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Old 02-02-2013, 03:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Paris on the Anacostia

Interesting proposal but would the wetlands be allowed to be developed? I'm sure many groups would fight a proposal to do this. It would allow substantial growth without displacement of current residents though. Interesting proposal and design though. You only see this in old world Europe so it would be interesting either way. What are your thought's on the design?

What about?

A Trash-Free Anacostia Watershed is possible. Some of the ways:
The Anacostia River Cleanup and Protection Act of 2009 requires stores that sell food to charge 5 for each plastic or paper bag sold. A portion of this fee goes to a special fund aimed at new efforts to restore and protect the Anacostia River.
Attached Thumbnails
Paris on the Anacostia River in D.C.?-anacostia-river-debris.jpg  
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Old 02-02-2013, 03:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermobile View Post
What about?

A Trash-Free Anacostia Watershed is possible. Some of the ways:
The Anacostia River Cleanup and Protection Act of 2009 requires stores that sell food to charge 5 for each plastic or paper bag sold. A portion of this fee goes to a special fund aimed at new efforts to restore and protect the Anacostia River.
where does all that trash come from? are people tossing their trash straight into the river or does it come mainly from the sewers?
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Old 02-02-2013, 03:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Portland took out a riverfront expressway. Freeways can also be buried or capped. With all the redevelopment in Washington, it seems like the Anacostia waterfront is going to be ripe for rediscovery soon.
Portland was able to remove the freeway because with the construction of Interstate 5 and 405 through Portland as well as Interstate 205, less people used the Harbor Drive freeway. Removing it wasn't that big of a deal.

Burying a freeway can be expensive. I think this plan was doomed when the 11th Street Bridge was rebuilt to connect I-395 S to 295 N. I like the idea but but it should have been brought up years ago.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:53 PM
 
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New York City has made a good deal of progress in cleaning up and creating parks along the Bronx River, which also had suffered pretty terrible development and contamination.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The Charles is nice, but some spots are nearly adjacent to an arterial. Some spots are noiser than others. The bike/walking path on the Boston side of the river is well done. Definitely a great city spots, but not perfect.

The Los Angeles River might have competition for a "better" worst river. Marks the border between Brooklyn and Queens:

Channelization made it one of the most heavily used bodies of water in the Port of New York and New Jersey and thus one of the most polluted industrial sites in America, containing years of discarded toxins, an estimated 30 million US gallons (110,000 m3) of spilled oil, and raw sewage from New York City’s sewer system... Its outgoing flow of 14,000 million US gallons (53,000,000 m3)/year consists of combined sewer overflow, urban runoff, raw domestic sewage, and industrial wastewater. The creek is largely stagnant, one cause in the 15-foot-thick (4.6 m) layer of polluted “black mayonnaise” that has congealed on the creek bed

Newtown Creek - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

the photo from the link has a strong industrial wasteland / concrete jungle look. Los Angeles River does look kinda similar in its wiki page.
Is the Newtown Creek a "creek" in the way the East River is a "river"? If so I think the LA River takes its spot back as best worst inner city river.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:48 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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To go back to one of the questions: the wetlands will never be developed. That ship (filling in marshes) sailed years ago.

As far as trash, much of it comes from the storm sewers when people just drop what they're carrying on the ground. I was in a very rural part of Anne Arundel County last night and passed a tree that had 3 or 4 plastic grocery bags stuck in it. Not a house for a mile in any direction.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:11 AM
LLN
 
Location: Upstairs closet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Portland took out a riverfront expressway. Freeways can also be buried or capped. With all the redevelopment in Washington, it seems like the Anacostia waterfront is going to be ripe for rediscovery soon.
Unfortunately, the only recovery ever gonna happen on the Anacostia is body recovery. But that is a thriving business, already!
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Old 02-04-2013, 12:36 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pantin23 View Post
But cars will eventually be eliminated, walkable communities, and rail will eventually lower their demand.

the pew study a few years ago said about a third of folks would give up space to get walkable. That leaves 2/3 or so who won't. And the folks commuting down 295 mostly already have rail options. They do not work for a variety of reasons. If anything usage of 295 is likely to grow. Even if total VMT nationally were to decline by a third (which is a very aggressive goal) it would be hard to take 295 out.
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Old 02-04-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Portland took out a riverfront expressway. Freeways can also be buried or capped. With all the redevelopment in Washington, it seems like the Anacostia waterfront is going to be ripe for rediscovery soon.

DC is taking out the part of the SE-SW freeway east of the 11th street bridge (to replace it with an urban boulevard) and is capping the center leg part of I395 (which runs in an open cut).

but 295 is not like those cases. Its not a stub end, in an already relatively dense high value area. Its a major connector between maryland, DC, and virginia, and the area its in mostly has plenty of other obstacles to redevelopment. This isnt taking out an urban freeway, so much as taking out a freeway in a semi-urban semi suburban (though the demographics are "urban") freeway, with the PROSPECT that after such removal the area would become more classically urban.

Its also not a completely below grade highway, like the center leg. its heavily at grade or elevated. burying it would be a project on the scale of the big dig - but without the land values that you have in central Boston (or a few miles away in downtown DC for that matter)
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