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Old 02-16-2013, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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I don't think the American population will be high enough to necessitate a sea of high-rise apartments in most cities, but that's just a guess on my part.
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Old 02-17-2013, 10:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
I don't think the American population will be high enough to necessitate a sea of high-rise apartments in most cities, but that's just a guess on my part.
Unless the country is condensed, see China.

With greater competition for resources and concern for environmental sustainability, this is a real future possibility.
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Old 02-18-2013, 01:32 AM
 
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I think low and mid-rise apartments/condos/townhomes will be sufficient enough for most American cities in 100 years. Surface parking lots and commercial-only areas will be replaced by denser mixed-use developments and residential-only areas will probably densify too with some single family homes being converted into townhomes.

Here is a side-by-side image of Phoenix (metro pop. 4.2 million) and Mexico City (metro pop. 21.2 million) at roughly the same scale:





Mexico City has a few high rises but not many considering how big it is; most buildings are probably in the 2-6 story range. I think it has an ideal density (15k/sq mile) for a city its size, and I think cities like Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta and Dallas could (and should) reach 20 million without expanding any further outward on their own footprints.

Last edited by abqpsychlist; 02-18-2013 at 02:07 AM..
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Old 02-20-2013, 09:24 PM
 
134 posts, read 162,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abqpsychlist View Post
I think low and mid-rise apartments/condos/townhomes will be sufficient enough for most American cities in 100 years. Surface parking lots and commercial-only areas will be replaced by denser mixed-use developments and residential-only areas will probably densify too with some single family homes being converted into townhomes.

Here is a side-by-side image of Phoenix (metro pop. 4.2 million) and Mexico City (metro pop. 21.2 million) at roughly the same scale:

Mexico City has a few high rises but not many considering how big it is; most buildings are probably in the 2-6 story range. I think it has an ideal density (15k/sq mile) for a city its size, and I think cities like Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta and Dallas could (and should) reach 20 million without expanding any further outward on their own footprints.
I don't think that as the population of the U.S. grows that our urban footprint will stay the same size. I think in some places that might not be culturally or economically suited for high density, there will be an expansion, but in places where more people want to live in a denser environment, it will become more and more common for outer suburban housing tracts to lose value and be reclaimed for agricultural land. With a growing population, there will be a growing demand for food and barring another massive productivity increase on the scale of the bonanza farms of the midwest in the 1870's, that will mean an increase in demand for land.
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: NC
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The United States has PLENTY of land. The population is probably gonna fall for awhile because of so many baby boomers and immigration from Latin America has significantly decreased. Doubt it. But who knows.
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