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Old 02-23-2013, 11:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
So many mass shootings and school shootings in suburbs like Aurora Colorado, Littleton Colorado, Newton Connecticut.
Aurora, Colorado has more people than Newark, NJ and a greater population density than Oklahoma City (speaking of "explosive")
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Old 02-23-2013, 11:46 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Suburban areas can be seen as breeding grounds for the most extremely violent and sociopathic outbursts. That's not to say there isn't violence in urban environments, of course there is. But to think of the suburbs as being immune from this just defies all evidence to the contrary. The most explosive and dangerous criminal acts tend to occur in suburbs, not cities.
And I can also write old urban row house neighborhoods trigger violence. :roll eyes: Neither one can you show accurate cause and effect. Overall, the number of violent deaths from school shootings is lower than inner city shooting deaths in the worst neighborhoods probably by far.
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Old 02-23-2013, 11:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Aurora, Colorado has more people than Newark, NJ and a greater population density than Oklahoma City (speaking of "explosive")
OKC is extremely suburban in form and size has nothing to do with whether something is suburban or rural.

Are you trying to argue Aurora isn't a suburb? A bit bizarre.
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Old 02-23-2013, 11:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
And I can also write old urban row house neighborhoods trigger violence. :roll eyes: Neither one can you show accurate cause and effect. Overall, the number of violent deaths from school shootings is lower than inner city shooting deaths in the worst neighborhoods probably by far.
I am just stating some things that are true - though people characterize suburbs as safe and gun violence as urban - in fact the worst mass shootings and the most explosive violent events tend to be located in suburban communities.
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
I am just stating some things that are true - though people characterize suburbs as safe and gun violence as urban - in fact the worst mass shootings and the most explosive violent events tend to be located in suburban communities.
And yet, crime stats show that murder rates are higher in the inner city. Yes, crime rates are dropping everywhere, but based purely on the statistics you cannot state that murder rates are higher in the suburbs.
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Old 02-23-2013, 01:21 PM
 
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I would be far more worried about the risks of death by automobile than I would by death by shooting (although the high rates of gun violence in this country very much trouble me). I don't know about the current numbers, but there was that big study about ten years ago documenting that exurbia was the most dangerous part of a metro area, thanks to the increased odds of being seriously injured or killed in a car accident. (I believe it's not just the higher number of miles traveled via car, but also that the travel is more likely to take place at higher speeds)

As for suburban versus urban crime rates, these days that's another reason why it makes little sense to lump all suburbs together; serious crime has been falling in most cities, yet has been rapidly increasing in some suburbs. Certainly not all suburban neighborhoods are places where families with a choice would choose to raise a family. But assuming by "suburb" one is talking about generally low-crime middle to upper class suburbia, the bigger risk comes from the car, not from a crazy gun with a gun (although I'd like to do whatever necessary to reduce that gun risk, too!).
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Old 02-23-2013, 03:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by semiurbanite View Post
It would be self-centered only if we were living in the city for us, even though we thought the suburbs would be a better place for the kids. To live in the city because one wanted that as children is not self-centered. In a way, don't we all assume the best place for our kids is where we think we would be happy as kids?

Btw regarding the title of the thread - it is posed as a question, not an assumption.
To some degree but as the old saying goes "If mama isn't happy nobody is happy.". If you are a parent and you desire to live in the city then raise your kids there. They are adaptable and will probably grow up a lot better adjusted than if you are out in the boonies and disliking it. Both the burbs and the city have good and bad things to offer kids and to some degree you can make up for each's sort commings(i.e. live in a more dense burb/ put kids in private school..which will likely be cheaper than spending hundreds of thousands more for an house in a good school district).

Also even Chicago's public schools can manage to have some good ones esp. at the grade school level(it is truely the high schools that are a major problem.). And the magnet High School are also very good(They are just hard to get into esp. for a transplant).
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Old 02-23-2013, 03:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
I would be far more worried about the risks of death by automobile than I would by death by shooting (although the high rates of gun violence in this country very much trouble me). I don't know about the current numbers, but there was that big study about ten years ago documenting that exurbia was the most dangerous part of a metro area, thanks to the increased odds of being seriously injured or killed in a car accident. (I believe it's not just the higher number of miles traveled via car, but also that the travel is more likely to take place at higher speeds)
Actually it is worse in the exburs. The increased speeds at which cars travel mean accidents that result in more injury(i.e. Most street in Chicago do not have traffic going 40+ miles an hour.). The increased distance from hosipitals means more time to get to treatment after an acident(increasing odds of death.)

The odds of getting killed by car are greater than getting kill by gun violence. It is just that gun violence is more sensless imho.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:01 PM
 
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The high injury and fatality rate of cars (both for drivers/riders and pedestrians) is why I really like those "20 is plenty" campaigns that are slowly making their way to this country. Unfortunately convincing people of the value of lower speed limits is a tough sell, no matter how many benefits.
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:53 PM
 
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I just saw this thread on a side-bar. Just read the first few pages of posts, so I'm not sure if my post is relevant or not. But here's my point of view anyway!

For many years I have worked in destinations that get busloads of children on field trips for four months out of each year, and we work closely with these children.

We shudder at busses from schools from the city. (I should say that to us, city and suburb are synonymous. What's the difference?) As a general rule kids from these schools have shorter attention spans and are ruder than children from the same age group who are raised in the country.

We LOVE schools from the country. Children raised in small towns or rural areas act more maturely at younger ages, are better mannered, and have longer attention spans than their city peers.

Why is this the case? I think probably because many rural children are expected to work or otherwise contribute as part of their families' lives, and so mature at a younger age than children who are raised in a city who do not have responsibilities. Also, children raised in rural areas know most of their neighbors and so grow up treating people they meet politely. Children raised in urban areas in which they don't know the people they pass in the streets don't develop empathy.

So, given the above, it is NOT better to raise kids in a city.

Either way, field trips start in April - eeeeeeeek!
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