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Old 02-09-2013, 09:48 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It could affect the number of lanes for a road servicing a large development.
Maybe, I thought those rules were only for lane width. The number of lanes would be for public safety, anyway; if anything they'd decrease safety slightly by increasing the speed and for pedestrians definitely less safe.

Quote:
DH used to go to Vancouver frequently on business (happily, they just closed the Vancouver office) and he was not impressed. Just sayin'.
Either way, its transit ridership is high. It seemed like a nice city from what I saw, though I don't have strong opinions on it. Different people have different tastes, but I don't know what his criticisms were.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:50 AM
 
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The point about different ridership levels for different directions is a good one; I go through downtown Minneapolis on my way to work. The commuter buses arrive in the morning filled with people (who would otherwise be arriving via car), but on their way back out there appear to be hardly any riders. Would it be better to just not run those buses? I doubt it -- at least not if one is at all concerned about congestion.

Around here there has been some movement towards development clustered around suburban transit centers; perhaps if this picks up steam it will make it easier for people doing reverse commutes to take the bus, which could potentially build up the ridership going towards the 'burbs. Right now, here in the Twin Cities, anyway, it's just not practical to commute from city to most suburban workplaces via bus, because even if you could hop on a direct reverse commute commuter bus making its way back to the park-and-ride, how are you going to get to your office once you arrive? Some of this is changing with a new light rail line in development and some new bus options, and it will be interesting to see if it makes any difference long-term in ridership and commuting patterns.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:53 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Either way, its transit ridership is high. It seemed like a nice city from what I saw, though I don't have strong opinions on it. Different people have different tastes, but I don't know what his criticisms were.
I just asked him, he said "overcrowded and too expensive".
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It could affect the number of lanes for a road servicing a large development.

DH used to go to Vancouver frequently on business (happily, they just closed the Vancouver office) and he was not impressed. Just sayin'.
Funny. Everyone I've met who visits Vancouver comes home raving about it and saying they want to live there! I think it is, as nei put it, different people, different tastes.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^There's a difference between visiting as on vacation, and having to be there to conduct business, too.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:57 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I just asked him, he said "overcrowded and too expensive".
We probably have different ideas of what overcrowded is, I didn't get that at all. I thought it's level was normal-ish for a city and livelier by the number of people in the city center compared to Portland and Seattle. The newer architecture of Vancouver felt a bit sterile IMO but the beautiful setting almost makes up for it. I've heard it's expensive, not really sure.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^There's a difference between visiting as on vacation, and having to be there to conduct business, too.
True. But neither is the same as living. Hard to gauge living expenses for either. As for whether it's "crowded", I don't think it would make a difference.
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Old 02-09-2013, 09:59 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
The point about different ridership levels for different directions is a good one; I go through downtown Minneapolis on my way to work. The commuter buses arrive in the morning filled with people (who would otherwise be arriving via car), but on their way back out there appear to be hardly any riders. Would it be better to just not run those buses? I doubt it -- at least not if one is at all concerned about congestion.
No, but the buses are probably not saving much fuel over driving. Though, commute hour buses might have enough ridership.
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Old 02-09-2013, 11:39 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I just asked him, he said "overcrowded and too expensive".
I didn't find it very crowded. It was a little pricey.

It's quite different than a lot of other North American cities, which I found interesting. I didn't love it, but I found a lot about it I liked. I like that you don't have to go very far to get to stuff that looks like this:

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Old 02-09-2013, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^There's a difference between visiting as on vacation, and having to be there to conduct business, too.
The people I know who've visited Vancouver have been there for both work and for pleasure. I don't know anyone who has lived there, though. Just being there for a visit obviously isn't the same thing as living there permanently, but the overall comments I hear tend to be along the "what an amazing city! How do I get visa?!" variety. I don't know if they were evaluating costs -- but there are plenty of people out there who are willing to pay the premium to live in the right city.

To get back at least a little on topic, I think the ease of public transportation was part of the appeal. I can imagine that perhaps to someone who doesn't like cities they wouldn't understand the appeal. (no idea if your husband likes cities or not, but I'm assuming he's not a big urban fan if he doesn't like crowds)
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Old 02-09-2013, 01:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^DH grew up in a city. He likes walking, things like that. He does prefer a less dense environment than say, NYC, although we did live in "the city" in Denver.

There was a big conflict between the people in the Vancouver office and the people in Westminster, CO too, which may have contributed to his dislike of the place.

@Hands: Nice pic, but I don't think that's center city Vancouver. That's more to DH's liking for sure.
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