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Old 03-15-2013, 08:30 PM
 
195 posts, read 235,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

I think the stress study is biased. They compared apples (suburban teens) to oranges (inner-city teens).
Not only that, they compare upper middle class suburban teens to low income urban teens. So whats the main factor? That they are richer, or that they live in a suburb?
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Old 03-16-2013, 05:49 AM
 
2,774 posts, read 3,588,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Surprise! That's what most tweens and teens want to do! The environment doesn't matter. Surely you remember this from being a kid yourself.

I think the stress study is biased. They compared apples (suburban teens) to oranges (inner-city teens).
I wouldn't say the environment doesn't matter - I think an environment that supports giving kids their freedom in a safe way is the most ideal in the tween/teen years. I'm particularly concerned about cars, because as a kid/tween had some terrible experiences. My neighbor was run over by a bus (I witnessed that) and I came very close to being hit by a car. This was in the suburbs so not where I'd really think traffic would be a big concern, but the streets were quite busy and without stop lights.

For teens, I'd be worried about driving, and am happy that in the city they'll have the opportunity to get out of the neighborhood without a car (sadly I also had peers in terrible automobile accidents as teens).

I think wherever you are, it's scary to be a parent in the tween/teen years. You need to let out the leash, but it's stressful.

Last edited by yodel; 03-16-2013 at 06:10 AM..
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Old 03-16-2013, 07:13 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by yodel View Post
I wouldn't say the environment doesn't matter - I think an environment that supports giving kids their freedom in a safe way is the most ideal in the tween/teen years. I'm particularly concerned about cars, because as a kid/tween had some terrible experiences. My neighbor was run over by a bus (I witnessed that) and I came very close to being hit by a car. This was in the suburbs so not where I'd really think traffic would be a big concern, but the streets were quite busy and without stop lights.

For teens, I'd be worried about driving, and am happy that in the city they'll have the opportunity to get out of the neighborhood without a car (sadly I also had peers in terrible automobile accidents as teens).

I think wherever you are, it's scary to be a parent in the tween/teen years. You need to let out the leash, but it's stressful.
As far as teens wanting to hang out with their friends, and not take in cultural events, etc, the environment doesn't matter one whit. That's what teens want to do. It's funny b/c that's the age where the museums, etc begin to have some meaning other than an outing.

As far as parenting teens, it's not for sissies!
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:56 AM
 
1,211 posts, read 887,150 times
Reputation: 1107
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEETC View Post
Semi-urban?

That's new.

[amused]
semiURBAN
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,767,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
While I'm as much an urban booster as anyone else, I'm guessing most (if not all) of the people you knew who grew up in the city are middle/upper middle class and white.

From what I've seen, few people who grow up within city limits and came from a somewhat wealthy background have suburban aspirations. But plenty of black kids do (particularly the ones who grow up in the worst neighborhoods), as do the kids who grow up in the remaining working-class white enclaves within major cities. They might not actually ever get the means to be in the suburbs, but that's still what they want.
Not in the least bit. All of them were middle class and of mixed races. Asian, black, white, and even blue. I don't know of any city kids who want to live in the suburbs, none.
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,883,454 times
Reputation: 4691
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Not in the least bit. All of them were middle class and of mixed races. Asian, black, white, and even blue. I don't know of any city kids who want to live in the suburbs, none.
You both are also from two very different cities, so that could have something to do with your differing experiences.
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:43 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 1,636,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
In re: depression-I think the suburban kids' parents can more afford the treatment. Doesn't mean their rate is higher.

Take a look at these high school graduation rates. Now I know that doesn't mean anything to any one student, but as a group, the suburban kids are doing far better.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/22/ed...pout.html?_r=0
** In Cleveland, for instance, where the gap was largest, only 38 percent of high school freshmen graduated within four years, compared with 80 percent in the Cleveland suburbs, the report said. In Baltimore, which has the nationís second-largest gap, 41 percent of students graduate from city schools, compared with 81 percent in the suburbs.

New York also had a large gap, with 54 percent of freshmen graduating within four years from schools in the city, compared with 83 percent from suburban high schools.


http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/..._rates_in.html
**Seventeen of the nation's 50 largest cities had high school graduation rates lower than 50 percent, with the lowest graduation rates reported in Detroit, Indianapolis and Cleveland, according to a report released Tuesday.
I haven't been on here in a while. Been busy.

It shouldn't be surprising to anyone that kids in the suburbs graduate at far higher rates than kids in inner cities or rural communities with similar conditions. That comes down to socioeconomics. The largest factor is most always going to be how much the parents make and how educated they are whether it's rural, suburbs, or city.

The more affluent someone is, the higher their chances of their kid becoming depressed. Your statement about affording depression treatment and curing it illustrates why depression is much more higher in developed countries overall compared to developing ones: an obsession with what money can buy. When one's physical needs can be easily met, all they have left to do is be bombarded by commercial images and compare themselves to people who have more. That higher rate of depression is what leads to higher rates of substance abuse.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Surprise! That's what most tweens and teens want to do! The environment doesn't matter. Surely you remember this from being a kid yourself.

I think the stress study is biased. They compared apples (suburban teens) to oranges (inner-city teens).
I think you have a little confirmation bias going on. Of course you don't think so. It contradicts what you believe. And to address your statement: no it's not apples to oranges. These studies focus on the suburbs because that's where these problems tends to be the highest and they compare to inner city kids because you would think with the problem would be just as bad considering the environment. It's hauntingly similar to third world vs first world countries
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:02 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
Reputation: 18050
Overall not that I can see with problems i city even effecting adults in mnay areas. I mean in mnay cities we see what security thr rich are willig to pay for as they see it as needed.
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,883,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post
I think you have a little confirmation bias going on. Of course you don't think so. It contradicts what you believe. And to address your statement: no it's not apples to oranges. These studies focus on the suburbs because that's where these problems tends to be the highest and they compare to inner city kids because you would think with the problem would be just as bad considering the environment. It's hauntingly similar to third world vs first world countries
But that doesn't sound like an urban/suburban divide so much as a class issue. You yourself said that "The more affluent someone is, the higher their chances of their kid becoming depressed."
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:21 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octa View Post

I think you have a little confirmation bias going on. Of course you don't think so. It contradicts what you believe. And to address your statement: no it's not apples to oranges. These studies focus on the suburbs because that's where these problems tends to be the highest and they compare to inner city kids because you would think with the problem would be just as bad considering the environment. It's hauntingly similar to third world vs first world countries
Maybe you could provide some links.
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