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Old 02-12-2013, 10:19 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Say what??? I live on the east coast and I've never heard that term. Perhaps only the town you live in uses that term.

Anyway, most developments around here (suburban Philadelphia) are built on farm fields. Ain't no forests left; ain't no trees to save. The wooded areas that are left are by and large protected land.
I'm curious what my parent's neighborhood was built on, but I think it was forest. Most New England developments are built on forest.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm curious what my parent's neighborhood was built on, but I think it was forest.
Forest when the house was built, or forest hundreds of years ago and farmed in the interim?

My mom's house was built on a swamp, that, eons ago, had been under Lake Erie. This time of year, you lose your shoes if you walk through the backyards. I keep telling her she should plant willows along the back property line, but she says they're too "messy". Like she does any yard work anyway ...
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:38 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Forest when the house was built, or forest hundreds of years ago and farmed in the interim?
The former, though farmed and then second growth forest by the time the house was built was also possible.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm curious what my parent's neighborhood was built on, but I think it was forest. Most New England developments are built on forest.
New England's farmland (outside of the Connecticut River) was basically abandoned en-masse for the Midwest in the 19th century. Massachusetts went from 2% forested in 1800 to 80% forested today.
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Old 02-12-2013, 10:50 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
New England's farmland (outside of the Connecticut River) was basically abandoned en-masse for the Midwest in the 19th century. Massachusetts went from 2% forested in 1800 to 80% forested today.
Massachusetts never went as low as 2%, maybe 37%.

http://www.nnfp.org/CCFE/Docs/PDF/Ma...ooperative.pdf

see 2nd page.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Massachusetts never went as low as 2%, maybe 37%.

http://www.nnfp.org/CCFE/Docs/PDF/Ma...ooperative.pdf

see 2nd page.
I stand corrected. One of my professors back in college must have been full of ****.
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Old 02-12-2013, 11:55 AM
 
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I think tee are often like toher landscaping consideratio and often a matter of afforablity. mnay neighborhhods ahve trees but they are often not keepup with or in right areas.No different than landscaping as far as frinage considerations.Where I lvie one does not want a tree too near the house or not trimmed regularly.ven the type are a consideatio on normal lots. I think people never consider that in past trees where picked for reason of shade and planted at least in my area.nice land scpae including drainage and tree types is not cheap.
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Old 02-12-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: OCNJ and or lower Florida keys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I don't know what "tree save" means, but when you're building on a cornfield, there are no trees to save.
Does this mean in Ohio they have "corn saves" and make them save a part of the development to grow corn?
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Old 02-13-2013, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdallas View Post
should they require? Yes, they should.
And for the most part "they" do. Here is a map of the parks and open space in my suburban city. Would it be that some of the requirements for parks and open space had been around when some of these eastern cities were being built.

http://www.louisvilleco.gov/Portals/...n/trailmap.pdf
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Old 02-13-2013, 10:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Massachusetts never went as low as 2%, maybe 37%.

http://www.nnfp.org/CCFE/Docs/PDF/Ma...ooperative.pdf

see 2nd page.
Yes, much of central and western MA are pretty heavily-forested, as well as points north of Boston ( which aren't developed)...

To answer the OP's question, I would vote "Yes", in favor of tree/grass planting. It does wonders for a community to improve its aesthestics.But it certainly can take time, unless you plant bushes and "import" grass plots..
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