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Old 02-20-2013, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 873,136 times
Reputation: 217

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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Yes, very true. My theory is that the more they build effective LR in Denver, the less need for adding lanes to freeways.
Eventually, they may even "put roads on a diet", and important new trend we are seeing in Town planning
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Old 02-21-2013, 02:03 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
Reputation: 3117
Light rail can be an answer to a problem. But sometimes, a municipality will identify the answer before the problem.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:25 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geologic View Post
Eventually, they may even "put roads on a diet", and important new trend we are seeing in Town planning
Been hearing this stuff for the entirety of my adulthood, 40 years now.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,113,739 times
Reputation: 3982
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Been hearing this stuff for the entirety of my adulthood, 40 years now.
It may be old news to you but really only recently as it been happening here in LA. And yes it is actually happening, not just lip service.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:18 PM
 
104 posts, read 137,106 times
Reputation: 192
The bus ride in of itself is very rarely the problem. The problem is waiting for the darn bus in the cold/rain/heat/snow and they're not on time. Or running after the bus but the driver drives off. Or a car passes by you, and splashes you with rain or snow.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,735 posts, read 9,848,997 times
Reputation: 9853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
The difficulty with light rail is that a fixed route of tracks is being overlain onto an existing fragmented metropolitan area. Heavy rail, including light rail, works not only when there's the population density to support it but if it's constructed so that it can move high volumes of people from point A to point B (usually home to the office and vice versa). But with work places scattered across the region instead of in a handful of concentrated employment centers and people living just about anywhere they can, light rail isn't as useful as buses can be. Other countries do have smaller cities with successful light rail systems but they also have much more powerful planning and zoning regulations that channel workplaces into concentrated employment districts, which makes it easier to have a light rail serving as many people as possible.
[snipped..]
To top it the light rail isn't necessarily quicker. It's quicker to drive from the furthermost stop on the Baltimore light rail route to downtown than it is to take the light rail, even in rush hour.
Automobiles will be more convenient, no argument there. But their costs are starting to become unbearable.
Barring a technological breakthrough, the future of land transport is electric rail.
Yes - Rail based transportation needs optimized urban planning.
For higher average speeds, distances between stops must be greater.
But that is inconvenient for all riders.

One solution, currently used by some elevators, is for the prospective passenger to select his destination beforehand. The car dispatcher can thus selectively pick which cars pick up the passengers. Thus "express" trains can be formed to better serve their passengers' needs.

Another idea is for rebates or refunds when a car reaches near maximum capacity. Thus the passengers share in the benefit from the reduction in cost per passenger - and offset some of the discomfort. That allows a rail company to charge a nominal high fare, that can better reflect costs, yet still attract more riders. On lines and times where ridership is high, the passengers enjoy a substantial discount for their patronage, at minimal cost to the operator. It also allows for any group to get "charter rates" by selecting off-peak use.

Finally, a complex of slow "local" train routes and a network of "express" routes can come close to the convenience of the automobile, providing that new construction adjusts accordingly.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,068 posts, read 16,085,690 times
Reputation: 12641
So you're going to encourage people to ride at peak times by charging less prices when the trains are full past the breaking point and you're employing "pushers" to shove the cattle in? Seems... silly. Charge more at peak times, not less. It's not like you save any money by shifting an elective trip at a non-peak time to a peak time. The non-peak train is still running, whether it has 7 people on it or 8. Actually, the opposite, you lose even more money since the peak-fare is lower than the off-peak.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14805
Obviously bad idea, but intercity bus companies usually charge a lower rate for routes that they know they can nearly fill up a bus compared to ones where they can't (for example, my town to NYC is cheaper than my town to Albany even though the distance is longer). Boston to NYC is cheaper still. The cost of running one bus is the same regardless of how much it fills up, so the companies can charge less while running a competitive business.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,735 posts, read 9,848,997 times
Reputation: 9853
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
So you're going to encourage people to ride at peak times by charging less prices when the trains are full past the breaking point and you're employing "pushers" to shove the cattle in? Seems... silly. Charge more at peak times, not less. It's not like you save any money by shifting an elective trip at a non-peak time to a peak time. The non-peak train is still running, whether it has 7 people on it or 8. Actually, the opposite, you lose even more money since the peak-fare is lower than the off-peak.
Silly?
The whole point is to increase ridership by giving an incentive to prospective riders.

"What if"
Nominal Fare = cost / ten riders (0.1 x cost)
Discount Fare = cost / forty riders (0.025 x cost)
Super Discount Fare = cost / eighty riders (0.0125 x cost)

The operator doesn't "lose money" - just doesn't get as much profit.
But he's not stuck with subsidizing marginal routes at a loss.
And he doesn't have to waste resources on luring more riders - the fare structure does that for him.
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Old 02-22-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,752,019 times
Reputation: 10164
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I see white people on that bus. Actually nothing but white people.
People on buses should wear helmets.
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