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Old 02-13-2013, 08:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What more do you need?
Canadian Tire?
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:24 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,993 posts, read 42,180,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You know, I'm not sure. Where I grew up, the suburban lots were bigger than city lots but not huge. According to zillow, my parents' home had about 8000 sq. ft, and that was a "double" lot. There are some areas outside of Sewickley, which is way closer to Pittsburgh than Patterson Hts, that are on several acres. However, I don't think that's the majority of homes in that area.
Some stats:

For the NYC metro (includes city and suburbs within NY state) median lot size is 0.23 acres; 15% of housing units had one acre or more, 29% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 37% of all housing units.

For the Boston metro, median lot size is 0.40 acres; 26% of housing units had one acre or more, 15% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 52% of housing units.

For the Pittsburgh metro, median lot size is 0.34 acres; 23% of housing units had one acre or more, 20% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 81% of housing units.

For the Denver metro, median lot size is 0.20 acres; 7% of housing units had one acre or more, 20% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 71% of housing units.

For the DC metro, median lot size is 0.32 acres; 17% of housing units had one acre or more, 18% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 68% of housing units.

So yes, Pittsburgh has a slightly larger lot size than DC. The likely reason you may have thought Pittsburgh feels like it has smaller lots is the smaller lots are more common among older homes, when you lived there. Boston "wins" in having the biggest lots, though at the other extreme it has a relatively high amount of multi-family + small lot single-unit homes.

from

http://www.census.gov/housing/ahs/data/metro.html
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: The City
22,349 posts, read 32,274,638 times
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In certain areas, yes
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,463 posts, read 60,058,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Canadian Tire?
Silly me! Of course!

Although if you have Canadian Tire, you don't need anything else.
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Old 02-14-2013, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,113 posts, read 102,899,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Some stats:

For the NYC metro (includes city and suburbs within NY state) median lot size is 0.23 acres; 15% of housing units had one acre or more, 29% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 37% of all housing units.

For the Boston metro, median lot size is 0.40 acres; 26% of housing units had one acre or more, 15% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 52% of housing units.

For the Pittsburgh metro, median lot size is 0.34 acres; 23% of housing units had one acre or more, 20% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 81% of housing units.

For the Denver metro, median lot size is 0.20 acres; 7% of housing units had one acre or more, 20% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 71% of housing units.

For the DC metro, median lot size is 0.32 acres; 17% of housing units had one acre or more, 18% less than 1/8 acre. This only includes housing units that are not in multi-unit buildings (not sure if attached), which is 68% of housing units.

So yes, Pittsburgh has a slightly larger lot size than DC. The likely reason you may have thought Pittsburgh feels like it has smaller lots is the smaller lots are more common among older homes, when you lived there. Boston "wins" in having the biggest lots, though at the other extreme it has a relatively high amount of multi-family + small lot single-unit homes.

from

American Housing Survey (AHS) - Metropolitan Area Summary Data - People and Households - U.S. Census Bureau
I would like to lift up the bold portion for the unbelievers who think I'm just making stuff up when I say that metro Denver has small lots.
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Old 02-14-2013, 07:59 PM
 
7,644 posts, read 9,497,098 times
Reputation: 9030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I would like to lift up the bold portion for the unbelievers who think I'm just making stuff up when I say that metro Denver has small lots.
I believe that everyone in Colorado has the Ponderosa for a front lawn; they just don't have the water to sustain it...
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:50 AM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,888,188 times
Reputation: 3069
There is some false conceptions about suburbs/suburban development and those places could have development of higher density apartments, townhouses, larger buildings.

However, does that eventually change the status of a suburb to becoming a city/town that is not suburban when getting a larger amount of higher density development?

A place can technically qualify as a suburb just for having a lot of dependence on a close proximity larger city centralized downtown area. Maybe a suburb can be quite dense and continue being a suburb if it has mostly an emphasis on residential and has reliance on other cities/towns in the metropolitan region for commercial economic activity.

Not all suburbs are exactly the same and there can be varied differences in Progressive vs. Moderate vs. Conservative suburbs, the level of local diversity, Wealthy vs. Middle class vs. Low income poverty suburbs, and quality of local stores/businesses.

Certain kinds of suburbs may have a significant amount of people that are more inclined and open to have apartment buildings, while other suburbs have a lot of people that moved there to get away from that and would not allow that kind of development to happen.
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