lesser issue than foreign policy, feminism, and several other concerns. And it was almost wholly focused on policy issues - clean air and water acts, and the battle over nuclear power.

As far as PERSONAL change, you either had extremists trying turn away from consumer culture generally, or you had folks who made no changes in their lives - or maybe did some modest recycling, and that was it.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,557 posts, read 60,221,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
I think more than a generational thing, it is that in the last decade environmental issues have come to the forefront of our consciousness.
The last decade? LOL

Creation of the EPA, the first Earth Day, the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, Endangered Species Act ... All that happened in the 70s and was very much at the "forefront of our consciousness."

The Sierra Club was founded in the 1890s, for heaven's sake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You obviously weren't a young adult in the late 60s/early 70s. It was the same thing.
What Kat said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
1. their attention to sustainability of food and other products they buy.
The majority of the people I see at the local farm markets are in their 40s and older.

Quote:
2. Their turn from autocentricity - granted a good number of boomers pioneered urban areas 30 years ago, but its much closer to universal now, and they are much less likely to hang on to their cars when they do so than in our time
Instead they bum rides from their friends who do have cars.

Quote:
sustainable gardening/native plants
What you hear from millennials is that they either don't want to be saddled with mortgages like their evil parents are, or they can't afford to buy houses because Baby Boomers aren't dying off fast enough for them to get the Boomers' jobs and their houses. Where are they planting all these native plants?
 
Old 01-31-2013, 10:19 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,331,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Instead they bum rides from their friends who do have cars.
And there are plenty that don't. Just because some you know do bum rides doesn't mean you can generalize. I didn't, and the ones I know don't, unless you count group trips.

If you referring to carpooling, carpooling was more common decades maybe even for the babyboom generation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You obviously weren't a young adult in the late 60s/early 70s. It was the same thing.
Looking at numbers from back then, the general trend was a large flight away from cities. That doesn't really exist today.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,193,407 times
Reputation: 3985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
The last decade? LOL

Creation of the EPA, the first Earth Day, the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, Endangered Species Act ... All that happened in the 70s and was very much at the "forefront of our consciousness."

The Sierra Club was founded in the 1890s, for heaven's sake.


What Kat said.


The majority of the people I see at the local farm markets are in their 40s and older.


Instead they bum rides from their friends who do have cars.


What you hear from millennials is that they either don't want to be saddled with mortgages like their evil parents are, or they can't afford to buy houses because Baby Boomers aren't dying off fast enough for them to get the Boomers' jobs and their houses. Where are they planting all these native plants?
I was talking about the awareness of global warming. While not a brand-new issue, it is certainly more in the forefront of the debate than it was even in the early 90s. That's all that I am saying, obviously environmentalism is not a new thing. As a Californian, I am very, very aware of John Muir and my favorite Prez was always Teddy Roosevelt.

Some of you guys on this board are really condescending. Not sure why you are so defensive, I am making a point of not bashing boomers because I know how sensitive some of the posters on this thread are about their generation.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 402,941 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
The last decade? LOL

Creation of the EPA, the first Earth Day, the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, Endangered Species Act ... All that happened in the 70s and was very much at the "forefront of our consciousness."

The Sierra Club was founded in the 1890s, for heaven's sake.


What Kat said.


The majority of the people I see at the local farm markets are in their 40s and older.


Instead they bum rides from their friends who do have cars.


What you hear from millennials is that they either don't want to be saddled with mortgages like their evil parents are, or they can't afford to buy houses because Baby Boomers aren't dying off fast enough for them to get the Boomers' jobs and their houses. Where are they planting all these native plants?
Such a big generalization, most people my age take it as their responsibility to get around, you know why? Because it is their responsibility. Even with the subpar transit here mostly young people use it.

Hmm, let's see, I know of no young people around here who desire to live in the boomers housing. The things we like are technology, maybe even to a fault, but that is a different discussion. The argument that young people want to move to cities to rebel? That is not the reason at all, yet some keep generalizing it is.
 
Old 01-31-2013, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,193,407 times
Reputation: 3985
Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
Such a big generalization, most people my age take it as their responsibility to get around, you know why? Because it is their responsibility. Even with the subpar transit here mostly young people use it.

Hmm, let's see, I know of no young people around here who desire to live in the boomers housing. The things we like are technology, maybe even to a fault, but that is a different discussion. The argument that young people want to move to cities to rebel? That is not the reason at all, yet some keep generalizing it is.
Yep, I mentioned this in another thread.

When I was living in Boston I could not afford a car right after I graduated from college - about half of my friends had cars... I never bummed a ride, and only once my wife and I borrowed my friends seldom-used SUV / wagon car to make a trip to Target (which we usually walked 2.5 miles each way to get to otherwise - we did this trip at least a dozen times in 2 years).

Maybe my friends were bumming rides but for the most part they seemed to slog it out on the 86 bus just like I did.

Last edited by munchitup; 01-31-2013 at 10:34 AM.. Reason: Just measured the actual distance.
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