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Old 03-12-2013, 07:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Urban schools take field trips to rural areas.

Rural schools take field trips to the City.

Suburban schools take field trips to both the city and rural areas.

But do any schools take field trips to suburbia?
When my kids were in the younger grades, they took many field trips to the local grocery store, the fire station, the post office, etc. When they were studying Louisville/Colorado history, they took local trips to historical sites, including the site of an old coal mine that has coal burning underground.

*****

Regarding this issue that somehow my kids must be exceptions b/c "all" suburban kids do drugs and end up in jail or living boring lives and mine aren't doing that, I say "bull puckey". Not just my kids, but their friends, and my friends' kids are all doing different things. Some of the older ones HAVE married and had kids (not always in that order). Some have bought houses. Most of them over 25 are working. Is this bad? It may just be possible that some of you believe in stereotypes that just aren't true.

BTW, I would really, really like for someone to tell me what specific opportunities are available to city kids that aren't available to suburban kids. I'm especially interested in what kind of job opportunities anyone thinks city kids have that suburban kids don't.

One of the funniest posts I read on CD was by a teenager living in LA. S/he said "There's just nothing to do here in LA". Seriously. Teens like to whine, and that's one of their favorite whines. Most parents say, "If you can't find anything to do, I'll find something for you to do" and put the kids to work washing floors, doing laundry, dishes, etc.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 03-12-2013 at 07:31 PM..
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:00 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
Reputation: 3117
We took a field trip to Pizza Hut once!
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
We took a field trip to Pizza Hut once!
what grade was that?


Das Racist - Combination Pizza Hut And Taco Bell - YouTube

by city kids referencing city location
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:08 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
what grade was that?


Das Racist - Combination Pizza Hut And Taco Bell - YouTube

by city kids referencing city location
Hahaha. "Jamaica Avenue!"

Nope, just remembered it was a Cub Scout trip.
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:10 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
And for a contrary view:

Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
From what I've seen, few people who grow up within city limits and came from a somewhat wealthy background have suburban aspirations. But plenty of black kids do (particularly the ones who grow up in the worst neighborhoods), as do the kids who grow up in the remaining working-class white enclaves within major cities. They might not actually ever get the means to be in the suburbs, but that's still what they want.
Dated, I'm guessing the neighborhood was below average even for the tim, and maybe a bit NYC specific but still an interesting read.

The pope of Kingsbridge | Capital New York

Note the author didn't end up moving to the suburbs — he moved to a state built neighborhood full of apartment complexes
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:34 PM
 
Location: West Cedar Park, Philadelphia
1,225 posts, read 2,225,055 times
Reputation: 686
It's a novelty thing really.

I grew up in the sticks and hated it. Love living in the city now. People from the city who grew up here seem to hate it and want to move to the sticks. We all want what we don't have and we don't appreciate what we already have.

"Walking to work and the grocery store? Museums? Who cares!" they say, "I want land! I don't want to see my neighbors!" and that was exactly what I wanted to get away from.
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:39 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 24,493,926 times
Reputation: 7302
I don't think it really matters if there are other children around. I grew up in an urban aprtment area and wasn't around other kids until school age.

So I didn't know how to play games like tag, hide-n-seek, take turns, win or not win. children need to play with other children. I remember the first birthday party I went to, I was about five or six. I didn't know that the birthday child was the only one that got presents. I went home crying because I didn't get anything.

It took a long time until I figured out how to act around others.
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:09 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
To say that the environment doesn't matter is a bit misguided. The environment does matter especially, imo, they get into their teen years. Depression for middle class teens is on the rise and has been. Along with that, teens who live out in subdivisions find themselves dabbling in drugs, vandalizing property, trespassing, and just getting into trouble in general because they have nothing better to do when all you have are houses, a strip mall, and a McDonalds up the road. I'm strictly talking about middle class teens, not poor inner city youth who are definitely victims of their environment.

The environment definitely plays a role in the type of experiences a parent can offer their child and what the the child discovers for themselves.
Stats, or it's BS.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:25 PM
 
1,211 posts, read 885,394 times
Reputation: 1107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marius Pontmercy View Post
It's a novelty thing really.

People from the city who grew up here seem to hate it and want to move to the sticks.
I find the opposite - people who grew up in desirable cities never want to leave and are very loyal to the city.
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:56 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,635,588 times
Reputation: 1035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
When my kids were in the younger grades, they took many field trips to the local grocery store, the fire station, the post office, etc. When they were studying Louisville/Colorado history, they took local trips to historical sites, including the site of an old coal mine that has coal burning underground.

*****

Regarding this issue that somehow my kids must be exceptions b/c "all" suburban kids do drugs and end up in jail or living boring lives and mine aren't doing that, I say "bull puckey". Not just my kids, but their friends, and my friends' kids are all doing different things. Some of the older ones HAVE married and had kids (not always in that order). Some have bought houses. Most of them over 25 are working. Is this bad? It may just be possible that some of you believe in stereotypes that just aren't true.

BTW, I would really, really like for someone to tell me what specific opportunities are available to city kids that aren't available to suburban kids. I'm especially interested in what kind of job opportunities anyone thinks city kids have that suburban kids don't.

One of the funniest posts I read on CD was by a teenager living in LA. S/he said "There's just nothing to do here in LA". Seriously. Teens like to whine, and that's one of their favorite whines. Most parents say, "If you can't find anything to do, I'll find something for you to do" and put the kids to work washing floors, doing laundry, dishes, etc.

I'm not going to say that I don't believe you, but I don't think you nor any of your parent friends know what your they got up to when you guys weren't around and didn't tell you about.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Stats, or it's BS.
Quote:
Middle-class children living in suburbs and rural areas are bigger binge-drinkers and drug-takers than peers in the inner-cities, a survey said yesterday.
Eleven per cent of children across the country - some as young as 10 - admitted levels of alcohol and drug abuse considered worrying by the Government.
But in many affluent areas where youngsters tend to have greater spending power, the figure is considerably higher.

Middle-class bingers: Young teenagers in affluent areas 'are more likely to abuse drink and drugs' | Mail Online


That's just one of many that deal with the topic of teens and delinquent behavior based on research. I was inspired to make that previous post when I went to visit a friend who lives in the burbs. I was there for a couple days and when him and his friends got bored(which happened a lot) they would engage in activities or talks of activities that would land someone a citation. I'm in my early 20s and so is he. Some of his friends are as well, but some of them are still in the teens years. Admittedly I was pretty bored since you have to drive somewhere to do anything fun, but I also live in a city where I have plenty to do and not once since I've lived here have me and my group of friends decided to engage in any delinquent behavior.
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