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Old 02-02-2013, 09:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
There are plenty of people who live in San Francisco who consider it a great imposition to leave the city, and rarely do. Most employed San Francisco residents still work in San Francisco. Pretty much anything people want to do--including going to big box stores like Costco--can be done within San Francisco. I think if anything San Francisco's geographic isolation--with a land connection only in one direction--encourages people there to feel separate. So you can, as the OP asked about, live in the city you use which doesn't have suburbs.
But it's hardly a city with little or zero suburban area, not by a longshot.
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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Bottom line: the OP asked a (very broad) question with a practical answer and a literal answer, and we're all busily trying to answer from one perspective or the other, or a combination. And it doesn't appear he/she has been back to comment on any of the members replies...
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,129,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
The old Mapping L.A. site had "Central L.A." (Minus the Hollywood Hills) at 800,000 in 46 sq miles, practically identical to San Francisco. No doubt the population here remains in that range. The few neighborhoods that lost population were negated by sizeable population increases in DTLA and Chinatown. The borders included all 6 sq miles that comprise DT, plus 4,200 acre Griffith Park and some low density nabes like Hancock Park, so this isn't a cherrypicked area.

Central L.A. - Mapping L.A. - Los Angeles Times

I'm guessing that the multi-unit housing in this area is in the 75-80% range. Keep in mind that WeHo, the westernmost neighborhood in this area is 89% multi-unit housing.
Interesting I always thought WeHo seemed to have more SFH than most of the rest of Central LA.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
There are plenty of people who live in San Francisco who consider it a great imposition to leave the city, and rarely do. Most employed San Francisco residents still work in San Francisco. Pretty much anything people want to do--including going to big box stores like Costco--can be done within San Francisco. I think if anything San Francisco's geographic isolation--with a land connection only in one direction--encourages people there to feel separate. So you can, as the OP asked about, live in the city you use which doesn't have suburbs.
One of my coworkers commutes from San Francisco into Richmond everyday - actually was something I was strongly considering too until my move to LA.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
Interesting I always thought WeHo seemed to have more SFH than most of the rest of Central LA.
It's pretty built up. Most of WeHo looks like this:

http://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetview...328165279,,0,0

Its moderate density (18,000 ppsm) is more a product of relatively small household sizes and several unpopulated areas (along Sunset, SM, La Cienega, etc.).

L.A. seems to be far less populated along its main arterials compared to other cities with similar core density. Not sure on that one though.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
It's pretty built up. Most of WeHo looks like this:

Google Maps Street View

Its moderate density (18,000 ppsm) is more a product of relatively small household sizes and several unpopulated areas (along Sunset, SM, La Cienega, etc.).

L.A. seems to be far less populated along its main arterials compared to other cities with similar core density. Not sure on that one though.
I was thinking about the patches of SFH along Fountain and in the western corners of WeHo. Just seems to have a higher proportion of them then the rest of Central LA. Of course Hancock Park throws the average off.

Great point about the arterials. You mentioned it before, it is the final frontier of development.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:34 PM
 
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100% european? Cities in europe have suburban areas too. London is sprawled out and paris is somewhat sprawled out. I would say the city with least amount of suburban looking areas would be new york but the most compact metro in terms of density is Los Angeles at 2100 ppl per sq mile.
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
100% european? Cities in europe have suburban areas too. London is sprawled out and paris is somewhat sprawled out. I would say the city with least amount of suburban looking areas would be new york but the most compact metro in terms of density is Los Angeles at 2100 ppl per sq mile.
Is it really any different than saying the suburbs are just farther away from NYC (by virtue of NYC's size)?
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:39 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Is it really any different than saying the suburbs are just farther away from NYC (by virtue of NYC's size)?
what are you referring to?
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Old 02-02-2013, 02:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
hard to find much in the way of detached houses. New York is bigger than Paris, and eventually has much more low density areas but it takes a long distance before finding lots of blocks of houses.
You can find much more suburban-looking areas nearer to Midtown, but you have to cross the Hudson; much of Weehawken is single-family detached homes. Weehawken's still very dense, however.
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