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Old 02-28-2013, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
550 posts, read 1,091,034 times
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You pay a lot for housing or you pay a lot for transportation. Either way, you have to pay. People who have low housing costs tend to have high transportation costs and vice versa.
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Old 02-28-2013, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVAunit1981 View Post
You pay a lot for housing or you pay a lot for transportation. Either way, you have to pay. People who have low housing costs tend to have high transportation costs and vice versa.
That's true enough.
But the rental payments and/or mortgage payments will mostly stay in the country, and can recirculate within the community. While money paid offshore for oil imports, tends to build up in the hands of foreigners and can threaten the US dollar
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Old 03-01-2013, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
550 posts, read 1,091,034 times
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The biggest threat to the US dollar is US monetary policy - specifically the Fed and fiat money.

Besides, lots of foreign automakers have factories in the US. So automobiles help lots of people involved in that industry.

But back to the point: every place in the US is walkable. People use cars because cars are more convenient. If you want to walk somewhere then start walking. I don't see the problem here.
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Old 03-02-2013, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 872,207 times
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NEW TREND : A Big Change in Transport habits may be underway...
And younger people are leading it.

After living so many years overseas, I am ready to- at least- try living in the US again. This has been my plan for some years.

My hope was that the US would begin to transition towards a less car-dependent living arrangement, as oil prices rose. And I see some evidence that this change is occurring*; though you may not know it from most threads you may find on C-D.

Here, Chris Leinberger makes the case for "Walkable Urban" living in just two minutes:
VIDEO:

Chris Leinberger of Locus & Brookings Institute at the ULI Sustainability Summit - YouTube

(He refers to developments in Atlanta. But the same would apply to any city.)

A good mass transport system can drive future property investment, while providing a nice "insurance policy" against rising oil prices. I have watched how transport development in cities like London and Hong Kong has benefitted property investors in those two cities. After the property bust of the last few years, many US cities are now ready for this type of pro-growth development strategy IMHO.
=== ===

*Another sign of change: Young people are driving less, and fewer are even getting driver licenses:

“For the first time in two generations, there has been a significant shift in how many miles Americans are driving each year,” said Phineas Baxandall, Senior Transportation Analyst for U.S.PIRG Education Fund and a co-author of the report. “America needs to understand these trends when deciding how to focus our future transportation investments, especially when transportation dollars are so scarce.”

Transportation and the New Generation reveals that for the first time since World War II, Americans are driving less. The report shows that by 2011, the average American was driving 6 percent fewer miles per year than in 2004.

This trend away from driving is even more pronounced among young people. The average young person (age 16-34) drove 23 percent fewer miles in 2009 than the average young person in 2001. The report also notes that a growing number of young Americans do not have driver’s licenses; from 2000 to 2010, the share of 14 to 34-year-olds without a license increased from 21 percent to 26 percent.

===
/link: New Report: Long-Term Drop in How Much People Drive, Youth Desire More Transportation Options | U.S. PIRG

This represents a real sea-change. And as usual, the young are leading it.
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