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Old 02-02-2013, 10:03 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
10+ units per acre is extremely dense.
Really? So where I live is now extremely dense. Guess it depends on what you're used to. This link gives some examples of what 10 units / acre look:

http://www.northamptonma.gov/opd/upl...ty%20Study.pdf

Some look somewhat dense IMO but not are particularly extreme. Medium at most.

*If an area was nothing but residences, 10 units/acre would be somewhere between 12,000-15,000 per square mile depending on number of people per household. But usually there is non-residential or just undeveloped land, so realistically a bit less

Last edited by nei; 02-02-2013 at 10:11 AM..
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:15 AM
 
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None of the above, are you saying the residents would never need to expand roads, no business would never seek a rezoning to tap into the dense market, no open fields for recreation ? Before making a decision reference an existing example of option 1,2, and 3 to let people understand the reality of how a housing area will develop based on people's needs.

High-Income individuals will definitely want exercise amenities, nearby parks, etc. I disagree with the transit oriented development comment. High income individuals will only ride DC Metro train service, they arent riding a bus anytime soon.

This discussion is missing reality. Is the forest inhabited? Are there nuisance creatures in the area, e.g. raccoons, snakes, mosquitoes, if so, guess what?

A perfect example of a wooded urban area is Highland Park, Illinois and Lake Forest, Illinois. BUT, I have ridden my bicycle out there and have seen a fox running in front of me and into a neighborhood. Now how will DC residents treat that issue, that is the question, Will your wooded nature preserve, preserve too much nature for city dwellers?


When you have empty space. It is important to state who currently owns the land to understand the options.

Nei
=====
Northampton is probably not a good example since it is a college town. Many people (New Yorkers, Detroiters, Bostonites, etc) go to Northampton just to experience a hyperliberal existence.

Northampton is also more activist in culture which is unlike suburban DC.
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Old 02-02-2013, 10:21 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Hmm it might important to know what is nearby before deciding.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Canada
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We had a similar problem regarding a chunk of old growth forest owned by the university I go to, the University of British Columbia, which is located in a suburban area near Vancouver. They decided to create Wesbrook Village, a development I think made all the right decisions. Essentially, a fairly dense but peaceful development with a little town centre of 5-6 story midrises with shops at the bottom that tapers to 3-4 story exclusively residential buildings and a few highrises and then it transitions to 3 story townhouses centred around beautiful parks, canals and water features. The sense of community and public spaces is stunning to behold, and it's designed so that everything feels like it's walkable to the woods, with the forest felt to be surrounding the little town. With almost too many of very high quality in a safe and isolated area, big backyards don't feel very needed, although some have small backyards for gardening and barbecues. I wish I could post the google maps, but the development wasn't very far along when the trucks went through. Still, I feel like it's a great model for how things like this should be done.
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Old 02-02-2013, 09:57 PM
 
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They do more things right in Vancouver. BIMBAM, have any photos of this handy?
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Sorry, I menat to write "With almost too many PARKS of very high quality in a safe and isolated area"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
They do more things right in Vancouver. BIMBAM, have any photos of this handy?
Sure, these guys here have an AMAZING slideshow with pictures of the develpment which are way better than the couple of pictures I'm posting here. I can't copy their images, so I'll just leave the link and leave you with the images I found before stumbling upon their site.

UBC Condo For Rent in Spirit at Wesbrook Village #117- 5928 Birney Ave, Vancouver Westside


For my own little collage of photos assembled from google images, I'll start with this map of what's finished so far, you can see that the development will continue to expand outwards into the empty blocks:




The Town Centre area


by: Wasme
UBC Wesbrook Village | Flickr - Photo Sharing!


by: Wasme
All sizes | UBC Wesbrook Village | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Typical condo building:


A park:



The townhouses in front of this park:

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Old 02-02-2013, 11:59 PM
 
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Can an American move in?!
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlite View Post
Can an American move in?!
Sure! This city is full of immigrants .
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,759,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Really? So where I live is now extremely dense. Guess it depends on what you're used to. This link gives some examples of what 10 units / acre look:

http://www.northamptonma.gov/opd/upl...ty%20Study.pdf

Some look somewhat dense IMO but not are particularly extreme. Medium at most.

*If an area was nothing but residences, 10 units/acre would be somewhere between 12,000-15,000 per square mile depending on number of people per household. But usually there is non-residential or just undeveloped land, so realistically a bit less
Do you know if the stats on units/acre usually include the streets too, or just the residential lots?

These are from one of the denser new suburban areas outside Toronto.

1/11 acre lot: REALTOR.ca -Property Details N2549064
1/16 acre lot: REALTOR.ca -Property Details N2537279
1/22 acre townhouse: REALTOR.ca -Property Details N2549214

The density drops by close to a third if you include the street ROW, and a little more if you include larger corner lots and cross streets. At that point, you're looking at about 10 units per acre for a residential area with a mix of the above. The main non-residential use in that area is schools, school yards and parks, followed by strip malls. The school yards look very large, 5-6 acres for the elementary schools, about 9 acres for the one shared between a public and catholic elementary school and 20+ acres for the high school across the street (where there's also a rec centre). The schools and strip malls might bring the density down to around 7 units per acre, although that larger lot house was actually outfitted for a basement apartment/in-law suite, and a few apartment buildings near transit/retail could probably bring the density up to 10 units per acre.

Backyards are relatively small: Vellore, Vaughan, ON - Google Maps

Usually single family housing like that will have more than the average household size, so around 3-3.5 people per household.

I wouldn't consider 10 units per acre extremely dense, especially since some city blocks in Toronto would be about 20 times denser (in terms of population density, already taking into account the different household sizes) if the proposals on them get built. I guess it is quite dense for suburban or single family housing though.

Vancouver (and Victoria) seem to have a lot of very nice modern condos, I wish Toronto had more like that.
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:02 PM
 
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Option 1 and 3 are no longer viable.

10 units per acre is low-medium density. Definitely not high density.
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