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Old 03-22-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Monmouth County, NJ & Staten Island, NY
407 posts, read 407,708 times
Reputation: 661

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFcatgirl View Post
New York isn't really the average American city. It's kind of like Paris in the way that pretty much everyone lives in an apartment instead of a house or flat. It's the most densely populated city in the United States. I live in a city and have a roomy flat and a yard and we don't have big block apartments. Yet we still have everything a city has to offer.
While New York is definitely the most densely populated city in the US, and has a large percent of apartment renters versus homeowners, I definitely wouldn't compare it to Paris or say that "pretty much everyone" lives in an apartment. If you go further out from Manhattan, you'll find large swaths of land in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island that are comprised of single family homes. While not necessarily suburban in nature, it's definitely "small town"-ish stuff like this in Queens, or this in Brooklyn, this in the Bronx and then of course the newer, downright suburban neighborhoods like mine in Staten Island.

Realistically, it's probably more like half and half, according to this website.

New York having a population of 8,244,910 with 3,023,330 housing units, only 1,514,341 of them being apartments, leaving at about half, which is what I would have just assumed anyway having grown up here and been in pretty much every corner of the city.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:46 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
While New York is definitely the most densely populated city in the US, and has a large percent of apartment renters versus homeowners, I definitely wouldn't compare it to Paris or say that "pretty much everyone" lives in an apartment. If you go further out from Manhattan, you'll find large swaths of land in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island that are comprised of single family homes. While not necessarily suburban in nature, it's definitely "small town"-ish stuff like this in Queens, or this in Brooklyn, this in the Bronx and then of course the newer, downright suburban neighborhoods like mine in Staten Island.

Realistically, it's probably more like half and half, according to this website.

New York having a population of 8,244,910 with 3,023,330 housing units, only 1,514,341 of them being apartments, leaving at about half, which is what I would have just assumed anyway having grown up here and been in pretty much every corner of the city.
Your numbers disagree with the census, which says 83% of households are in multi-unit buildings (not the same as the percent of residents, as houses tend to have more people per household in them since they have more families with children).

New York (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

The difference might be that your link defines "apartment" more specific than the census link, which considers any dwelling where one unit is on top of another a multi-unit dwelling. From what I've seen, New York City is somewhat comparable to Paris, if you adjust for Paris' city limits. Paris is only 50 square miles, containing the densest part of its metro much smaller relative to the entire metro than NYC, there are houses outside the city limits.

From what I've seen, even the "non-suburban looking" blocks of the outer boroughs often contain backyards, for example many rowhouses.
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Old 03-22-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
119 posts, read 159,712 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
While New York is definitely the most densely populated city in the US, and has a large percent of apartment renters versus homeowners, I definitely wouldn't compare it to Paris or say that "pretty much everyone" lives in an apartment. If you go further out from Manhattan, you'll find large swaths of land in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island that are comprised of single family homes. While not necessarily suburban in nature, it's definitely "small town"-ish stuff like this in Queens, or this in Brooklyn, this in the Bronx and then of course the newer, downright suburban neighborhoods like mine in Staten Island.

Realistically, it's probably more like half and half, according to this website.

New York having a population of 8,244,910 with 3,023,330 housing units, only 1,514,341 of them being apartments, leaving at about half, which is what I would have just assumed anyway having grown up here and been in pretty much every corner of the city.
I'm not talking about staten island or surrounding suburbs. I'm talking about Manhattan. Everyone in Manhattan lives in an apartment unless they got a loft a long time ago or they have a lot of money. I know you can go outside to another borough and have space. Like I mentioned my mom's from there. She was born in Brooklyn grew up in queens and then moved to Manhattan when she was 18. All her relatives that remain there have really inexpensive rent controlled apartments that they've been living in for years.

Last edited by SFcatgirl; 03-22-2013 at 04:48 PM..
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Old 03-22-2013, 04:42 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
119 posts, read 159,712 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepRightPassLeft View Post
While New York is definitely the most densely populated city in the US, and has a large percent of apartment renters versus homeowners, I definitely wouldn't compare it to Paris or say that "pretty much everyone" lives in an apartment. If you go further out from Manhattan, you'll find large swaths of land in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island that are comprised of single family homes. While not necessarily suburban in nature, it's definitely "small town"-ish stuff like this in Queens, or this in Brooklyn, this in the Bronx and then of course the newer, downright suburban neighborhoods like mine in Staten Island.

Realistically, it's probably more like half and half, according to this website.

New York having a population of 8,244,910 with 3,023,330 housing units, only 1,514,341 of them being apartments, leaving at about half, which is what I would have just assumed anyway having grown up here and been in pretty much every corner of the city.
The difference between the more crowded areas of New york and the suburbs was already mentioned by someone here who lives on Staten Island. I'm too lazy to go back and see who it was. She said she loves to get home to her quiet home on Staten Island at the end of the day, or something along those lines.
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Old 03-22-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
119 posts, read 159,712 times
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By the way I thought this topic was about whether it's better to raise your kids in the city or not? Where is this going?
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33065
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFcatgirl View Post
By the way I thought this topic was about whether it's better to raise your kids in the city or not? Where is this going?
Thank you. Many threads on this forum get hijacked into discussions about New York, DC, and some California cities.
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Old 03-22-2013, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,633 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Thank you. Many threads on this forum get hijacked into discussions about New York, DC, and some California cities.
To be fair though the best cities are located on the coasts, with a few exceptions of course. All cities aren't created equal... raising a kid in NYC or San Francisco is different than raising them in completely incompetent cities. Assuming you aren't on welfare.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33065
Quote:
Originally Posted by weteath View Post
To be fair though the best cities are located on the coasts, with a few exceptions of course. All cities aren't created equal... raising a kid in NYC or San Francisco is different than raising them in completely incompetent cities. Assuming you aren't on welfare.
1. We haven't talked about kids at all since my last post about high school graduation rates (#197) which no one else seems to want to address..

2. Many of these discussions about NY, DC, et al belong on their city's forums, not on urban planning. The rest of us, well, speaking for myself anyway, get bored out of our skulls during these conversatons.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,633 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
1. We haven't talked about kids at all since my last post about high school graduation rates (#197) which no one else seems to want to address..

2. Many of these discussions about NY, DC, et al belong on their city's forums, not on urban planning. The rest of us, well, speaking for myself anyway, get bored out of our skulls during these conversatons.
They are brought up because they can be used as an example for other cities.
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Old 03-22-2013, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti
389 posts, read 400,633 times
Reputation: 199
Also when I was in lower manhattan, near everyday last week around 2pm it was as if kids came out of nowhere, I wasn't looking around for schools or anything%
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