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Old 02-20-2013, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,561,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
(this info was previously posted but got buried in another thread so I wanted to make a new thread specific to this subject)

We currently live in a semi-urban area on the fringe of Boston. We have two small children, and many of our friends have move to the suburbs in the last few years. We have stuck it out, and when we go visit our friends in the suburbs we always come back home, glad we live where we do, but also realizing its not for everyone. For so many, it seems to be a foregone conclusion that suburbia is best for kids, so here is a challenge to that:


1. Its quieter here. Sounds crazy, right? One catch - as long as you live on a side street. Almost everyone uses a quiet reel lawn mower and week-whacking ...

Semi-urban?

That's new.

[amused]
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I know the facts about accidents. I'm questioning if these kids who live in an "inner-ring suburb" like the OPs are "much less likely" to be driving at 17-18. Heck, I grew up in a "bus suburb" that was also very walkable, and most of us couldn't wait till we could drive.
Knowing the area the OP is referring, her inner-ring suburb is likely much more walkable, and car use lower in general with rather inconvenient parking. It's as dense and walkable as most of Boston.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:21 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,412,818 times
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I'll look up statistics later, but I thought the percentage of teenagers was dropping, and had already started to drop pre-recession. It would make sense that those teens living in areas that don't require a car to participate in social activities would be less likely to drive than those who live in more auto-dependent areas.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:21 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,714,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
@ Kohmet: Yeah, my kids both ended up living under a bridge, after they got out of jail! (Heavy sarcasm)
It's a numbers game. . .you were lucky. Others not so much.

Odds are much better for kids not growing up in auto-dependent suburbs.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,107,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
From many suburbs, you may not be able to walk to public transportation to the city. And either way, often much more cumbersome. That's certainly true of the outer suburbs of Boston, where few would be in walking distance from a train station. Ditto for me.

I think it was 14 for me when I was allowed into the city without an adult (though not by myself).
My wife lived in the epitome of a safe suburban city and BART'ed (and drove sometimes) into San Francisco and Oakland probably around her freshman or sophomore year of high school. I'm pretty sure either way they park and rode.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
My wife lived in the epitome of a safe suburban city and BART'ed (and drove sometimes) into San Francisco and Oakland probably around her freshman or sophomore year of high school. I'm pretty sure either way they park and rode.
I assume parents or older teenagers drove to park and ride? It was someone dropped us off at the LIRR for us, which functions as a lower frequency BART in some ways. I enjoyed navigating the NYC subway system at all ages.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:23 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
It's a numbers game. . .you were lucky. Others not so much.

Odds are much better for kids not growing up in auto-dependent suburbs.
Hmm, PLEASE PROVIDE A LINK AND NOT TO SOME DUMB BLOG!
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,107,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I'll look up statistics later, but I thought the percentage of teenagers was dropping, and had already started to drop pre-recession. It would make sense that those teens living in areas that don't require a car to participate in social activities would be less likely to drive than those who live in more auto-dependent areas.
I've seen a few articles that reference kids spending more money on things like their phones and "stuff" rather than cars and gas - I could never afford the gas prices of today!
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,107,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I assume parents or older teenagers drove? It was someone dropped us off at the LIRR for us, which functions as a lower frequency BART in some ways.
Yeah most likely. Probably older teenagers.

In reference to the OP I have no opinion. Either one seems like a viable choice and has their own sets of pros and cons.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Fewer Teens Getting Driver Licenses: Study | AutoGuide.com News

Nothing about place of residence.
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